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Technical Paper

Calculations of Wind Tunnel Circuit Losses and Speed with Acoustic Foams

2008-04-14
2008-01-1203
The GM Aerodynamics Laboratory (GMAL) was modified in 2001 to reduce the background noise level and provide a semi-anechoic test section for wind noise testing. The walls and ceiling of the test section were lined with acoustic foam and foam-filled turning vanes were installed in the corners. Portions of the wind tunnel circuit were also treated with fiberglass material covered by perforated sheet metal panels. High skin drag due to roughness of the foam surfaces, along with high blockage due to the large turning vanes, increased the wind tunnel circuit losses so that the maximum wind speed in the test section was reduced. The present study calculates the averaged total pressure losses at three locations to evaluate the reductions in skin drag and blockage from proposed modifications to the circuit, which were intended to increase the test section wind speed without compromising noise levels.
Technical Paper

Internal and Near-Nozzle Flow in a Multi-Hole Gasoline Injector Under Flashing and Non-Flashing Conditions

2015-04-14
2015-01-0944
A computational and experimental study was performed to characterize the flow within a gasoline injector and the ensuing sprays. The computations included the effects of turbulence, cavitation, flash-boiling, compressibility, and the presence of non-condensible gases. The flow domain corresponded to the Engine Combustion Network's Spray G, an eight-hole counterbore injector operating in a variety of conditions. First, a rate tube method was used to measure the rate of injection, which was then used to define inlet boundary conditions for simulation. Correspondingly, injection under submerged conditions was simulated for direct comparison with experimental measurements of discharge coefficient. Next, the internal flow and external spray into pressurized nitrogen were simulated under the base spray G conditions. Finally, injection under flashing conditions was simulated, where the ambient pressure was below the vapor pressure of the fuel.
Technical Paper

Effects of Altitude and Road Gradients in Boosted Hydraulic Brake Systems

2016-04-05
2016-01-0463
Brake systems are strongly related with safety of vehicles. Therefore a reliable design of the brake system is critical as vehicles operate in a wide range of environmental conditions, fulfilling different security requirements. Particularly, countries with mountainous geography expose vehicles to aggressive variations in altitude and road grade. These variations affect the performance of the brake system. In order to study how these changes affect the brake system, two approaches were considered. The first approach was centered on the development of an analytical model for the longitudinal dynamics of the vehicle during braking maneuvers. This model was developed at system-level, considering the whole vehicle. This allowed the understanding of the relation between the braking force and the altitude and road grade, for different fixed deceleration requirement scenarios. The second approach was focused on the characterization of the vacuum servo operation.
Technical Paper

Experimental Characterization of the Unsteady Flow Field behind Two outside Rear View Mirrors

2008-04-14
2008-01-0476
The unsteady flow fields behind two different automobile outside side rear view mirrors were examined experimentally in order to obtain a comprehensive data base for the validation of the ongoing computational investigation effort to predict the aero-acoustic noise due to the outside rear view mirrors. This study is part of a larger scheme to predict the aero-acoustic noise due to various external components in vehicles. To aid with the characterization of this complex flow field, mean and unsteady surface pressure measurements were undertaken in the wake of two mirror models. Velocity measurements with particle image velocimetry were also conducted to develop the mean velocity field of the wake. Two full-scale mirror models with distinctive geometrical features were investigated.
Technical Paper

A Study of Material Compatibility With Deionized Water

2003-03-03
2003-01-0804
Deionized (DI) water is being used for humidification and cooling on some fuel cell designs. This highly purified water is corrosive, yet the high purity is required to maintain the function and durability of the fuel cell. A study of the deionized water system was undertaken to determine the effect of various materials on water quality, and also to determine the effect of deionized water on each material. The test setup was designed to circulate fluid from a reservoir, similar to an actual application. The fluid temperature, pressure, and flow rate were controlled. The resistivity of the water was observed and recorded. Pre- and post-testing of the water and the materials was performed. The goal is to achieve system cleanliness and durability similar to a stainless steel system using lighter, less expensive materials. This paper describes the test setup, test procedures, and the overall results for the eight materials tested.
Technical Paper

The Development and Implementation of an Engine Off Natural Vacuum Test for Diagnosing Small Leaks in Evaporative Emissions Systems

2003-03-03
2003-01-0719
This paper discusses an approach to detecting small leaks in an automobile's evaporative emissions systems that is a technique based upon ideal gas laws. It does this by monitoring pressure in the system while the vehicle's engine is off. This low cost solution can be easily implemented on General Motors vehicles using existing components. The topics covered in this paper include details on the background of the problem and the technique, the underlying thermodynamics of the technique, a description of the algorithm, testing and data collection considerations.
Technical Paper

Impact of Ultra Thinwall Catalyst Substrates for TIER2 Emission Standards

2003-03-03
2003-01-0658
The impact of ultra thinwall catalysts on TIER2 emission performance, packaging and total system cost was evaluated. The primary focus was to compare ultra-thinwall and thinwall cell configurations (400/3, 400/4, 600/2, 600/3, 600/3 hex, 900/2, and 1200/2) with a baseline 600/4 at constant substrate volume, washcoat and PGM loading. Other areas investigated included the evaluation of decreasing catalyst volume while maintaining constant or increased mass transfer capabilities while holding washcoat and PGM loadings constant. The emissions impact of varying washcoat and PGM loading was measured on specific substrates, including a comparison of square to hex cell. Backpressure for each configuration was calculated with the Corning substrate pressure drop modeling tool. Converters were rapid aged on dynamometers reflecting approximately a 50,000 mile aged performance. Emission testing was completed using the FTP test cycle.
Journal Article

Functional Requirements to Exceed the 100 kW/l Milestone for High Power Density Automotive Diesel Engines

2017-09-04
2017-24-0072
The paper describes the challenges and results achieved in developing a new high-speed Diesel combustion system capable of exceeding the imaginative threshold of 100 kW/l. High-performance, state-of-art prototype components from automotive diesel technology were provided in order to set-up a single-cylinder research engine demonstrator. Key design parameters were identified in terms boost, engine speed, fuel injection pressure and injector nozzle flow rates. In this regard, an advanced piezo injection system capable of 3000 bar of maximum injection pressure was selected, coupled to a robust base engine featuring ω-shaped combustion bowl and low swirl intake ports. The matching among the above-described elements has been thoroughly examined and experimentally parameterized.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Racetrack / High Energy Driving on Brake Caliper Performance

2006-04-03
2006-01-0472
It is well understood that conditions encountered during racetrack driving are amongst the most severe to which vehicle braking systems can be subjected. High braking pressure is combined with enormous energy input and high temperatures for multiple braking events. Brake fade, degradation of brake pedal feel, and brake lining taper/overall wear are common results of racetrack usage. This paper focuses on how racetrack and high energy driving-type conditioning affects the performance of the brake caliper - in particular, its ability to maintain an even pressure distribution at all of its interfaces (pad to rotor, piston to pad backing plate, and housing to pad backing plate).
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