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Technical Paper

Vehicle Acoustic Sensitivity Performance Using Virtual Engineering

2011-04-12
2011-01-1072
In order to assess the possible ways of energy transfer from the various sources of excitation in a vehicle assembly to a given target location, frequency based substructuring technique and transfer path analysis are used. These methods help to locate the most important energy transfer paths for a specific problem, and to evaluate their individual effects on the target, thus providing valuable insight into the mechanisms responsible for the problem. The Source-Path-Receiver concept is used. The sources can be from the road surface, engine, transmission, transfer case, prop-shaft, differential, rotating components, chain drives, pumps, etc., and the receiver can be driver/passenger ears, steering column, seats, etc. This paper is devoted to identify the noise transfer paths and the force transmissibility among the interfaces of different components in the vehicle for the low to mid frequency range.
Technical Paper

Robust Design of a Light Weight Flush Mount Roof Rack

2011-04-12
2011-01-1274
Roof racks are designed for carrying luggage during customers' travels. These rails need to be strong enough to be able to carry the luggage weight as well as be able to withstand aerodynamic loads that are generated when the vehicle is travelling at high speeds on highways. Traditionally, roof rail gage thickness is increased to account for these load cases (since these are manufactured by extrusion), but doing so leads to increased mass which adversely affects fuel efficiency. The current study focuses on providing the guidelines for strategically placing lightening holes and optimizing gage thickness so that the final design is robust to noise parameters and saves the most mass without adversely impacting wind noise performance while minimizing stress. The project applied Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) techniques to optimize roof rail parameters in order to improve the load carrying capacity while minimizing mass.
Technical Paper

Structural-Acoustic Analysis of Vehicle Body Panel Participation to Interior Acoustic Boom Noise

2011-04-12
2011-01-0496
A structural-acoustic finite element model of an automotive vehicle is developed and applied to evaluate the effect of structural and acoustic modifications to reduce low-frequency ‘boom’ noise in the passenger compartment. The structural-acoustic model is developed from a trimmed body structural model that is coupled with an acoustic model of the passenger compartment and trunk cavities. The interior noise response is computed for shaker excitation loads at the powertrain mount attachment locations on the body. The body panel and modal participation diagrams at the peak response frequencies are evaluated. A polar diagram identifies the dominant body panel contributions to the ‘boom’ noise. A modal participation diagram determines the body modes that contribute to the ‘boom’ noise. Finally, structural and acoustic modifications are evaluated to determine their effect on reducing the ‘boom’ noise and on the overall lower-frequency sound pressure level response.
Technical Paper

Radiated Fuel Tank Slosh Noise Simulation

2011-04-12
2011-01-0495
With the introduction of hybrid vehicles and the associated elimination of engine and exhaust masking noises, sounds from other sources is becoming more noticeable. Fuel tank sloshing is one of these sources. Fuel sloshing occurs when a vehicle is accelerated in any direction and can create noise that may be perceived as a quality issue by the customer. To reduce slosh noise, a fuel tank has to be carefully designed. Reduction in slosh noise using test- based methods can be very costly and timely. This paper shows how, using the combination of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamic), FE (Finite Element) and Acoustic simulation methods, the radiated fuel tank slosh noise performance can be evaluated using CAE methods. Although the de-coupled fluid /structure interaction (FSI) method was used for the examples in this paper, the acoustic simulation method is not limited to the decoupled FSI method.
Technical Paper

The Simulation of Air Induction Noise Using 1D-3D Coupling

2011-04-12
2011-01-0500
Compartment noise has gained significant importance to meet customer expectation. One of the sources of noise is air intake noise. Intake noise is produced by both opening and closing of the inlet valve. This makes source noise critical to the development of air induction system. The new approach has been thought for noise analysis of Air Induction System (AIS) to identify source noise using 1D-3D coupling. It is very difficult to simulate engine and air induction system in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) due to complexities in geometry. The objective of the present study is to predict the pulsed noise and flow noise using 1D-3D coupling. The engine with 1D code and AIS with 3D CFD code is simulated. Engine pulsation from GT-Power is provided as an input boundary condition to ANSYS Fluent. GT-Power exchanges boundary values to 3D computation domain at each CFD time step through special connections. The CFD code is run with implicit discretisation scheme and SAS turbulence model.
Technical Paper

