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Journal Article

Automotive Brake Hose Fluid Consumption Characteristics and Its Effects on Brake System Pedal Feel

2010-04-12
2010-01-0082
During the automotive brake system design and development process, a large number of performance characteristics must be comprehended, assessed, and balanced against each other and, at times, competing performance objectives for the vehicle under development. One area in brake development that is critical to customer acceptance due to its impact on a vehicle's perceived quality is brake pedal feel. While a number of papers have focused on the specification, quantification and modeling of brake pedal feel and the various subsystem characteristics that affect it, few papers have focused specifically on brake corner hoses and their effect on pedal feel, in particular, during race-track conditions. Specifically, the effects of brake hose fluid consumption pedal travel and brake system response is not well comprehended during the brake development process.
Technical Paper

Aeroacoustics of an Automotive A-Pillar Raingutter: A Numerical Study with the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings Method

2005-05-16
2005-01-2492
A numerical simulation of the flow structure around an idealized automotive A-pillar rain-gutter and the sound radiated from it is reported. The idealized rain-gutter is an infinitesimally thin backward facing elbow mounted on a flat plate. It is kept in a virtual wind-tunnel with rectangular cross-section. The transient flow structure around the rain-gutter is described and time-averaged pressure distribution along the base plate is provided. Time-varying static pressure was recorded on every grid point on the base-plate as well as the rain-gutter surfaces and used to calculate sound pressure signal at a microphone held above the rain-gutter using the Ffowcs-Williams-Hawkings (FWH) integral method was used for calculating sound propagation. Both the transient flow simulation as well as the FWH sound calculation were performed using the commercial CFD code FLUENT6.1.22.
Technical Paper

Vehicle Cross Wind Air Flow Analysis

1997-04-08
971517
CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) has been used to analyze vehicle air flow. In cross wind conditions an asymmetrical flow field around the vehicle is present. Under these circumstances, in addition to the forces present with symmetric air flow (drag and lift forces and pitching moment), side forces and moments (rolling and yawing) occur. Issues related to fuel economy, driveability, sealing effects (caused by suction exerted on the door), structural integrity (sun roof, spoiler), water management (rain deposit), and dirt deposit (shear stress) have been investigated. Due to the software developments and computer hardware improvements, results can be obtained within a reasonable time frame with excellent accuracy (both geometry and analytical solution). The flow velocity, streamlines, pressure field, and component forces can be extracted from the analysis results through visualization to identify potential improvement areas.
Technical Paper

Exhaust Tips Design Analysis

1997-04-08
971518
The air passages in tailpipe end geometries are investigated with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. The overall objective of the simulations is to select an optimum design which has a mimimum capacity for noise generation. This is accomplished by comparing pressure drops between inlet and outlet and by examining the turbulent kinetic energy levels in the flow domain. Two designs for the tailpipe end geometries were evaluated. It was found that turbulent kinetic energy levels and pressure drops were lowest in a single pipe design which had relatively smooth internal contours. We conclude that the present CFD approach can provide useful design information in a short time frame (a few weeks) for exhaust pipe tip geometries for reduced pressure drop and noise generation.
Journal Article

High-Fidelity Transient Thermal Modeling of a Brake Corner

2016-09-18
2016-01-1929
There is an increasing interest in transient thermal simulations of automotive brake systems. This paper presents a high-fidelity CFD tool for modeling complete braking cycles including both the deceleration and acceleration phases. During braking, this model applies the frictional heat at the interface on the contacting rotor and pad surfaces. Based on the conductive heat fluxes within the surrounding parts, the solver divides the frictional heat into energy fluxes entering the solid volumes of the rotor and the pad. The convective heat transfer between the surfaces of solid parts and the cooling airflow is simulated through conjugate heat transfer, and the discrete ordinates model captures the radiative heat exchange between solid surfaces. It is found that modeling the rotor rotation using the sliding mesh approach provides more realistic results than those obtained with the Multiple Reference Frames method.
Technical Paper

Piston Fuel Film Observations in an Optical Access GDI Engine

2001-05-07
2001-01-2022
A gasoline direct injection fuel spray was observed using a fired, optical access, square cross-section single cylinder research engine and high-speed video imaging. Spray interaction with the piston is described qualitatively, and the results are compared with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation results using KIVA-3V version 2. CFD simulations predicted that within the operating window for stratified charge operation, between 1% and 4% of the injected fuel would remain on the piston as a liquid film, dependent primarily on piston temperature. The experimental results support the CFD simulations qualitatively, but the amount of fuel film remaining on the piston appears to be under-predicted. High-speed video footage shows a vigorous spray impingement on the piston crown, resulting in vapor production.
Technical Paper

A Parametric Approach for Rapid Design and Analysis of Automotive HVAC Defrost Systems

2001-03-05
2001-01-0584
The overall vision of this project was to develop a new technology that will be an enabler to reduce design and development time of HVAC systems by an order of magnitude. The objective initially was to develop a parametric model of an automotive HVAC Windshield Defrost Duct coupled to a passenger compartment. It can be used early on in the design cycle for conducting coarse packaging studies by quickly exploring “what-if” design alternatives. In addition to the packaging studies, performance of these design scenarios can be quickly studied by undertaking CFD simulation and analyzing flow distribution and windshield melting patterns. The validated geometry and CFD models can also be used as knowledge building tools to create knowledge data warehouses or repositories for precious lessons learned.
Technical Paper

