Refine Your Search

Topic

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 16 of 16
Technical Paper

Estimating Variation in Roof Strength Test

2011-04-12
2011-01-1120
As part of the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, requirements for roof strength need to be met for all vehicles. On the other hand, automobile manufactures need to minimize vehicle mass for fuel economy and other objectives. It is important, therefore, for manufacturers to have a good understanding of the sources of variation in measured roof strength. An accurate estimation of such variation is important to achieving these objectives. This paper presents a method of using CAE simulation and vehicle tests to effectively estimate the range of variability in the roof crush tests. A number of vehicle and test variables which could potentially affect the measured roof strength were chosen, and their sensitivity was evaluated through CAE simulation. This knowledge of the sensitivity was then used to design a small number of vehicle tests, producing an estimation of the variation range in roof strength.
Technical Paper

Hood Slam Process Automator

2011-04-12
2011-01-1066
This paper deals with the development of a Hood Slam Process Automator (PA) to automate the pre-processing tasks of the virtual slam assessment with non-linear Nastran Transient Sol. 129 on all types of hoods. The slam analysis generally consumes a lot of analyst's time for building the slam models, typically six hours and is very tedious and has the potential for errors. The Hood Slam PA will automatically create and perform slam analysis pre-processing tasks within HyperMesh software such as creating latch striker interface, creating seals and bumpers with CBUSH1D elements, assigning transient slam speed to the hood and will finally generate the Nastran non-linear transient (Sol.129) hood slam analysis input files. The ready to run analysis input files will be submitted to the Nastran solver and the analysis results will then be post processed using HyperView software.
Technical Paper

Robust Design of a Light Weight Flush Mount Roof Rack

2011-04-12
2011-01-1274
Roof racks are designed for carrying luggage during customers' travels. These rails need to be strong enough to be able to carry the luggage weight as well as be able to withstand aerodynamic loads that are generated when the vehicle is travelling at high speeds on highways. Traditionally, roof rail gage thickness is increased to account for these load cases (since these are manufactured by extrusion), but doing so leads to increased mass which adversely affects fuel efficiency. The current study focuses on providing the guidelines for strategically placing lightening holes and optimizing gage thickness so that the final design is robust to noise parameters and saves the most mass without adversely impacting wind noise performance while minimizing stress. The project applied Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) techniques to optimize roof rail parameters in order to improve the load carrying capacity while minimizing mass.
Technical Paper

Design, Analysis, and Development Testing of Large Hood Plastic Mounted Trim Components

2011-04-12
2011-01-0490
Large hood mounted plastic trim components are subjected to complex and often extreme loading conditions. Typical loading conditions include solar and thermal cycling, as well as road and powertrain induced vibrations, aero lift and buffeting, and mechanical loads such as car wash. For the above components understanding and classifying the typical loading conditions is an essential and important step in achieving long term quality. This paper discusses different approaches to the design, analysis, development, and testing of plastic trim components. Samples of analysis and test results are presented to demonstrate how to identify and prevent the loss of the part function. Some useful guidelines and practices for addressing thermal expansion, dimensional variation, and redundancy in attachments are also discussed.
Technical Paper

Structural-Acoustic Analysis of Vehicle Body Panel Participation to Interior Acoustic Boom Noise

2011-04-12
2011-01-0496
A structural-acoustic finite element model of an automotive vehicle is developed and applied to evaluate the effect of structural and acoustic modifications to reduce low-frequency ‘boom’ noise in the passenger compartment. The structural-acoustic model is developed from a trimmed body structural model that is coupled with an acoustic model of the passenger compartment and trunk cavities. The interior noise response is computed for shaker excitation loads at the powertrain mount attachment locations on the body. The body panel and modal participation diagrams at the peak response frequencies are evaluated. A polar diagram identifies the dominant body panel contributions to the ‘boom’ noise. A modal participation diagram determines the body modes that contribute to the ‘boom’ noise. Finally, structural and acoustic modifications are evaluated to determine their effect on reducing the ‘boom’ noise and on the overall lower-frequency sound pressure level response.
Technical Paper

