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Technical Paper

Effects of Fretting Corrosion on Lift Glass

2011-04-12
2011-01-1434
The electrical architecture design of a rear back glass defrost grid system encompasses many critical criteria that must be integrated into the design. For example, the defrost clip location and interface to the glass must meet all vehicle performance requirements. If the defrost clip to the glass interface is not resistant to vibration and relative movement, detachment and loss of function can occur. This paper describes a back glass defrost clip with a solder joint that is robust to manufacturing variations and customer usage conditions. A designed experiment using Design for Six Sigma methodologies was performed to understand the effects of the attachment interface to the electrical wiring pigtail, and parameters that affect performance. The working constraints, testing set up, validation, and root cause investigation of the clip detachment phenomenon is covered in this paper.
Technical Paper

Technical Challenges in Future Electrical Architectures

2011-04-12
2011-01-1021
As part of standardizing the global portfolio, General Motors (GM) created an electrical architecture that will support the GM global product feature set. Introduced in 2009, this common electrical architecture is already being applied to multiple platforms in GM's regional engineering centers. The electrical architecture will be updated regularly to address the needs of new features in the automotive market and to take advantage of the latest technology advancements. The functional requirements of these new features result in technology challenges. In addition, many new features may result in challenges to the vehicle electrical architecture or the vehicle development process. The challenges have been evaluated so that needs and initiatives can be better understood.
Technical Paper

High Voltage Power Allocation Management of Hybrid/Electric Vehicles

2011-04-12
2011-01-1022
As the automotive industry moves toward producing more advanced hybrid/electric vehicles, high voltage Rechargeable Energy Storage Systems (RESS) are now being implemented as the main power source of the vehicle, replacing the need for the traditional Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) altogether or just during certain parts of a drive cycle. With this type of architecture, it is becoming a necessity to equip these vehicles with devices that can draw their power from the high voltage (HV) RESS. These HV devices are not only used to support the propulsion of the vehicle but to perform other necessary vehicle functions as well. With demands of high voltage power from multiple systems ranging from RESS thermal conditioning, cabin thermal conditioning, RESS charging, and vehicle propulsion, power demands can exceed the available power of the vehicle. This creates a perplexing problem of how to manage the high voltage power consumption between the different vehicle systems.
Technical Paper

Comprehensive Overview of Human Interface for an Extended Range Electric Vehicle

2011-04-12
2011-01-1023
An Extended Range Electric vehicle brings a wealth of new features since it is capable of driving on battery alone, has a range extending engine, and has a high voltage battery pack that can be recharged by plugging into wall power. The customer is able to interact with the vehicle's plug-in charging system through mobile applications. Along with all these new features is the challenge of designing a driver interface to provide important information to the customer. This paper will describe the unique customer interface features added to the vehicle, and will include some additional specifics related to the hardware used to provide the information.
Technical Paper

Impact of Motor Capacitance on Vehicle Electrical System Transients

2011-04-12
2011-01-1009
The electrical architecture of today's automobiles employs a significant number of fractional horsepower motors to control wipers, windows, seats, etc. The typical motors are permanent magnet DC brush-commutated motors, often referred to as BM motors. These BM motors, while simple in design, have the inherent issue of creating short-duration, high-frequency electrical noise (caused by the constant interruption, or commutation, of the motor current). This electrical noise can readily lead to radio reception interference. In order to protect against this risk, a typical solution is to install a radio frequency (RF) filter internal to the motor. This filter generally includes a high-frequency ceramic or metal film capacitor across the motor terminals that connect to the vehicle electrical system.
Technical Paper

Fault-Tree Generation for Embedded Software Implementing Dual-Path Checking

2011-04-12
2011-01-1004
Given the fast changing market demands, the growing complexity of features, the shorter time to market, and the design/development constraints, the need for efficient and effective verification and validation methods are becoming critical for vehicle manufacturers and suppliers. One such example is fault-tree analysis. While fault-tree analysis is an important hazard analysis/verification activity, the current process of translating design details (e.g., system level and software level) is manual. Current experience indicates that fault tree analysis involves both creative deductive thinking and more mechanical steps, which typically involve instantiating gates and events in fault trees following fixed patterns. Specifically for software fault tree analysis, a number of the development steps typically involve instantiating fixed patterns of gates and events based upon the structure of the code. In this work, we investigate a methodology to translate software programs to fault trees.
Technical Paper

Plug-In Charging Feature

2011-04-12
2011-01-1013
As the auto industry becomes more dependent upon Electric Vehicles (Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Battery Electric Vehicles, and Extended Range Electric Vehicles), the Plug-In Charging Feature will become an integral part of the driver's daily routine. The Plug-In Charging feature enables off-board electrical power grid (grid based) power to be used immediately or at a later time by on-vehicle functions. The primary use of this grid power is to charge the vehicle's High Voltage (HV) battery, but other uses also do exist. These functions will mainly be active when the vehicle is off.
Technical Paper