Drive Point Mobility, Transmissibility and Beyond

2011-04-12
2011-01-0502
Drive Point Mobility is commonly used in lab tests and structural analysis for the purposes of measuring and evaluating the N&V performance of a dynamic system. Unless the drive point itself is also the point of interest (for responses), the author finds that it can only provide very limited information about the whole system's dynamic / vibrational characteristics. Thus one should always try to measure, analyze, and then improve, instead of Drive Point Mobility alone, the non-drive point mobility or the generalized transmissibility as well, for their structural N&V performance. A simplified 3-DOF spring/mass/damper system is first used to illustrate the dynamic characters of the system. For more realistic structures, a FE model of the body/floor and (body side) hanger (for exhaust) is used. Then a more complete system model, consisting of a full exhaust, it's hangers/isolators, and part of the vehicle chassis/body/floor structure, is used in this paper to illustrate the above points.
Technical Paper

Small Amplitude Torsional Steering Column Dynamics on Smooth Roads: In-Vehicle Effects and Internal Sources

2011-04-12
2011-01-0560
Internally excited torsional steering wheel vibrations at frequencies near 8-22 Hz on smooth roads can produce driver disturbances, commonly described as “SHAKE”. These vibrations are primarily excited by the rotating front suspension corners and are periodic in the rotational frequencies of the tire-wheel assemblies. The combination of vehicular dynamic amplification originating in dominant suspension and steering system vibratory modes, and a sufficiently large 1st harmonic non-uniformity excitation of the rotating corner components, can result in periodic vibrations exceeding thresholds of disturbance. Controlling the periodic non-uniformity excitation through individual component requirements (e.g., wheel imbalance, tire force variation, wheel runout, concentric piloting of wheel on hub) is difficult since the desired upper limits of individual component requirements for vibration-free performance are typically beyond industry capability.
Technical Paper

Random Frequency Response Analysis of Battery Systems Using ‘Virtual Shaker Table’

2011-04-12
2011-01-0665
This paper presents ‘Virtual Shaker Table’: a CAE method that enables random frequency structural response and random vibration fatigue analyses of a battery system. The Virtual Shaker Table method is a practical and systematic procedure that effectively assesses battery system vibration performance prior to final design, build and testing. A random structural frequency response analysis identifies the critical frequencies and modes at which the battery system is excited by random inputs. Fatigue life may be predicted after PSD stresses have been ascertained. This method enables frequency response analysis techniques to be applied quickly and accurately, thereby allowing assessment of multiple design alternatives. Virtual Shaker Table facilitates an elegant solution to some of the significant challenges inherent to complex battery system design and integration.
Technical Paper

Optimum Constraint Strategy for Liftgates

2011-04-12
2011-01-0766
The present study defines the functional requirements for a liftgate and the body in order to avoid rattle, squeak, and other objectionable noises. A Design For Six Sigma (DFSS) methodology was used to study the impact of various constraint components such as bumpers, wedges, and isolated strikers on functional requirements. These functional requirements include liftgate frequency, acoustic cavity frequency, and the stiffness of the liftgate body opening. It has been determined that the method of constraining the gate relative to the body opening has a strong correlation to the noise generated. The recommended functional performance targets and constraint component selection have been confirmed by actual testing on a vehicle. Recommendations for future liftgate design will be presented.
Technical Paper

CAE-Based Approach for Oil Pan NVH Optimization of Compact Automotive Diesel Engines

2011-04-12
2011-01-0934
In the automotive industry, CAE methods are now widely used to predict several functional characteristics and to develop designs that are first-time-capable to meet programs targets. The N&V area is one of the increasing key factors for a product differentiation; costumers expect not only more powerful and more fuel efficient but also less noisy engines. The oil pan is one of the bigger contributors to engine radiated noise and to diesel knocking, so that great attention is paid within GM to optimize oil pans of Diesel engines by following a CAE-based approach to achieve a “first-time-capable” design for this component. This allows focusing the subsequent N&V testing activities to pinpoint modifications mainly on those components with shorter lead time. This paper describes the key-steps that are executed to optimize the oil pan design by using CAE methods with the main intent of reducing its noise radiation.
Technical Paper