Technical Potential for Thermally Driven Mobile A/C Systems

2001-03-05
2001-01-0297
Aqua-ammonia absorption refrigeration cycle and R-134a Vapor jet-ejector refrigeration cycle for automotive air-conditioning were studied and analyzed. Thermally activated refrigeration cycles would utilize combustion engine exhaust gas or engine coolant to supply heat to the generator. For the absorption system, the thermodynamic cycle was analyzed and pressures, temperatures, concentrations, enthalpies, and mass flow rates at every point were computed based on input parameters simulate practical operating conditions of vehicles. Then, heat addition to the generator, heat removal rates from absorber, condenser, and rectifying unit, and total rejection heat transfer area were all calculated. For the jet-ejector system, the optimum ejector vapor mass ratio based on similar input parameters was found by solving diffuser's conservation equations of continuity, momentum, energy, and flow through primary ejector nozzle simultaneously.
Technical Paper

Three-Dimensional Navier-Stokes Analysis of Front End Air Flow for a Simplified Engine Compartment

1992-06-01
921091
A computer code for predicting cooling air flow through the radiator and the condenser has been developed. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, together with the porous flow model for the radiator and the condenser, were solved to simulate front end air flow and the engine compartment flow simultaneously. These transport equations were discretized based on a finite-volume method in a transformed domain. The computational results for a simplified engine compartment showed overall flow information, such as the cooling air flow through the radiator and the condenser, the effects of an air dam, and the effects of fresh air vents near the top of the radiator and the condenser. Comparison of the available experimental data with the analysis showed excellent prediction of the cooling air flow through the radiator and the condenser.
Technical Paper

Vehicle Underbody Thermal Simulation Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

1999-03-01
1999-01-0579
This study was initiated to evaluate the thermal characteristics of a vehicle underbody using math-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation based on 3-D configuration. Simulations without heat shields were carried out for different vehicle operating conditions which placed several areas at risk of exceeding their thermal design limits. Subsequently, simulations with several heat shield designs were performed. Results show that areas at risk without shields are well within thermal design limits when shielded. Part of the CFD simulation results were compared with experimental data, with reasonable correlation. The CFD approach can provide useful design information in a very short time frame.
Technical Paper

Computational Flow Analysis of Brake Cooling

1997-02-24
971039
Air flow around the front brake assembly was computed using STAR-CD version 2.300, a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code in order to explore the possibility of using this technique as a design tool. The primary objective in a brake corner assembly design is to maximize air cooling of the brake rotor. It is a very challenging task that requires experiments that are both expensive and time consuming in order to evaluate and optimize the various design possibilities. In this study, it is demonstrated that the design procedure can be shortened and made less expensive and be accurate using flow simulations. Accordingly, the air flow around the front brake assembly was computed for three different designs and for three different car speeds. A computational mesh was built using PROSTAR, the STAR-CD pre and post-processor. The three-dimensional mesh had almost 900,000 cells. All geometrical components were modelled.
Technical Paper

Impact of Engine Design on Vehicle Heating System Performance

1997-05-19
971839
A global thermal model of a vehicle powertrain is used to quantify how different engine design and powertrain calibration strategies influence the performance of a vehicle heating system. Each strategy is evaluated on its ability to improve the warm-up and heat rejection characteristics of a small-displacement, spark-ignition engine while minimizing any adverse effect on fuel consumption or emissions. An energy audit analysis shows that the two strategies having the greatest impact on heating system performance are advancing the spark and forcing the transmission to operate in a lower gear. Changes in head mass, exhaust port diameter, and coolant flow rate influence the coolant warm-up rate but have relatively little effect on steady state heat transfer at the heater core.
Technical Paper

Investigation of Fluid Flow Through a Vane Pump Flow Control Valve

1995-04-01
951113
The recent development of a new vane-type pump for power steering applications involved paying special attention to the fluid flow dynamics within the pump casing, especially in the flow control or supercharge region, where excess pump fluid flow is diverted to the intake region. Durability testing of initial designs revealed the presence of cavitation damage to the pump casing in the supercharging region. Subsequent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses as well as experimental Flow Visualization studies aided in resolving the cavitation-damage problem. The purpose of this paper is to describe the processes used in the CFD analyses and flow visualization studies. A two-dimensional (2D) convergence study was conducted to determine the CFD meshing requirements across the small orifice at the intersection of the flow-control valve and the supercharge port. An iterative procedure was employed to determine the operating position of the flow-control valve.
Technical Paper

HVAC Plenum Design Analysis

1995-02-01
950113
The air passages of a plenum are investigated with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. The objectives of the simulations are to examine the pressure drop between inlet (windshield base) and outlet (blower inlet), the water intrusion quantity into the HVAC module, and the velocity profile and flow rate at the outlet. An initial analysis relies on a two dimensional mesh around the chimney area. The velocity distribution at the outlet and the pressure drop (between inlet and outlet) are compared between a baseline design and a design with guide vanes. A more detailed analysis is conducted with a three dimensional mesh, to examine designs with different baffle/vane locations and inlet openings. Designs with baffles were found to reduce the water quantity entering the HVAC module. However, the pressure drop increased because the flow paths were choked.
Technical Paper

Dual Fan Alternator Design Analysis

1996-02-01
960272
Component operating temperatures affect both the reliability and performance of automotive alternators. It is desirable to keep the rectifier bridge and regulator temperatures below 175 C because of the semiconductors contained in this area. At temperatures greater than this, expected lifespans have been observed to decay exponentially [1]. The air flow field surrounding an alternator and component temperature fields were investigated with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. The objectives of the simulations were to examine the velocity field for the flow passage and the temperature fields for the components. Design proposals have been made to improve the air flow and to reduce the operating temperature. An initial investigation was performed by setting an alternator in a test configuration and applying the appropriate heat generation for each component. The high temperatures in the alternator components occurred in the stator and the rectifier.
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