Pressure Sensor Simulation Capability for Side Impact Sensing Calibration

2011-04-12
2011-01-0105
There is a growing interest in using pressure sensors to sense side impacts, where the pressure change inside the door cavity is monitored and used to discriminate trigger and non-trigger incidents. In this paper, a pressure sensor simulation capability for side impact sensing calibration is presented. The ability to use simulations for side impact sensing calibration early in the vehicle program development process could reduce vehicle development cost and time. It could also help in evaluating sensor locations by studying the effects of targeted impact points and contents in the door cavity. There are two modeling methods available in LS-DYNA for predicting pressure change inside a cavity, namely airbag method and fluid structure interaction method. A suite of side impact calibration events of a study vehicle were simulated using these two methods. The simulated door cavity pressure time histories were then extracted to calibrate the side sensing system of the study vehicle.
Technical Paper

Door Check Load Durability - Fatigue Life Prediction

2011-04-12
2011-01-0790
This paper describes an analytical methodology for predicting the fatigue life of a door system for check load durability cycles. A check stop load durability cycle occurs when a customer opens the door beyond the door detent position with a force applied on the check link or hinge check stops. This method combines Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model and fatigue code to compute the durability requirements. The FEA model consists of Door-in-White (DIW) on body with integrated hinge check link or independent check link. Nonlinear material, geometric and parts contact were considered for the door with body-in-white (BIW). Several door hinge designs, with integrated and independent check links, were investigated. Using the Von Mises stress and plastic strain from the above analysis, the fatigue life was predicted and compared with the test data. Integrating FEA and fatigue allows predicting the threshold total strain value, which is developed, for check load durability requirements.
Technical Paper

A Displacement-Approach for Liftgate Chucking Investigation

2012-04-16
2012-01-0217
A displacement-based CAE analysis is applied to liftgate chucking noise problems. A CAE simulation model of a small-size sport utility vehicle (SUV) is simulated with a set of realistic road loads as a time transient simulation. The model contains a trimmed vehicle, a liftgate and structural body-liftgate interface components such as the latch-striker wire, contact wedges and slam bumpers. Simulation design of experiments (DOE) is carried out with the model. As performance measures, the relative displacements at the contact points of the interface components are selected, since they are considered the direct cause of liftgate chucking. As design variables, body structure stiffness, liftgate stiffness, liftgate opening stiffness, stiffness characteristics of the interface components and additional liftgate mass are selected. Results of the simulation DOE is post-processed, and response surface models (RSM) are fit for the performance measures.
Technical Paper

J2716 SENT - Single Edge Nibble Transmission, Updates and Status

2011-04-12
2011-01-1034
The SAE J2716 SENT (Single Edge Nibble Transmission) Protocol has entered production with a number of announced products. The SENT protocol is a point-to-point scheme for transmitting signal values from a sensor to a controller. It is intended to allow for high resolution data transmission with a lower system cost than available serial data solution. The SAE SENT Task Force has developed a number of enhancements and clarifications to the original specification which are summarized in this paper.
Journal Article

Numerical Investigation of Buoyancy-Driven Flow in a Simplified Underhood with Open Enclosure

2013-04-08
2013-01-0842
Numerical results are presented for simulating buoyancy driven flow in a simplified full-scale underhood with open enclosure in automobile. The flow condition is set up in such a way that it mimics the underhood soak condition, when the vehicle is parked in a windbreak with power shut-down after enduring high thermal loads due to performing a sequence of operating conditions, such as highway driving and trailer-grade loads in a hot ambient environment. The experimental underhood geometry, although simplified, consists of the essential components in a typical automobile underhood undergoing the buoyancy-driven flow condition. It includes an open enclosure which has openings to the surrounding environment from the ground and through the top hood gap, an engine block and two exhaust cylinders mounted along the sides of the engine block. The calculated temperature and velocity were compared with the measured data at different locations near and away from the hot exhaust plumes.
Journal Article

Boundary Condition Effect on the Correlation of an Acoustic Finite Element Passenger Compartment Model

