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Journal Article

Automotive Brake Hose Fluid Consumption Characteristics and Its Effects on Brake System Pedal Feel

2010-04-12
2010-01-0082
During the automotive brake system design and development process, a large number of performance characteristics must be comprehended, assessed, and balanced against each other and, at times, competing performance objectives for the vehicle under development. One area in brake development that is critical to customer acceptance due to its impact on a vehicle's perceived quality is brake pedal feel. While a number of papers have focused on the specification, quantification and modeling of brake pedal feel and the various subsystem characteristics that affect it, few papers have focused specifically on brake corner hoses and their effect on pedal feel, in particular, during race-track conditions. Specifically, the effects of brake hose fluid consumption pedal travel and brake system response is not well comprehended during the brake development process.
Technical Paper

Diagnosis of Off-Brake Performance Issues with Low Range Pressure Distribution Sensors

2010-04-12
2010-01-0073
Brake caliper and corner behavior in the off-brake condition can lead, at times, to brake system performance issues such as residual drag (and related issues such as pulsation, judder, and loss of fuel economy), and caliper pryback during aggressive driving maneuvers. The dynamics in the brake corner can be strikingly complex, with numerous friction interfaces, rubber component and grease dynamics, deflections of multiple components, and significant dependence on usage conditions. Displacements of moving parts are usually small, and the residual forces in the caliper interfaces involved are also small in comparison with other forces acting on the same components, making direct observation very difficult. The present work attempts to illuminate off-brake behavior in two different conditions - residual drag and pryback - through the use of low-range pressure distribution sensors placed in between the caliper (pistons and fingers) and the brake pad pressure plates.
Technical Paper

Friction Damped Disc Brake Rotor

2010-04-12
2010-01-0077
Over the last five years, the automotive industry has experienced a trend towards niche performance vehicles equipped with high-output powertrains. These high performance vehicles also demand higher output braking systems. One method used to provide enhanced pedal feel and fade performance is to equip vehicles with higher apparent friction linings. The challenge then becomes how to design and manufacture these brake systems without high-frequency disc brake squeal and without paying a significant mass penalty. One alternative is to design disc brake rotors with increased damping. There are several options for increasing rotor damping. The classical approach is to increase the rotor's cast iron carbon content, thus increasing the internal material damping of the rotor. However, this methodology provides only a small increase in rotor damping. Alternatively, the rotor damping can be increased by introducing friction, sometimes referred to as Coulomb damping.
Journal Article

Analysis of Contamination Protection for Brake Rotor

2016-09-18
2016-01-1930
Contamination protection of brake rotors has been a challenge for the auto industry for a long time. As contamination of a rotor causes corrosion, and that in turn causes many issues like pulsation and excessive wear of rotors and linings, a rotor splash protection shield became a common part for most vehicles. While the rotor splash shield provides contamination protection for the brake rotor, it makes brake cooling performance worse because it blocks air reaching the brake rotor. Therefore, balancing between contamination protection and enabling brake cooling has become a key critical factor when the splash shield is designed. Although the analysis capability of brake cooling performance has become quite reliable, due to lack of technology to predict contamination patterns, the design of the splash protection shield has relied on engineering judgment and/or vehicle tests. Optimization opportunities were restricted by cost and time associated with vehicle tests.
Journal Article

High-Fidelity Transient Thermal Modeling of a Brake Corner

2016-09-18
2016-01-1929
There is an increasing interest in transient thermal simulations of automotive brake systems. This paper presents a high-fidelity CFD tool for modeling complete braking cycles including both the deceleration and acceleration phases. During braking, this model applies the frictional heat at the interface on the contacting rotor and pad surfaces. Based on the conductive heat fluxes within the surrounding parts, the solver divides the frictional heat into energy fluxes entering the solid volumes of the rotor and the pad. The convective heat transfer between the surfaces of solid parts and the cooling airflow is simulated through conjugate heat transfer, and the discrete ordinates model captures the radiative heat exchange between solid surfaces. It is found that modeling the rotor rotation using the sliding mesh approach provides more realistic results than those obtained with the Multiple Reference Frames method.
Technical Paper

