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Technical Paper

Disc Brake Rotor Squeal Suppression Using Dither Control

2001-04-30
2001-01-1605
“Dither” control recently has been experimentally demonstrated to be an effective means to suppress and prevent rotor mode disc brake squeal. Dither control employs a control effort at a frequency higher, oftentimes significantly higher, than the disturbance to be controlled. The control actuator used for the work presented in this paper is a piezoelectric stack actuator located within the piston of a floating caliper brake. The actuator is driven in open-loop control at a frequency greater than the squeal frequency. This actuator configuration and drive signal produces a small fluctuation about the mean clamping force of the brake. The control exhibits a threshold behavior, where complete suppression of brake squeal is achieved once the control effort exceeds a threshold value. This paper examines the dependency of the threshold effort upon the frequency of the dither control signal, applied to the suppression of a 5.6 kHz rotor squeal mode.
Technical Paper

Real-Time Integrated Economic and Environmental Performance Monitoring of a Production Facility

2001-03-05
2001-01-0625
In this paper, we describe our work and experiences with integrating environmental and economic performance monitoring in a production facility of Interface Flooring Systems, Inc. The objective of the work is to create a ‘dashboard’ that integrates environmental and economic monitoring and assessment of manufacturing processes, and provides engineers and managers an easy to use tool for obtaining valid, comparable assessment results that can be used to direct attention towards necessary changes. To this purpose, we build upon existing and familiar cost management principles, in particular Activity-Based Costing and Management (ABC&ABM), and we extend those into environmental management in order to obtain a combined economic and environmental performance measurement framework (called Activity-Based Cost and Environmental Management).
Technical Paper

Low Speed Canard-Tip-Vortex Airfoil Interaction

1997-05-01
971469
This paper describes a series of ongoing experiments to capture the details of perpendicular vortex-airfoil interaction. Three test cases explored are: 1) a 21% thick symmetric airfoil at 1.1° angle of attack, 2)a thin flat plate of 2.5% thickness with rounded leading edge, sharp trailing edge and zero angle of attack and 3) A 12% thick symmetric airfoil at zero angle of attack. The tip vortex was generated by a NACA0016 wing at 5° AOA. The strength of the vortex was computed from the velocity profile measured upstream for the first two cases. Pressure measurements on the 21% airfoil were used to quantify the effect of the vortex as a function of its stand-off distance from the airfoil. Vortex trajectories over the airfoils were obtained from laser sheet videography. The vortex motion conforms to potential flow expectations except in regions of pressure gradient and during head-on interaction.
Technical Paper

Design and Fabrication of Composite Attach Fitting for Satellite Launch Vehicle

1998-06-02
981837
Compressive load capacity of composite lattice structures are studied. The objective of this research is to investigate the buckling strength of composite lattice structures and to design the most weight efficient structure with the highest buckling load. Buckling strength of both the composite lattice cylindrical and conical shells under axial compressive loads are examined. The main emphasis is placed on the effects of geometric constraints and the optimal design of the structures. In this research, various constraints are studied and the optimal structure which gives the highest strength to weight ratio is obtained. Moreover, these structures can be constructed by filament winding, the manufacturing process can be automated, and the costs can be greatly reduced.
Technical Paper

A Probabilistic Design Methodology for Commercial Aircraft Engine Cycle Selection

1998-09-28
985510
The objective of this paper is to examine ways in which to implement probabilistic design methods in the aircraft engine preliminary design process. Specifically, the focus is on analytically determining the impact of uncertainty in engine component performance on the overall performance of a notional large commercial transport, particularly the impact on design range, fuel burn, and engine weight. The emphasis is twofold: first is to find ways to reduce the impact of this uncertainty through appropriate engine cycle selections, and second is on finding ways to leverage existing design margin to squeeze more performance out of current technology. One of the fundamental results shown herein is that uncertainty in component performance has a significant impact on the overall aircraft performance (it is on the same order of magnitude as the impact of the cycle itself).
Technical Paper

New Approaches to Conceptual and Preliminary Aircraft Design: A Comparative Assessment of a Neural Network Formulation and a Response Surface Methodology

1998-09-28
985509
This paper critically evaluates the use of Neural Networks (NNs) as metamodels for design applications. The specifics of implementing a NN approach are researched and discussed, including the type and architecture appropriate for design-related tasks, the processes of collecting training and validation data, and training the network, resulting in a sound process, which is described. This approach is then contrasted to the Response Surface Methodology (RSM). As illustrative problems, two equations to be approximated and a real-world problem from a Stability and Controls scenario, where it is desirable to predict the static longitudinal stability for a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) at takeoff, are presented. This research examines Response Surface Equations (RSEs) as Taylor series approximations, and explains their high performance as a proven approach to approximate functions that are known to be quadratic or near quadratic in nature.
Technical Paper

