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Technical Paper

Space Life Support from the Cellular Perspective

2001-07-09
2001-01-2229
Determining the fundamental role of gravity in vital biological systems in space is one of six science and research areas that provides the philosophical underpinning for why NASA exists. The study of cells, tissues, and microorganisms in a spaceflight environment holds the promise of answering multiple intriguing questions about how gravity affects living systems. To enable these studies, specimens must be maintained in an environment similar to that used in a laboratory. Cell culture studies under normal laboratory conditions involve maintaining a highly specialized environment with the necessary temperature, humidity control, nutrient, and gas exchange conditions. These same cell life support conditions must be provided by the International Space Station (ISS) Cell Culture Unit (CCU) in the unique environment of space. The CCU is a perfusion-based system that must function in microgravity, at unit gravity (1g) on earth, and from 0.1g up to 2g aboard the ISS centrifuge rotor.
Technical Paper

Research Alliances, A Strategy for Progress

1995-09-01
952146
In today's business climate rapid access to, and implementation of, new technology is essential to enhance competitive advantage. In the past, universities have been used for research contracts, but to fully utilize the intellectual resources of education institutions, it is essential to approach these relationships from a new basis: alliance. Alliances permit both parties to become active participants and achieve mutually beneficial goals. This paper will examine the drivers and challenges for industrial -- university alliances from both the industrial and academic perspectives.
Technical Paper

Acid Rain Control: A Canadian Perspective

1987-05-01
871071
In Canada, the acid rain issue has taken on a prominent political dimension. Its successful resolution as a transboundary issue is viewed by many as a bell weather for Canada - U.S. relationships on other issues of mutual concern. This paper offers some perspective on why this is so and what Canadian expectations are for parallel U.S. regulatory control actions.
Technical Paper

A Freezing Fog/Drizzle Event during the FRAM-S Project

2011-06-13
2011-38-0028
The objective of this work is to better understand freezing fog/drizzle conditions using observations collected during the Fog Remote Sensing and Modeling project (FRAM-S) that took place at St. John's International Airport, St. John's, NL, Canada. This location was ~1 km away from the Atlantic Ocean coast. During the project, the following measurements at one minute resolution were collected: precipitation rate (PR) and amount, fog/drizzle microphysics, 3D wind speed (Uh) and turbulence (Uh'), visibility (Vis), IR and SW radiative fluxes, temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH), and aerosol observations. The reflectivity and microphysical parameters obtained from the Metek Inc. MRR (Microwave Rain Radar) were also used in the analysis. The measurements were then used to obtain freezing fog/drizzle microphysical characteristics and their relation to visibility.
Technical Paper

Freezing Fog and Drizzle Observations

2015-06-15
2015-01-2113
Fog and drizzle observations collected during the arctic weather and SAR (Search and Rescue) operations (SAAWSO) project at sub-freezing temperatures (T) are analyzed in this study to identify icing conditions, improve ground-based in-situ and remote sensing observations, and develop icing parameterizations for numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. The SAAWSO project took place during the 2012-2013 winter conditions that occurred over St. John's, NFL, Canada. Observations were obtained by a Droplet Measuring Technologies Fog Measuring Device (FMD), a ground cloud imaging probe (GCIP), a Radiometrics Profiling Microwave Radiometer (PMWR), a Rosemount icing detector, a laser disdrometer, and surface meteorological sensors. Precipitation, wind, and radiation data were also collected. Results suggest that observations obtained from integrated in-situ and remote sensors can be used to characterize icing conditions.
Technical Paper

Aircraft In Situ Validation of Hydrometeors and Icing Conditions Inferred by Ground-based NEXRAD Polarimetric Radar

2015-06-15
2015-01-2152
MIT Lincoln Laboratory is tasked by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to investigate the use of the NEXRAD polarimetric radars* for the remote sensing of icing conditions hazardous to aircraft. A critical aspect of the investigation concerns validation that has relied upon commercial airline icing pilot reports and a dedicated campaign of in situ flights in winter storms. During the month of February in 2012 and 2013, the Convair-580 aircraft operated by the National Research Council of Canada was used for in situ validation of snowstorm characteristics under simultaneous observation by NEXRAD radars in Cleveland, Ohio and Buffalo, New York. The most anisotropic and easily distinguished winter targets to dual pol radar are ice crystals.
Technical Paper

The Mars Gravity Biosatellite: Atmospheric Reconditioning Strategies for Extended-Duration Rodent Life Support

2007-07-09
2007-01-3224
We present results which verify the design parameters and suggest performance capabilities/limitations of the Mars Gravity Biosatellite's proposed atmospherics control subassembly. Using a combination of benchtop prototype testing and analytic techniques, we derive control requirements for ammonia. Further, we demonstrate the dehumidification performance of our proposed partial gravity condensing heat exchanger. Ammonia production is of particular concern in rodent habitats. The contaminant is released following chemical degradation of liquid waste products. The rate of production is linked to humidity levels and to the design of habitat modules in terms of bedding substrate, air flow rates, choice of structural materials, and other complex factors. Ammonia buildup can rapidly lead to rodent health concerns and can negatively impact scientific return.
Technical Paper

Implications of Contingency Planning Support for Weather and Icing Information

2003-06-16
2003-01-2089
A human-centered systems analysis was applied to the adverse aircraft weather encounter problem in order to identify desirable functions of weather and icing information. The importance of contingency planning was identified as emerging from a system safety design methodology as well as from results of other aviation decision-making studies. The relationship between contingency planning support and information on regions clear of adverse weather was investigated in a scenario-based analysis. A rapid prototype example of the key elements in the depiction of icing conditions was developed in a case study, and the implications for the components of the icing information system were articulated.
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