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Technical Paper

Certification Issues for a Tilt-Rotor Aircraft

1987-10-01
871852
Powered-lift aircraft, such as the V-22 tilt-rotor, are likely to spin-off a civil version. The present FAA airworthiness certification standards are not considered to be adequate for these unique aircraft. The FAA has drafted certification criteria and held a public conference to review the draft and identify significant technical certification issues that require further effort to establish correct standards for powered-lift aircraft. Some of those issues are discussed.
Technical Paper

Canard Certification Loads — A Review of FAA Concerns

1987-10-01
871847
Since the first airplane was certified in 1927, the standard configuration has been with the main lifting surface or surfaces forward of the stabilizing surface. Although some of the advantages of the canard configuration were recognized quite early - by the Wright Brothers, for example - canard surfaces have been used to date only as additional control surfaces on some military airplanes, and on some amateur built airplanes. As a result, the Airworthiness Regulations of Reference 1 address only tail aft configurations. When FAA was first approached regarding certification of a canard configured small airplane, an FAA/Industry Empennage Loads Working Group was formed to develop technical proposals for the necessary rule changes and policy. The concerns addressed by this working group are discussed in the following sections.
Technical Paper

Certification Issues Regarding Advanced Technology Control Systems in Civil Rotorcraft

1987-10-01
871850
Microprocessor technology is allowing functions in aircraft to be implemented to a greater degree by digital process control than by conventional mechanical or electromechanical means. A review of this technology indicates a need for updated certification criteria. A high level of commitment to the technology such as fly-by-wire is completely beyond the scope of existing certification criteria. This paper emphasizes the areas of software validation levels, increased concern with basic power system qualification, and increased environmental concerns for electromagnetic interference and lightning.
Technical Paper

Review of Engine Maintenance Concepts Applied to Wide Body Jets

1973-02-01
730375
In the early design stages of the advanced technology high-bypass-ratio engines, it became evident that maintainability considerations and more effective maintenance concepts would be necessary to achieve higher reliability and more economically successful powerplants. This paper reviews the major design considerations from a maintainability standpoint. It describes the concepts developed specifically to provide more effective maintenance for the wide-body jets. It discusses the effectiveness of these programs, and provides an insight into new philosophies and trends envisioned by the Federal Aviation Administration for future maintenance management programs.
Technical Paper

Simulation's Potential Role in Advanced Aircraft Certification

1976-02-01
760931
In view of the fact that future generations of derivative or new aircraft will be faced with problems of increasing operating efficiency, new and more advanced technology will have to be introduced. To this end, the Federal Aviation Administration has been examining the certification question and has concluded that simulation may be increasingly important in the future certification activities. Through a contract with Lockheed Aircraft Company, the FAA will be able to review past use of industrial simulation in connection with certification.
Technical Paper

The Aviation Safety Analysis System (ASAS): An Overview

1982-02-01
821448
The Federal Aviation Administration has placed increasing emphasis on modern information systems to achieve safety improvements. The ASAS (Aviation Safety Analysis System) is a comprehensive new system to upgrade significantly the agency's ability to collect process and disseminate safety-related information.
Technical Paper

Training Solutions from FAA Maintenance Human Factors Research & Development

2000-04-11
2000-01-2132
The FAA Office of Aviation Medicine has developed, delivered, and tested a variety of training systems over the past decade. The systems, their design, and guidance materials are directly transferable to the aviation industry at no cost. This paper describes the many training systems that are available.
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