Technology Impact Forecasting for a High Speed Civil Transport

1998-09-28
985547
This paper outlines a comprehensive, structured, and robust methodology for decision making in the early phases ofaircraft design. The proposed approach is referred to as the Technology Identification, Evaluation, and Selection (TIES) method. The seven-step process provides the decision maker/designer with an ability to easily assess and trade-off the impact of various technologies in the absence of sophisticated, time-consuming mathematical formulations. The method also provides a framework where technically feasible alternatives can be identified with accuracy and speed. This goal is achieved through the use of various probabilistic methods, such as Response Surface Methodology and Monte Carlo Simulations. Furthermore, structured and systematic techniques are utilized to identify possible concepts and evaluation criteria by which comparisons could be made.
Technical Paper

On-Line Identification of End Milling Cutter Runout

1996-05-01
961638
Cutter runout has been a target for monitoring and control of machining processes in view of the constraint it places on the achievable productivity. Off-line metrology based on various displacement probes such as dial indicators or proximity sensors provides information regarding the runout characteristics in a non-cutting state. However, during the actual process of machining off-line calibrations often become irrelevant since the cutting parameters and machining configuration significantly affect the behavior of runout. This paper presents a methodology of in-process identification of cutter runout in end milling based on the analysis of cutting forces. The presence of cutter runout generates cutting force components at one spindle frequency above and below the tooth passing frequency.
Technical Paper

New Approaches to Multidisciplinary Synthesis: An Aero-Structures-Control Application Using Statistical Techniques

1996-10-01
965501
An evolving aircraft synthesis simulation environment which offers improvements to existing methods at multiple levels of a design process is described in this paper. As design databases become obsolete due to the introduction of new technologies and classes of vehicles and as sophisticated analysis codes are often too computationally expensive for iterative applications, the design engineer may find a lack of usable information needed for decision making. Within the environment developed in this paper, rapid sensitivity analysis is possible through a unique representation of the relationship between fundamental design variables and system objectives. The combined use of the Design of Experiments and Response Surface techniques provides the ability to form this design relationship among system variables and target values, which is termed design-oriented in nature.
Technical Paper

Preliminary Assessment of the Economic Viability of a Family of Very Large Transport Configurations

1996-10-01
965516
A family of Very Large Transport (VLT) concepts were studied as an implementation of the affordability aspects of the Robust Design Simulation (RDS) methodology which is based on the Integrated Product and Process Development (IPPD) initiative that is sweeping through industry. The VLT is envisioned to be a high capacity (600 to 1000 passengers), long range (∼7500 nm), subsonic transport. Various configurations with different levels of technology were compared, based on affordability issues, to a Boeing 747-400 which is a current high capacity, long range transport. The varying technology levels prompted a need for an integration of a sizing/synthesis (FLOPS) code with an economics package (ALCCA). The integration enables a direct evaluation of the added technology on a configuration economic viability.
Technical Paper

Formulation of an IPPD Methodology for the Design of a Supersonic Business Jet

1996-10-01
965591
The growth of international markets as well as business partnerships between U.S. and Asian-based firms has lead to an increased interest in an economically viable business jet capable of supersonic cruise and trans-Pacific range with one stop over (or non-stop trans-Atlantic range)1. Such an aircraft would reduce the travel time to these regions by as much as 50% by increasing cruise Mach number from roughly 0.85 to 2.0. In response to this interest, the 1996 AIAA / United Technologies / Pratt & Whitney Individual Undergraduate Design Competition has issued a Request for Proposal for the conceptual design of a supersonic cruise business jet. The design of this aircraft considered both performance and economic issues in the conceptual design phase. Through the use of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) and Design of Experiments (DoE) techniques, the aerodynamics of this vehicle were modeled and incorporated into an aircraft sizing code, FLOPS.
Technical Paper

An Assessment of a Reaction Driven Stopped Rotor/Wing Using Circulation Control in Forward Flight

1996-10-01
965612
The desire of achieving faster cruise speed for rotorcraft vehicles has been around since the inception of the helicopter. Many unconventional concepts have been considered and researched such as the advanced tilt rotor with canards, the tilt-wing, the folding tiltrotor, the coaxial propfan/folding tiltrotor, the variable diameter tiltrotor, and the stopped rotor/wing concept, in order to fulfill this goal. The most notable program which addressed the technology challenges of accomplishing a high speed civil transport mission is the High Speed Rotorcraft Concept (HSRC) program. Among the long list of potential configurations to fulfill the HSRC intended mission, the stopped rotor/wing is the least investigated due to the fact that the existing rotorcraft synthesis codes cannot handle this type of vehicle. In order to develop such a tool, a designer must understand the physics behind this unique concept.
Technical Paper

Analysis of Tiltwing Aircraft Configuration Potential

1996-11-18
962290
This paper outlines work performed by the Aeronautical Systems Division of the Aerospace and Transportation Laboratory at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI). The paper provides limited, but pertinent information relative to the technical viability of a tiltwing configurations as civil powered-lift aircraft. Emphasis has been placed on identifying the complexity differences with tiltrotor and helicopter configurations. Complexity differences normally impact both acquisition and/or operating and support costs, although specific cost estimates are not presented.
Technical Paper

Designing Ranged Sets of Top-Level Design Specifications for a Family of Aircraft: An Application of Design Capability Indices

