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Technical Paper

Exhaust Manifold Radiated Noise Prediction Methodology

2001-04-30
2001-01-1433
The spark ignition engine is a prime source of vibration energy. NVH disturbances generated by the engine ultimately reach the customer in the form of objectionable noise or NVH. Exhaust Manifolds are one of the many sources of noise contributors among the engine components. Often, the exhaust manifold is identified as a source of objectionable NVH late in the design and development process. Due to the lack of an upfront NVH analysis tool, a new CAE NVH methodology for evaluating new exhaust manifold designs has been investigated and developed by the Ford Motor Company's V-Engine CAE and Exhaust Manifold Design Sections. This new CAE methodology has been developed to compare the NVH performance of current production exhaust manifolds to new design levels. Mechanical induced radiated shell noise is the predominate cause of objectionable NVH in exhaust manifolds.
Technical Paper

Experimental Study of Automotive Heat Shield Geometry with Natural Convection and Radiation Boundary Conditions

2001-05-14
2001-01-1746
Shielding a vehicle underbody is becoming a daunting task with increased exhaust temperatures due to emissions regulations and ever-increasing packaging constraints, which place components ever closer to exhaust systems. This experimental study was initiated to evaluate the two dimensional thermal effects of heat shield flange height and shield width in vehicle underbody idle conditions. The ultimate goal of this study is to develop a function to optimize the shape of heat shielding to achieve a specified floorpan temperature during vehicle idle conditions.
Technical Paper

Investigation of the Dilution Process for Measurement of Particulate Matter from Spark-Ignition Engines

1998-10-19
982601
Measurements of particulate matter (PM) from spark ignition (SI) engine exhaust using dilution tunnels will become more prevalent as emission standards are tightened. Hence, a study of the dilution process was undertaken in order to understand how various dilution related parameters affect the accuracy with which PM sizes and concentrations can be determined. A SI and a compression ignition (CI) engine were separately used to examine parameters of the dilution process; the present work discusses the results in the context of SI exhaust dilution. A Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) was used to measure the size distribution, number density, and volume fraction of PM. Temperature measurements in the exhaust pipe and dilution tunnel reveal the degree of mixing between exhaust and dilution air, the effect of flowrate on heat transfer from undiluted and diluted exhaust to the environment, and the minimum permissible dilution ratio for a maximum sample temperature of 52°C.
Technical Paper

Effect of Engine Operating Parameters on Hydrocarbon Oxidation in the Exhaust Port and Runner of a Spark-Ignited Engine

1995-02-01
950159
The effect of engine operating parameters (speed, spark timing, and fuel-air equivalence ratio [Φ]) on hydrocarbon (HC) oxidation within the cylinder and exhaust system is examined using propane or isooctane fuel. Quench gas (CO2) is introduced at two locations in the exhaust system (exhaust valve or port exit) to stop the oxidation process. Increasing the speed from 1500 to 2500 RPM at MBT spark timing decreases the total, cylinder-exit HC emissions by ∼50% while oxidation in the exhaust system remains at 40% for both fuels. For propane fuel at 1500 rpm, increasing Φ from 0.9 (fuel lean) to 1.1 (fuel rich) reduces oxidation in the exhaust system from 42% to 26%; at 2500 RPM, exhaust system oxidation decreases from 40% to approximately 0% for Φ = 0.9 and 1.1, respectively. Retarded spark increases oxidation in the cylinder and exhaust system for both fuels. Decreases in total HC emissions are accompanied by increased olefinic content and atmospheric reactivity.
Technical Paper

A Thermoviscoplastic FE Model for the Strain Prediction in High Temperature, Thermal Cycling Applications for Silicon Molybdenum Nodular Cast Iron

1998-02-23
980697
The design of components for high temperature, thermal cycling situations has traditionally been a challenging problem because the analysis must compensate for the non-linear behavior of the material. One example for automotive applications is the exhaust manifold, where temperatures may reach 900°C during thermal cycling. Fatigue failure and excessive deformation of these components must be analyzed with thermoviscoplastic models. A Finite Element (FE) model is developed to simulate the material behavior at high temperature, thermal cycling conditions. A specimen of Silicon Molybdenum Nodular Cast Iron (4% Si, 0.8% Mo) is cycled between maximum temperatures of 500°C and 960°C while the stress is measured with respect to time. The model predictions for stress are compared to the experimental results for two rates of thermal cycling. The analysis is conducted with and without creep effects to understand its contribution to the overall strain.
Technical Paper