Technical Potential for Thermally Driven Mobile A/C Systems

2001-03-05
2001-01-0297
Aqua-ammonia absorption refrigeration cycle and R-134a Vapor jet-ejector refrigeration cycle for automotive air-conditioning were studied and analyzed. Thermally activated refrigeration cycles would utilize combustion engine exhaust gas or engine coolant to supply heat to the generator. For the absorption system, the thermodynamic cycle was analyzed and pressures, temperatures, concentrations, enthalpies, and mass flow rates at every point were computed based on input parameters simulate practical operating conditions of vehicles. Then, heat addition to the generator, heat removal rates from absorber, condenser, and rectifying unit, and total rejection heat transfer area were all calculated. For the jet-ejector system, the optimum ejector vapor mass ratio based on similar input parameters was found by solving diffuser's conservation equations of continuity, momentum, energy, and flow through primary ejector nozzle simultaneously.
Technical Paper

Three-Dimensional Navier-Stokes Analysis of Front End Air Flow for a Simplified Engine Compartment

1992-06-01
921091
A computer code for predicting cooling air flow through the radiator and the condenser has been developed. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, together with the porous flow model for the radiator and the condenser, were solved to simulate front end air flow and the engine compartment flow simultaneously. These transport equations were discretized based on a finite-volume method in a transformed domain. The computational results for a simplified engine compartment showed overall flow information, such as the cooling air flow through the radiator and the condenser, the effects of an air dam, and the effects of fresh air vents near the top of the radiator and the condenser. Comparison of the available experimental data with the analysis showed excellent prediction of the cooling air flow through the radiator and the condenser.
Technical Paper

Analyzing Automotive Brake Components Using Birefringent Coating Technique

1993-03-01
930513
Engineers have used birefringent coating as a full field surface strain measuring tool for many years. The technique provides visual inspection of the structure on highly stressed areas that may lead to a potential structural failure. The usage of this technique for analysis of automotive brake components is very common. The recent development of the strain freezing technique extends further the capability of birefringent coating analysis. Hidden areas with high stresses can now be revealed for analysis.
Technical Paper

Computational Flow Analysis of Brake Cooling

1997-02-24
971039
Air flow around the front brake assembly was computed using STAR-CD version 2.300, a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code in order to explore the possibility of using this technique as a design tool. The primary objective in a brake corner assembly design is to maximize air cooling of the brake rotor. It is a very challenging task that requires experiments that are both expensive and time consuming in order to evaluate and optimize the various design possibilities. In this study, it is demonstrated that the design procedure can be shortened and made less expensive and be accurate using flow simulations. Accordingly, the air flow around the front brake assembly was computed for three different designs and for three different car speeds. A computational mesh was built using PROSTAR, the STAR-CD pre and post-processor. The three-dimensional mesh had almost 900,000 cells. All geometrical components were modelled.
Technical Paper

Impact of Engine Design on Vehicle Heating System Performance

1997-05-19
971839
A global thermal model of a vehicle powertrain is used to quantify how different engine design and powertrain calibration strategies influence the performance of a vehicle heating system. Each strategy is evaluated on its ability to improve the warm-up and heat rejection characteristics of a small-displacement, spark-ignition engine while minimizing any adverse effect on fuel consumption or emissions. An energy audit analysis shows that the two strategies having the greatest impact on heating system performance are advancing the spark and forcing the transmission to operate in a lower gear. Changes in head mass, exhaust port diameter, and coolant flow rate influence the coolant warm-up rate but have relatively little effect on steady state heat transfer at the heater core.
Technical Paper

Dual Fan Alternator Design Analysis

1996-02-01
960272
Component operating temperatures affect both the reliability and performance of automotive alternators. It is desirable to keep the rectifier bridge and regulator temperatures below 175 C because of the semiconductors contained in this area. At temperatures greater than this, expected lifespans have been observed to decay exponentially [1]. The air flow field surrounding an alternator and component temperature fields were investigated with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. The objectives of the simulations were to examine the velocity field for the flow passage and the temperature fields for the components. Design proposals have been made to improve the air flow and to reduce the operating temperature. An initial investigation was performed by setting an alternator in a test configuration and applying the appropriate heat generation for each component. The high temperatures in the alternator components occurred in the stator and the rectifier.
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