Probability of a Crash During Plug-in Charging

2011-04-12
2011-01-1008
Plug-in electric vehicles are becoming increasingly popular as the U.S. and other nations look for ways to reduce the usage of petroleum fuels and reduce the carbon emission footprint. Though plug-in electric vehicles offer many advantages over conventional vehicles, they also present some unique potential hazards due to the presence of high voltage in the vehicle. Specifically, potential high voltage hazards can occur if the electric vehicle is crashed by another vehicle during its plug-in charging session. High voltage hazards include the possibility of electrical shock and thermal events as a result of electrical arcing that can cause injury or death to persons that operate or work around plug-in electric vehicles. Automotive Safety Integrity Level (ISO 26262), often abbreviated as ASIL, is used by the automotive industry for determining the ranking of safety hazards.
Technical Paper

FlexRay Active Star Network Integration Strategies and Host Interface Implementation

2011-04-12
2011-01-1027
The FlexRay serial data protocol is being considered in automotive vehicle architectures as an enabler for active safety, time critical systems due to the advantages it provides for time-determinism, increased data bandwidth, and multiple data channels to support fault tolerance strategies. To improve the robustness/availability of the electrical/physical layer when used for these critical applications, a FlexRay Active Star device is available. The Active Star is part of the physical layer and facilitates the creation of robust, fault tolerant network systems by partitioning the network into individual branches connected to one or more ECUs. This partitioning allows fault confinements and isolation activities to be performed at individual branches with minimal disruption to network communication. This paper describes the investigation of Active Star capabilities and some complexities related to their network integration.
Technical Paper

High Voltage Connect Feature

2011-04-12
2011-01-1266
Extended Range Electric Vehicles (EREVs), which are Off board charging capable Electric Vehicles (EV) with an on board charging generator, rely on very complex Rechargeable Energy Storage Systems (RESS) and High Voltage (HV) distribution systems to enable operation as both an EV and an EREV. The connect feature manages the connection and disconnection of a High Voltage (HV) Rechargeable Energy Storage System (RESS) to and from the high voltage components in the vehicle. The RESS is connected to the vehicle's high voltage system to enable vehicle operation. The HV connect feature is a part of occupant, service personnel and first responder safety for all General Motors vehicles that contain high voltage systems. Implementation of the connect feature is the method deployed in GM vehicles to meet high voltage FMVSS requirements.
Technical Paper

Application of Insulation Standards to High Voltage Automotive Applications

2013-04-08
2013-01-1528
Insulation coordination requirements for electrical equipment applications are defined in various standards. The standards are defined for application to stationary mains connected equipment, like IT, power supply or industrial equipment. Protection from an electric shock is considered the primary hazard in these standards. These standards have also been used in the design of various automotive components. IEC 60664-1 is an example of the standard. Automobiles are used across the world, in various environments and in varied usage by the customers. Automobiles need to consider possible additional hazards including electric shock. This paper will provide an overview of how to adapt these standards for automotive application in the design of High Voltage (HV) automotive components, including High Voltage batteries and other HV components connected to the battery. The basic definitions from the standards and the principles are applied for usage in automotive applications.
Technical Paper

FlexRay Design Metrics for Early Design Validation

2011-04-12
2011-01-0452
In-vehicle electronics is displacing the traditional mechanical interfaces and as a result, electrical architecture design is evolving and getting more complex due to increase in automotive electronic content. Several embedded communication protocols are used to build an electrical architecture, with predominant use of Controlled Area Network (CAN) and Local Interconnection Network (LIN). Demand for new electrical features is increasing, to meet and to exceed the customer expectations and also to adapt to new evolving electronic technologies. To accommodate future electrical content, the need for communication bandwidth is increasing at an exponential rate. In addition, some of the safety-critical features require predictability and deterministic network behavior. Current protocols are not capable of satisfying these demands. FlexRay protocol can address these needs with higher bandwidth and determinism.
Technical Paper

Metrics for Quantifying and Evaluating Ability of Electronic Control System Architectures to Accommodate Changes

2011-04-12
2011-01-0447
Recent trends in the automotive industry show growing demands for the introduction of new in-vehicle features (e.g., smart-phone integration, adaptive cruise control, etc.) at increasing rates and with reduced time-to-market. New technological developments (e.g., in-vehicle Ethernet, multi-core technologies, AUTOSAR standardized software architectures, smart video and radar sensors, etc.) provide opportunities as well as challenges to automotive designers for introducing and implementing new features at lower costs, and with increased safety and security. As a result, the design of Electrical/Electronic (E/E) architectures is becoming increasingly challenging as several hardware resources are needed. In our earlier work, we have provided top-level definitions for three relevant metrics that can be used to evaluate E/E architecture alternatives in the early stages of the design process: flexibility, scalability and expandability.
Technical Paper