Parametric Simulation of Significant Design and Operating Alternatives Affecting the Fuel Economy and Emissions of Spark-Ignited Engines

1978-02-01
780943
A fundamental thermodynamic model of the complete spark-ignited, homogeneous charge engine cycle has been used in several parametric analyses to predict the effects of engine design and operating alternatives on fuel consumption and emissions of NOx and unburned hydrocarbons (HC). The simulation includes sub-models for wall heat transfer, NOx and HC emissions, and the engine breathing processes. This work demonstrates the power and utility of a comprehensive engine simulation by presenting several independent parametric studies that were carried out in response to genuine engine design and/or operating strategy questions. Included in this compilation are the effects of cycle heat loss, exhaust port heat loss, combustion duration, and charge dilution (EGR and/or lean air-fuel ratio). In addition, the influence of the design variables associated with bore-stroke ratio, intake and exhaust valve lift, and cam timing are considered.
Technical Paper

Time Resolved Measurements of Exhaust Composition and Flow Rate in a Wankel Engine

1975-02-01
750024
Measurements were made of exhaust histories of the following species: unburned hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and nitric oxide (NO). The measurements show that the exhaust flow can be divided into two distinct phases: a leading gas low in HC and high in NO followed by a trailing gas high in HC and low in NO. Calculations of time resolved equivalence ratio throughout the exhaust process show no evidence of a stratified combustion. The exhaust mass flow rate is time resolved by forcing the flow to be locally quasi-steady at an orifice placed in the exhaust pipe. The results with the quasi-steady assumption are shown to be consistent with the measurements. Predictions are made of time resolved mass flow rate which compare favorably to the experimental data base. The composition and flow histories provide sufficient information to calculate the time resolved flow rates of the individual species measured.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Model Calculations and Experimental Measurements of the Bulk Cylinder Flow Processes in a Motored PROCO Engine

1979-02-01
790290
A PROCO Flow Simulation (PFSIM) model has been developed to calculate the angular velocity (swirl) and radial velocity (squish) as a function of crank angle for the four strokes of the motored engine cycle. In addition, the PFSIM model calculates the time dependent cylinder pressure, temperature and mass. The model accepts the following swirl-related parameters as input: dimensionless angular momentum and mass flow coefficients for a specific intake and exhaust system configuration. These parameters determine the intake-generated swirl which is computed from the angular momentum flux entering the cylinder during the induction process. An angular momentum flux swirl meter was used to obtain the required input data for three different intake port configurations, and calculations of the bulk cylinder flow were carried out with PFSIM for each intake port configuration.
Technical Paper

Three-Dimensional Simulations of Automotive Catalytic Converter Internal Flow

1991-02-01
910200
The three-dimensional non-reacting flow field inside a typical dual-monolith automotive catalytic converter was simulated using finite difference analysis. The monolithic brick resistance was formulated from the pressure gradient of fully developed laminar duct-flow and corrected for the entrance effect. This correlation was found to agree with experimental pressure drop data, and was introduced as an additional source term into the non-dimensional momentum governing equation within the brick. Flow distribution within the monolith was found to depend strongly on the diffuser performance, which is a complex function of flow Reynolds number, brick resistance, and inlet pipe length and bending angles. A distribution index was formulated to quantify the degree of non-uniformity at selected test cases covering ranges of flow conditions, brick types, and inlet conditions.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Spark Ignition Engine Warm-Up Process to Predict Component Temperatures and Hydrocarbon Emissions

1991-02-01
910302
In order to understand better the operation of spark-ignition engines during the warm-up period, a computer model had been developed which simulates the thermal processes of the engine. This model is based on lumped thermal capacitance methods for the major engine components, as well as the exhaust system. Coolant and oil flows, and their respective heat transfer rates are modeled, as well as friction heat generation relations. Piston-liner heat transfer is calculated based on a thermal resistance method, which includes the effects of piston and ring material and design, oil film thickness, and piston-liner crevice. Piston/liner crevice changes are calculated based on thermal expansion rates and are used in conjunction with a crevice-region unburned hydrocarbon model to predict the contribution to emissions from this source.
Technical Paper