1997-10-01
975513
Design capability indices provide a metric to assess the capability of a family of designs, represented by a range of top-level design specifications, to satisfy a ranged set of design requirements. Design capability indices can be used to manage design freedom in the early stages of the design process when design requirements for a system may be uncertain. To illustrate the use of design capability indices, the design of a family of General Aviation aircraft is presented: design capability indices are used to simultaneously design a family of three aircraft around a two, a four, and a six seater configuration. The results are compared against two of our previous studies.
Technical Paper

A Probabilistic Approach to Multivariate Constrained Robust Design Simulation

1997-10-01
975508
Several approaches to robust design have been proposed in the past. Only few acknowledged the paradigm shift from performance based design to design for cost. The incorporation of economics in the design process, however, makes a probabilistic approach to design necessary, due to the inherent ambiguity of assumptions and requirements as well as the operating environment of future aircraft. The approach previously proposed by the authors, linking Response Surface Methodology with Monte Carlo Simulations, has revealed itself to be cumbersome and at times impractical for multi-constraint, multi-objective problems. In addition, prediction accuracy problems were observed for certain scenarios that could not easily be resolved. Hence, this paper proposes an alternate approach to probabilistic design, which is based on a Fast Probability Integration technique.
Technical Paper

Aircraft Control Using Stagnation Point Displacement

1997-10-01
975590
A Stagnation Point Actuator is used to control the lateral dynamics of vortices generated over a sharp-pointed forebody, at high angles of attack, and the resulting rolling moment is studied. Effective roll control is demonstrated, including the ability to suppress the wing rock phenomenon. Piecewise-linear transfer functions are developed from experimental data for the changes in roll moment and pressure difference with actuator frequency content. These transfer functions are reduced to compact form in the frequency domain, and then to a time-domain model using 2 gains and 2 time scales. The roll response is classified according to angle of attack range. Some long time scales are observed in the surface pressure, velocity field and rolling moment, making the response relatively insensitive to speed. Thus over substantial speed ranges, linear transfer functions are shown to effectively describe the roll response to motion of the Stagnation Point Actuator.
Technical Paper

Nonlinear Adaptive Control of Tiltrotor Aircraft Using Neural Networks

1997-10-13
975613
Neural network augmented model inversion control is used to provide a civilian tilt-rotor aircraft with consistent response characteristics throughout its operating envelope, including conversion flight. The implemented response types are Attitude Command Attitude Hold in the longitudinal channel, and Rate Command Attitude Hold about the roll and yaw axes. This article describes the augmentation in the roll channel and the augmentation for the yaw motion including Heading Hold at low airspeeds and automatic Turn Coordination at cruise flight. Conventional methods require extensive gain scheduling with tilt-rotor nacelle angle and airspeed. A control architecture is developed that can alleviate this requirement and thus has the potential to reduce development time. It also facilitates the implementation of desired handling qualities, and permits compensation for partial failures.
Technical Paper

Development of Response Surface Equations for High-Speed Civil Transport Takeoff and Landing Noise

1997-10-01
975570
As an element of a design optimization study of high speed civil transport (HSCT), response surface equations (RSEs) were developed with the goal of accurately predicting the sideline, takeoff, and approach noise levels for any combination of selected design variables. These RSEs were needed during vehicle synthesis to constrain the aircraft design to meet FAR 36, Stage 3 noise levels. Development of the RSEs was useful as an application of response surface methodology to a previously untested discipline. Noise levels were predicted using the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP), with additional corrections to account for inlet and exhaust duct lining, mixer-ejector nozzles, multiple fan stages, and wing reflection. The fan, jet, and airframe contributions were considered in the aircraft source noise prediction.
Technical Paper

Aerothermodynamic Design of Supersonic Channel Airfoils for Drag Reduction

1997-10-01
975572
A supersonic channel airfoil (SCA) concept that can be applied to the leading edges of wings, tails, fins, struts, and other appendages of aircraft, atmospheric entry vehicles and missiles in supersonic flight for drag reduction is described. It is designed to be beneficial at conditions in which the leading edge is significantly blunted and the Mach number normal to the leading edge is supersonic. The concept is found to result in significantly reduced wave drag and total drag (including skin friction drag) and significantly increased L/D. While this reduction over varying flight conditions has been quantified, some leading edge geometries result in adverse increases in peak heat transfer rates. To evaluate the effectiveness of SCAs in reducing drag without paying any penalties in other areas like lifting capacity, heating rates or enclosed volume, the design space was studied in greater detail using MDO methods.
Technical Paper

Probabilistic Analysis of an HSCT Modeled with an Equivalent Laminated Plate Wing

1997-10-01
975571
The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), a supersonic commercial transport currently under development, presents several challenges to traditional conceptual design. The current historical database used by many commercial transport design processes only include data for subsonic transports and therefore does not apply to innovative new configurations such as the HSCT. Therefore, physics-based, preliminary design tools must be used to model the characteristics of advanced aircraft in conceptual sizing routines. In addition, the evaluation of the aircraft design space often requires the analysis of many configurations in order to assess the impact of design constraints and determine the attainable range of system level metrics, a process which is very time consuming in both modeling and computer run time.
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