Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 9 of 9
Technical Paper

Determining Physical Properties for Rotating Components Using a Free-Free Torsional FRF Technique

2011-05-17
2011-01-1663
This paper presents a test methodology to determine the physical properties of stiffness and damping for powertrain rotating components using a free-free torsional frequency response measurement. The test methodology utilizes free-free boundary conditions and traditional modal test techniques applied to symmetric rotating components with substantially large bounding masses of known inertia. A modal test on the rotating component is executed by mounting accelerometers on opposing tangential bosses in the same direction on each of the inertial masses and impacting one of the bosses with a modal hammer to acquire frequency response functions (FRF's). Physical properties are then extracted from the FRF's using fundamental vibration relationships for an assumed two degree of freedom system. Stiffness and damping values for a variety of hollow tube carbon fiber drive shafts and a comparable steel-aluminum shaft are reported using the methodology presented.
Technical Paper

A Dual Clutch Torque Converter for Dual Input Shaft Transmissions

2013-04-08
2013-01-0232
This paper presents an alternative launch device for layshaft dual clutch transmissions (DCT's). The launch device incorporates a hydrodynamic torque converter, a lockup clutch with controlled slip capability and two wet multi-plate clutches to engage the input shafts of the transmission. The device is intended to overcome the deficiencies associated with using conventional dry or wet launch clutches in DCT's, such as limited torque capacity at vehicle launch, clutch thermal capacity and cooling, launch shudder, lubricant quality and requirement for interval oil changes. The alternative device enhances drive quality and performance at vehicle launch and adds the capability of controlled capacity slip to attenuate gear rattle without early downshifting. Parasitic torque loss will increase but is shown not to drastically influence fuel consumption compared to a dry clutch system, however synchronizer engagement can become a concern at cold operating temperatures.
Technical Paper

Automatic Transmission Rotational Inertia Effect on Shift Quality

2011-04-12
2011-01-0393
The achievable shift quality of a modern automatic transmission may be greatly affected by the equivalent rotational inertia of the gearbox and driveline components. New, more mass- and packaging-efficient higher number of gear powerflows are being developed. These new architectures often result in more components being attached to a given rotational node. The rotational speed multiplication of the components must be considered when determining their inertial torque contribution to a given speed change event. An example of this multiplication effect is presented, with a discussion of the resulting impact to shift quality disturbance. Opportunities to address the negative aspects of the higher inertial torque contribution to transmission output shaft disturbance are discussed. Coordination of engine torque control and clutch torque control is presented as a viable strategy to improve shift quality.
Technical Paper

Controls Development for Clutch-Assisted Engine Starts in a Parallel Hybrid Electric Vehicle

2011-04-12
2011-01-0870
In a parallel hybrid electric vehicle, higher fuel economy gains are typically achieved if significant electric drive (or engine-off) operation is possible, shifting the engine operating schedule so that it only runs at medium to high load for best efficiency. To enable efficient engine-off driving, a typical configuration will have a disconnect clutch between the engine and the rest of the driveline. In some configurations, when engine-on operation is requested the disconnect clutch is applied in conjunction with the traction motor/generator to crank the engine (i.e., a flying engine start). In this paper we describe the development of a control system for a flying engine start using an engine disconnect clutch. The clutch is located between the engine and electric motor, which is connected to the input of a multispeed transmission. We first describe an initial control algorithm evaluation using a driveline model.
Technical Paper

Model Based Torque Converter Clutch Slip Control

2011-04-12
2011-01-0396
To realize better fuel economy benefits from transmissions, car makers have started the application of torque converter clutch control in second gear and beyond, resulting in greater demand on the torque converter clutch (TCC) and its control system. This paper focuses on one aspect of the control of the torque converter clutch to improve fuel economy and faster response of the transmission. A TCC is implemented to control the slip between the pump and turbine of the torque converter, thereby increasing its energy transfer efficiency and increasing vehicle fuel economy. However, due to the non-linear nature of the torque converter fluid coupling, the slip feedback control has to be very active to handle different driver inputs and road-load conditions, such as different desired slip levels, changes in engine input torques, etc. This non-linearity requires intense calibration efforts to precisely control the clutch slip in all the scenarios.
Technical Paper

Dry Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT) Thermal Model

2015-04-14
2015-01-1144
Dual Clutch Transmissions (DCT) for passenger cars are being developed by OEMs and suppliers. The driving force is the improvement in fuel economy available from manual transmissions together with the comfort of automatic transmissions. A dry clutch system (dDCT) is currently the subject of research, development, and production implementation. One of the key issues in the development of a dDCT is clutch durability. In dry clutches with current linings, above a critical temperature, the friction system starts to suffer permanent damage. In addition, the clutch friction characteristics are a function of the clutch interface temperature. Because a reliable, low-cost temperature sensor is not available for this application, the clutch control engineers rely on a good thermal model to estimate the temperature of the clutches. A thermal model was developed for dry dual clutch transmissions to predict operating temperature of both pressure and center plates during all maneuvers.
Journal Article

Performance Characterization of a Triple Input Clutch, Layshaft Automatic Transmission Using Energy Analysis

2013-12-15
2013-01-9042
This paper details the design and operating attributes of a triple input clutch, layshaft automatic transmission (TCT) with a torque converter in a rear wheel drive passenger vehicle. The objectives of the TCT design are to reduce fuel consumption while increasing acceleration performance through the design of the gearing arrangement, shift actuation system and selection of gear ratios and progression. A systematic comparison of an 8-speed TCT design is made against a hypothetical 8-speed planetary automatic transmission (AT) with torque converter using an energy analysis model based upon empirical data and first principles of vehicle-powertrain systems. It was found that the 8-speed TCT design has the potential to provide an approximate 3% reduction in fuel consumption, a 3% decrease in 0-100 kph time and 30% reduction in energy loss relative to a comparable 8-speed planetary AT with an idealized logarithmic ratio progression.
Journal Article

Dynamic Torque Characteristics of the Hydrodynamic Torque Converter

2011-05-17
2011-01-1540
The objective of this investigation is to characterize the torsional characteristics of the hydrodynamic torque converter. Analytical and experimental techniques are used to quantify the relationship between torsional oscillations imposed on the pump to those at the turbine as a function of frequency, operating point and design. A detailed model of the hydrodynamic torque converter based upon one-dimensional flow theory is used to establish fundamental torsional behavior independent of the downstream mechanical system. A simplified linear spring-mass-damper representation of the hydrodynamic torque converter is derived whose coefficients are proportional to pump speed for a particular design. A transmission dynamometer test cell with the capability to produce torsional oscillations was used to develop frequency response functions for various torque converters in a transmission, operating at steady state conditions.
Journal Article

Torque Converter Clutch Optimization: Improving Fuel Economy and Reducing Noise and Vibration

2011-04-12
2011-01-0146
The torque converter and torque converter clutch are critical devices governing overall power transfer efficiency in automatic transmission powertrains. With calibrations becoming more aggressive to meet increasing fuel economy standards, the torque converter clutch is being applied over a wider range of driving conditions. At low engine speed and high engine torque, noise and vibration concerns originating from the driveline, powertrain or vehicle structure can supersede aggressive torque converter clutch scheduling. Understanding the torsional characteristics of the torque converter clutch and its interaction with the drivetrain can lead to a more robust design, operation in regions otherwise restricted by noise and vibration, and potential fuel economy improvement.
X