Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 11 of 11
Technical Paper

A Study of Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female ATD Chest Accelerometers to Assess Sternum Compression Rate in Chest on Module Driver Out-of-Position Evaluations

2017-03-28
2017-01-1431
Driver out-of-position (OOP) tests were developed to evaluate the risk of inflation induced injury when the occupant is close to the airbag module during deployment. The Hybrid III 5th percentile female Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) measures both sternum displacement and chest acceleration through a potentiometer and accelerometers, which can be used to calculate sternum compression rate. This paper documents a study evaluating the chest accelerometers to assess punch-out loading of the chest during this test configuration. The study included ATD mechanical loading and instrumentation review. Finite element analysis was conducted using a Hybrid III - 5th percentile female ATD correlated to testing. The correlated restraint model was utilized with a Hybrid III - 50th percentile male ATD. A 50th percentile male Global Human Body Model (HBM) was then applied for enhanced anatomical review.
Technical Paper

CAE - A Strategy for a Large Scale Virtual Vehicle Engineering Factory

2011-04-12
2011-01-1065
For many years, the computer aided math model has been the foundation for lowering cost and reducing time to market for many manufacturing industries. The automotive industry applies a variety of tools and methods to evaluate the expected vehicle performance to a forever expanding set of requirements. These mathematical predictions of performance are then repeated for both a set of design cycles and a multitude of vehicles in the product portfolio. This paper presents a CAE perspective of the unique problems of the large scale virtual vehicle engineering factory and a set of solutions. Different strategies to create the various complex math models required are explored. These strategies include using COTS FEA pre-processers, producing FEA models internal to the CAD tools, as well as custom built tools, macros and process automation tools.
Technical Paper

Application of Failure Plastic Strain to Quasi-Static Finite Element Analysis for Projection Weld and Strain-based Spot Weld Evaluation

2011-04-12
2011-01-1074
One of the most critical and important fracture mechanisms in a FMVSS207/210/225[1] test is the pull-thru of bolts from the body structure or spot weld separation. There are no analytically proven methods of making a judgment of pull-thru occurring except through evaluation of the plastic strain or through the thickness strain value around projection welds on Weld nut/stud bolt or spot welds. Therefore it is essential to have accurate criteria to evaluate the pull-thru. During elastic deformation, the sheet steel deforms while the quasi-static force is being applied and then returns to its original shape when the force is released. But when the force causes a stress that exceeds the yield strength, the sheet steel will permanently elongate with each additional unit of force applied, and it will not return to its original shape and size.
Technical Paper

Optimization of High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet

2013-04-08
2013-01-1170
Traditional warm forming of aluminum refers to sheet forming in the temperature range of 200°C to 350°C using heated, matched die sets similar to conventional stamping. While the benefits of this process can include design freedom, improved dimensional capability and potentially reduced cycle times, the process is complex and requires expensive, heated dies. The objective of this work was to develop a warm forming process that both retains the benefits of traditional warm forming while allowing for the use of lower-cost tooling. Enhanced formability characteristics of aluminum sheet have been observed when there is a prescribed temperature difference between the die and the sheet; often referred to as a non-isothermal condition. This work, which was supported by the USCAR-AMD initiative, demonstrated the benefits of the non-isothermal warm forming approach on a full-scale door inner panel. Finite element analysis was used to guide the design of the die face and blank shape.
Technical Paper

A Fatigue Prediction Method for Spot Welded Joints

2013-04-08
2013-01-1208
Generally linear finite element analysis (FEA) is used to predict fatigue life of spot welded joints in a vehicle body structure. Therefore, the effect of plastic deformation at the vicinity of the spot welded joints is not included on fatigue prediction. This study introduces a simple technique to include the plastic deformation effect without performing elastic-plastic finite element analysis. The S-N curve obtained from fatigue test results is modified to consider this effect. Tensile strength test results of spot welded joint specimens were utilized to find the load range for FEA equivalent to the applied load range for fatigue tests. To demonstrate the proposed approach, fatigue test results of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) for lap-shear and coach peel specimens were used. Both the specimen types were tested at various constant amplitudes with the load ratios of R=0.1 and 0.3.
Technical Paper