Development of Robust CAE Modeling Technique for Decklid Slam Analysis

2011-04-12
2011-01-0242
Engineering has continuously strived to improve the vehicle development process to achieve high quality designs and quick to launch products. The design process has to have the tools and capabilities to help ensure both quick to the market product and a flawless launch. To achieve high fidelity and robust design, mistakes and other quality issues must be addressed early in the engineering process. One way to detect problems early is to use the math based modeling and simulation techniques of the analysis group. The correlation of the actual vehicle performance to the predictive model is crucial to obtain. Without high correlation, the change management process begins to get complicated and costs start to increase exponentially. It is critical to reduce and eliminate the risk in a design up front before tooling begins to kick off. The push to help achieve a high rate of correlation has been initiated by engineering management, seeing this as an asset to the business.
Journal Article

Boundary Condition Effect on the Correlation of an Acoustic Finite Element Passenger Compartment Model

2011-04-12
2011-01-0506
Three different acoustic finite element models of an automobile passenger compartment are developed and experimentally assessed. The three different models are a traditional model, an improved model, and an optimized model. The traditional model represents the passenger and trunk compartment cavities and the coupling between them through the rear seat cavity. The improved model includes traditional acoustic models of the passenger and trunk compartments, as well as equivalent-acoustic finite element models of the front and rear seats, parcel shelf, door volumes, instrument panel, and trunk wheel well volume. An optimized version of the improved acoustic model is developed by modifying the equivalent-acoustic properties. Modal analysis tests of a vehicle were conducted using loudspeaker excitation to identify the compartment cavity modes and sound pressure response to 500 Hz to assess the accuracy of the acoustic models.
Journal Article

Engine Diagnostics Using Acoustic Emissions Sensors

2016-04-05
2016-01-0639
Engine acoustics measured by microphones near the engine have been used in controlled laboratory settings for combustion feedback and even combustion phasing control, but the use of these techniques in a vehicle where many other noise sources exist is problematic. In this study, surface-mounted acoustic emissions sensors are embedded in the block of a 2.0L turbocharged GDI engine, and the signal is analyzed to identify useful feedback features. The use of acoustic emissions sensors, which have a very high frequency response and are commonly used for detecting material failures for health monitoring, including detecting gear pitting and ring scuffing on test stands, enables detection of acoustics both within the range of human hearing and in the ultrasonic spectrum. The high-speed acoustic time-domain data are synchronized with the crank-angle-domain combustion data to investigate the acoustic emissions response caused by various engine events.
Journal Article

Challenges for Tire Noise Evaluation on Common Pavements

2011-05-17
2011-01-1582
Developing common methods of noise evaluation and facilities can present a number of challenges in the area of tire/pavement noise. Some of the issues involved include the design and construction of pavements globally, the change in pavement over time, and variation in the noise produced with standard test tires used as references. To help understand and address these issues for airborne tire/pavement noise, acoustic intensity measurement methods based on the On-board Sound Intensity (OBSI) technique have been used. Initial evaluations have included measurements conducted at several different proving grounds. Also included were measurements taken on a 3m diameter tire noise dynamometer with surfaces replicating test track pavements. Variation between facilities appears to be a function of both design/construction and pavement age. Consistent with trends in the literature, for smooth asphalt surfaces, the newest surface produced levels lower than older surfaces.
Journal Article

Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Close-Coupled Pilot Injections to Reduce Combustion Noise in a Small-Bore Diesel Engine

2015-04-14
2015-01-0796
A pilot-main injection strategy is investigated for a part-load operating point in a single cylinder optical Diesel engine. As the energizing dwell between the pilot and main injections decreases below 200 μs, combustion noise reaches a minimum and a reduction of 3 dB is possible. This decrease in combustion noise is achieved without increased pollutant emissions. Injection schedules employed in the engine are analyzed with an injection analyzer to provide injection rates for each dwell tested. Two distinct injection events are observed even at the shortest dwell tested; rate shaping of the main injection occurs as the dwell is adjusted. High-speed elastic scattering imaging of liquid fuel is performed in the engine to examine initial liquid penetration rates.
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