High Voltage Hybrid Battery Tray Design Optimization

2011-04-12
2011-01-0671
Hybrid high voltage battery pack is not only heavy mass but also large in dimension. It interacts with the vehicle through the battery tray. Thus the battery tray is a critical element of the battery pack that interfaces between the battery and the vehicle, including the performances of safety/crash, NVH (modal), and durability. The tray is the largest and strongest structure in the battery pack holding the battery sections and other components including the battery disconnect unit (BDU) and other units that are not negligible in mass. This paper describes the mass optimization work done on one of the hybrid batteries using CAE simulation. This was a multidisciplinary optimization project, in which modal performance and fatigue damage were accessed through CAE analysis at both the battery pack level, and at the vehicle level.
Technical Paper

Voltec Charging System EMC Requirements and Test Methodologies

2011-04-12
2011-01-0742
With the advent of vehicle manufacturer driven on-board charging systems for plug-in and extended range electric vehicles, such as the Chevrolet Volt, important considerations need to be comprehended in both the requirements specified as well as the test methodologies and setups for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Typical automotive EMC standards (such as the SAE J551 and SAE J1113 series) that cover 12 volt systems have existed for many years. Additionally, there has been some development in recent years for high voltage EMC for automotive applications. However, on-board charging for vehicles presents yet another challenge in adopting requirements that have typically been in the consumer industry realm and merging those with both the traditional 12 V based system requirements as well as high voltage based systems.
Technical Paper

Modeling and Analysis of Electromagnetic Coupling Between Electric Propulsion System Components

2011-04-12
2011-01-0756
The engineering of electric propulsion systems requires time and cost efficient methodologies to determine system characteristics as well as potential component integration issues. A significant part of this analysis is the identification of the electromagnetic fields present in the propulsion system. Understanding of the electromagnetic fields during system operation is a significant design consideration due to the use of components that require large current(s) and high voltage(s) in the proximity of other control system items (such as sensors) that operate with low current(s) and voltage(s). Therefore, it is critical to quantify the electromagnetic fields produced by these components within the design and how they may interact with other system components. Often overlooked (and also extremely important) is an evaluation of how the overall system architecture can generate or react to electromagnetic fields (which may be a direct result of packaging approaches).
Technical Paper

A Methodology for Evaluating Body Architecture Concepts Using Technical Cost Modeling

2011-04-12
2011-01-0767
The ability to make accurate decisions concerning early body-in-white architectures is critical to an automaker since these decisions often have long term cost and weight impacts. We address this need with a methodology which can be used to assist in body architecture decisions using process-based technical cost modeling (TCM) as a filter to evaluate alternate designs. Despite the data limitations of early design concepts, TCM can be used to identify key trends for cost-effectiveness between design variants. A compact body-in-white architecture will be used as a case study to illustrate this technique. The baseline steel structure will be compared to several alternate aluminum intensive structures in the context of production volume.
Technical Paper

On Board Jump Start for Belted Alternator Starter Hybrids

2011-04-12
2011-01-0867
The On Board Jump Start feature utilized on GM's Belt Alternator Starter (BAS) hybrids takes advantage of the High Voltage (HV) battery and other HV propulsion systems to supplement a low 12V battery during starting events. This feature has the potential to eliminate the need for an off vehicle 12V power source, such as a 2nd vehicle, to start the vehicle when the 12V battery is low.
Technical Paper

Feature Based Architecture Design and Functional Partitioning to Subsystems

2012-04-16
2012-01-0011
Vehicle development typically occurs by independently documenting requirements for individual subsystems, then packaging these subsystems into the vehicle and testing the feature operation at a higher level, across multiple subsystems. Many times, this independent development process results in integration problems at the vehicle level, such as incomplete feature execution, unexpected operation and information disconnects. The development team is left to debug and create inefficient patches at the vehicle level due to time constraints and / or planned release dates. Without architecting solutions at the feature level, miscommunication of expected feature operation leads to wasted time, re-work and customer dissatisfaction. While the development of vehicle level technical specifications provide feature expectations at the vehicle level, they do not solve the problem of how this operation is to be applied across multiple systems.
Technical Paper

Methods and Tools for End-to-End Latency Analysis and Optimization of a Dual-Processor Control Module

2012-04-16
2012-01-0029
Automotive HW/SW architectures are becoming increasingly complex to support the deployment of new safety, comfort, and energy-efficiency features. Such architectures include several software tasks (100+), messages (1000+), computational and communication resources (70+ CPUs, 10+ buses), and (smart) sensors and actuators (20+). To cope with the increasing system complexity at lowest development and product costs, highest safety, and fastest time to market, model-based rapid-prototyping development processes are essential. The processes, coupled with optimization steps aimed at reducing the number of software and hardware resources while satisfying the safety requirements, enable reduction of the system complexity and ease downstream testing/validation efforts. This paper describes a novel model-based design exploration and optimization process for the deployment of a set of software tasks on a dual-processor control module implementing a fail-safe strategy.
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