Cylinder Head Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Risk Assessment under Customer Usage

2017-03-28
2017-01-1086
For aluminum automotive cylinder head designs, one of the concerning failure mechanisms is thermo-mechanical fatigue from changes in engine operating conditions. After an engine is assembled, it goes through many different operating conditions such as cold start, through warm up, peak power, and intermediate cycles. Strain alternation from the variation in engine operation conditions change may cause thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) failure in combustion chamber and exhaust port. Cylinder heads having an integrated exhaust manifold are especially exposed to this failure mode due to the length and complexity of the exhaust gas passage. First a thermo-mechanical fatigue model is developed to simulate a known dynamometer/bench thermal cycle and the corresponding thermo-mechanical fatigue damage is quantified. Additionally, strain state of the cylinder head and its relation to thermo-mechanical fatigue are discussed. The bench test was used to verify the TMF analysis approach.
Technical Paper

A Modeling Analysis of Fibrous Media for Gasoline Particulate Filters

2017-03-28
2017-01-0967
With an emerging need for gasoline particulate filters (GPFs) to lower particle emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines, studies are being conducted to optimize GPF designs in order to balance filtration efficiency, backpressure penalty, filter size, cost and other factors. Metal fiber filters could offer additional designs to the GPF portfolio, which is currently dominated by ceramic wall-flow filters. However, knowledge on their performance as GPFs is still limited. In this study, modeling on backpressure and filtration efficiency of fibrous media was carried out to determine the basic design criteria (filtration area, filter thickness and size) for different target efficiencies and backpressures at given gas flow conditions. Filter media with different fiber sizes (8 - 17 μm) and porosities (80% - 95%) were evaluated using modeling to determine the influence of fiber size and porosity.
Technical Paper

Three-Way Catalyst Diagnostics and Prognostics Based on Support Vector Machines

2017-03-28
2017-01-0975
A three-way catalytic converter (TWC) is an emissions control device, used to treat the exhaust gases in a gasoline engine. The conversion efficiency of the catalyst, however, drops with age or customer usage and needs to be monitored on-line to meet the on board diagnostics (OBD II) regulations. In this work, a non-intrusive catalyst monitor is developed to diagnose the track the remaining useful life of the catalyst based on measured in-vehicle signals. Using air mass and the air-fuel ratio (A/F) at the front (upstream) and rear (downstream) of the catalyst, the catalyst oxygen storage capacity is estimated. The catalyst capacity and operating exhaust temperature are used as an input features for developing a Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm based classifier to identify a threshold catalyst. In addition, the distance of the data points in hyperspace from the calibrated threshold plane is used to compute the remaining useful life left.
Technical Paper

Computational Aeroacoustics of Mufflers for Exhaust Air Rush Prediction and Experimental Validation

2017-03-28
2017-01-1311
Air rush noise is exhaust gas driven flow-induced noise in the frequency range of 500-6500 Hz. It is essential to understand the flow physics of exhaust gases within the mufflers in order to identify any counter measures that can attenuate this error state. This study is aimed at predicting the flow physics and air rush noise of exhaust mufflers in the aforementioned frequency range at a typical exhaust flow rate and temperature. The study is performed on two different muffler designs which show a significant air rush noise level difference when tested on the vehicle. The transient computational study was performed using DES with 2nd order spatial discretization and 2nd order implicit scheme for temporal discretization in StarCCM+. To compare with test data, a special flow test stand is designed so that all high and low frequency contents emanating from the engine are attenuated before the flow enters the test part.
Technical Paper

CFD Topology and Shape Optimization for Port Development of Integrated Exhaust Manifolds

2017-03-28
2017-01-1339
Modern cylinder-head designs for gasoline engines are guiding the exhaust gas to the turbocharger system via an integrated exhaust manifold (IEM) which has several advantages like weight and cost reduction. On the other hand, the exhaust ports are running through a package labyrinth and are heavily bent within smallest space. Increased pressure drop, reduced mass flow rate, and deteriorated port flow efficiency could be the consequences leading to higher emissions, increased fuel consumption, and higher knock sensitivity. The optimization of the individual ports by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a proper means to minimize or even delete these drawbacks. Meanwhile, there are several powerful optimization methods for three-dimensional flows on the market. In this paper, a combined optimization strategy using CFD topology optimization followed by a shape optimization is presented.
Technical Paper