Coolant Pipe Press Fit Study

2011-04-12
2011-01-0421
Coolant pipes are a prime connection units present in any engines that facilitates the flow of coolant and thereby keeping the engine under its optimum operating condition. Among the several influencing factors that deteriorate engines performance, the coolant leak is also one of the contributors. This could be caused primly due to leakage issues that arises from the pipe press fit zones. Henceforth it is very important to understand the root cause of this press-fit connection failure. The present study deals with press-fit between the pipe and housing in an engine which is subjected to extreme thermal loads (min of -40°C to a max temperature of +150°C) thereby causing the press-fit loosening effect.
Technical Paper

Modeling and Analysis of Electromagnetic Coupling Between Electric Propulsion System Components

2011-04-12
2011-01-0756
The engineering of electric propulsion systems requires time and cost efficient methodologies to determine system characteristics as well as potential component integration issues. A significant part of this analysis is the identification of the electromagnetic fields present in the propulsion system. Understanding of the electromagnetic fields during system operation is a significant design consideration due to the use of components that require large current(s) and high voltage(s) in the proximity of other control system items (such as sensors) that operate with low current(s) and voltage(s). Therefore, it is critical to quantify the electromagnetic fields produced by these components within the design and how they may interact with other system components. Often overlooked (and also extremely important) is an evaluation of how the overall system architecture can generate or react to electromagnetic fields (which may be a direct result of packaging approaches).
Technical Paper

Door Check Load Durability - Fatigue Life Prediction

2011-04-12
2011-01-0790
This paper describes an analytical methodology for predicting the fatigue life of a door system for check load durability cycles. A check stop load durability cycle occurs when a customer opens the door beyond the door detent position with a force applied on the check link or hinge check stops. This method combines Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model and fatigue code to compute the durability requirements. The FEA model consists of Door-in-White (DIW) on body with integrated hinge check link or independent check link. Nonlinear material, geometric and parts contact were considered for the door with body-in-white (BIW). Several door hinge designs, with integrated and independent check links, were investigated. Using the Von Mises stress and plastic strain from the above analysis, the fatigue life was predicted and compared with the test data. Integrating FEA and fatigue allows predicting the threshold total strain value, which is developed, for check load durability requirements.
Technical Paper

Dynamic Vehicle Durability Simulation and Applications using Modal Stress Methodology

2011-04-12
2011-01-0786
Dynamic modal frequency structural analysis incorporating ADAMS/Flex dynamic load prediction and structural modal stress can provide accurate dynamic stress history for fatigue analysis and synthesis. The amount of data input to finite element analysis is reduced significantly compared to traditional modal & direct transient finite element analysis techniques. Compared to traditional dynamic loads prediction, no additional simulation effort is required except for incorporating flexible body models of structural components into the ADAMS model. This structural analysis technique seamlessly comprehends the correct geometry and force boundary conditions together for long duration dynamic stress calculations. This technique also provided the solution for the deficiency of traditional quasi-static inertia relief method, which is particularly significant for structural system with either significant deformation or articulation.
Technical Paper

Effects of Gage Section Geometry on Tensile Material Properties by Digital Image Correlation

2012-04-16
2012-01-0184
Accurate material property data in both the elastic and plastic ranges of deformation is essential for accurate material representation in finite element simulations of vehicle systems. Variation of post formed material properties across a part are often of interest in different types of analyses, such as metal forming or fatigue life, for example. Depending on a part's shape it is not always possible to cut standard size tensile test specimens from all areas of interest across the part. Smaller size specimens with curved or tapered gage section may have to be used to promote strain localization and fracture at or near the gage center. This paper presents comparison of quasi-static tensile properties determined using two specimen gage section geometries, straight and tapered. Specifically, the following questions are addressed. How do the engineering strains computed from two-dimensional strain fields obtained by DIC compare to strains measured during standard tensile tests?
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Force-Based Spot Weld Modeling in Quasi-Static Finite Element Analysis

2012-04-16
2012-01-0537
Evaluating spot weld separation is one of the most challenging tasks in a quasi-static simulation. There are several factors that exist in modeling welds analytically that can influence correlation to physical test. This paper presents 4 specific factors: spot weld representation, weld thickness, weld strength, and metal forming effects around spot welds. There are many ways in which a spot weld can be modeled within an FEA model from mesh independent beams to mesh dependent hex clusters. While each modeling technique comes with its unique sets of advantages and disadvantages, a method is chosen to best balance correlation, model setup timing and computation time. Dependent on the way the thickness of the spot weld is represented, artificial moments can be induced which misrepresents structural behavior. The assigned yield strength of the spot weld influences the behavior of the joint.
X