2011-04-12
2011-01-0506
Three different acoustic finite element models of an automobile passenger compartment are developed and experimentally assessed. The three different models are a traditional model, an improved model, and an optimized model. The traditional model represents the passenger and trunk compartment cavities and the coupling between them through the rear seat cavity. The improved model includes traditional acoustic models of the passenger and trunk compartments, as well as equivalent-acoustic finite element models of the front and rear seats, parcel shelf, door volumes, instrument panel, and trunk wheel well volume. An optimized version of the improved acoustic model is developed by modifying the equivalent-acoustic properties. Modal analysis tests of a vehicle were conducted using loudspeaker excitation to identify the compartment cavity modes and sound pressure response to 500 Hz to assess the accuracy of the acoustic models.
Journal Article

Structural Optimization for Vehicle Dynamics Loadcases

2011-04-12
2011-01-0058
As mass reduction becomes an increasingly important enabler for fuel economy improvement, having a robust structural development process that can comprehend Vehicle Dynamics-specific requirements is correspondingly important. There is a correlation between the stiffness of the body structure and the performance of the vehicle when evaluated for ride and handling. However, an unconstrained approach to body stiffening will result in an overly-massive body structure. In this paper, the authors employ loads generated from simulation of quasi-static and dynamic vehicle events in ADAMS, and exercise structural finite element models to recover displacements and deflected shapes. In doing so, a quantitative basis for considering structural vehicle dynamics requirements can be established early in the design/development process.
Journal Article

Development of Liftgate Hinge-to-Roof Sealing Gasket Material for Uncoated Steel Roof Panels

2011-04-12
2011-01-0072
The sealing of a lift gate hinge to the body structure is necessary to avoid both the onset of corrosion and to avoid water intrusion into the interior compartment. The hinge-to-body interface typically involves horizontal metal-to-metal surface contact, creating the perfect environment for moisture entrapment and corrosion initiation. The choice of body panel material (uncoated (bare) steel vs. coated (galvanized) steel) drives different sealing approaches especially when considering corrosion avoidance.
Journal Article

Evaluation of Dynamic Roof Deformation in Rollover Crash Tests

2011-04-12
2011-01-1093
Although the measured amount of roof deformation associated with a given rollover crash test is often the residual or post test deformation, rollover crash test researchers are aware that roof deformation occurs dynamically throughout the rollover event with varying magnitude. The challenge to quantifying dynamic roof deformation has been the lack of a reliable method to measure and record the dynamic roof deformation during the rollover test. Researchers have explored various methods to measure dynamic roof deformation including the use of film analysis of external targets, accelerometers, string potentiometers, and 3D photogrammetry. This paper discusses a series of simulated curb trip rollover tests conducted to study and compare different methodologies to measure and record dynamic roof deformation.
Journal Article

Variable and Fixed Airflow for Vehicle Cooling

2011-04-12
2011-01-1340
This paper describes rationale for determining the apportionment of variable or ‘shuttered’ airflow and non-variable or static airflow through openings in the front of a vehicle as needed for vehicle cooling. Variable airflow can be achieved by means of a shutter system, which throttles airflow through the front end and into the Condenser, Radiator, and Fan Module, (CRFM). Shutters originated early in the history of the auto industry and acted as a thermostat [1]. They controlled airflow as opposed to coolant flow through the radiator. Two benefits that are realized today are aerodynamic and thermal gains, achieved by restricting unneeded cooling airflow. Other benefits exist and justify the use of shutters; however, there are also difficulties in both execution and practical use. This paper will focus on optimizing system performance and execution in terms of the two benefits of reduced aerodynamic drag and reduced mechanical drag through thermal control.
Technical Paper

Effects of Thickness on Headliner Material Properties

2011-04-12
2011-01-0463
Headliner material plays an important role in occupant protection in situations involving head impact into the interior vehicle roof area. Accurate characterization of its mechanical properties is therefore extremely important for prediction of its behavior during interior impact assessment of a vehicle. Headliner material typically consists of two main layers: the substrate layer which provides structural integrity and impact protection, and the fabric-foam layer which provides proper interior fit and appearance. Both layers vary significantly in thickness and composition between different manufacturers. This paper investigates effects of the layer thickness on compressive strength and deformation of several different headliner materials.
X