Lab Study of Urea Deposit Formation and Chemical Transformation Process of Diesel Aftertreatment System

2017-03-28
2017-01-0915
Diesel exhaust fluid, DEF, (32.5 wt.% urea aqueous solution) is widely used as the NH3 source for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx in diesel aftertreatment systems. The transformation of sprayed liquid phase DEF droplets to gas phase NH3 is a complex physical and chemical process. Briefly, it experiences water vaporization, urea thermolysis/decomposition and hydrolysis. Depending on the DEF doser, decomposition reaction tube (DRT) design and operating conditions, incomplete decomposition of injected urea could lead to solid urea deposit formation in the diesel aftertreatment system. The formed deposits could lead to engine back pressure increase and DeNOx performance deterioration etc. The formed urea deposits could be further transformed to chemically more stable substances upon exposure to hot exhaust gas, therefore it is critical to understand this transformation process.
Technical Paper

LOOP SCAVENGING versus THROUGH SCAVENGING of TWO-STROKE ENGINES

1958-01-01
580044
THIS paper reports the latest investigation of the relative merits of loop scavenging versus through scavenging. The authors hope that the conditions of the work permitted an objective evaluation of the two types of engines. The results of the study may be summarized as follows: 1. With symmetrical timing, neither cylinder shows significant advantage in trapping efficiency. 2. With symmetrical timing, the best ratio of exhaust-port to inlet-port effective area seems to be about 0.6. 3. Unsymmetrical timing is an effective method of improving trapping efficiency. 4. The value of net indicated fuel economy shows no significant difference between the two cylinders. The authors point out that because the areas were equal it is unlikely that the optimum port design of each type was used in comparing the cylinders. If optimum porting had been used, the two types might have shown more difference.
Technical Paper

Time-Resolved Measurements of Hydrocarbon Mass Flowrate in the Exhaust of a Spark-Ignition Engine

1972-02-01
720112
Experimental measurements of the instantaneous exhaust gas temperature, mass flowrate, and hydrocarbon concentration have been made in the exhaust of a single cylinder research engine. The temperature measurements were accomplished using an infrared optical technique and observing the radiation of the exhaust gas at the 4.4 μm band of CO2. Instantaneous exhaust gas mass flowrates were monitored by placing a restriction in the exhaust manifold and measuring the instantaneous pressures across the restriction. Time-resolved hydrocarbon concentrations were measured using a fast-acting sampling valve with an open time of 2 ms. From these measurements, the hydrocarbon mass flowrate is calculated as a function of crank angle.
Technical Paper

Modeling Study of Metal Fiber Diesel Particulate Filter Performance

2015-04-14
2015-01-1047
Sintered metal fiber (SMF) diesel particulate filters (DPF) has more than one order of magnitude lower pressure drop compared to a granular or reaction-born DPF of the same (clean) filtration efficiency. To better understand the filtration process and optimize the filter performance, metal fiber filter models are developed in this study. The major previous theoretical models for clean fibrous filter are summarized and compared with experimental data. Furthermore, a metal fiber DPF soot loading model, using similar concept developed in high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter modeling, is built to simulate filter soot loading performance. Compared with experimental results, the soot loading model has relatively good predictions of filter pressure drop and filtration efficiency.
Technical Paper

Scavenging the 2-Stroke Engine

1954-01-01
540258
THE indicated output of a 2-stroke engine is primarily dependent upon the success with which the products of combustion are driven from the cylinder and are replaced by fresh air or mixture during the scavenging period. Such replacement must, of course, be accomplished with a minimum of blower power. This paper deals with various aspects of 2-stroke research conducted at M.I.T. during the past 10 years. Among the subjects discussed are the methods used in the prediction and measurement of scavenging efficiency, and the effect of engine design and operating variables on the scavenging blower requirements as reflected by the scavenging ratio.
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