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Technical Paper

Inverse Method for Measuring Weld Temperatures during Resistance Spot Welding

2001-03-05
2001-01-0437
A new monitoring system predicts the progression of welding temperature fields during resistance spot welding. The system captures welding voltages and currents to predict contact diameters and simulate temperature fields. The system accurately predicts fusion lines and heat-affected zones. Accuracy holds even for electrode tips used for a few thousand welds of zinc coated steels.
Technical Paper

A Study of Cycle-to-Cycle Variations in SI Engines Using a Modified Quasi-Dimensional Model

1996-05-01
961187
This paper describes the use of a modified quasi-dimensional spark-ignition engine simulation code to predict the extent of cycle-to-cycle variations in combustion. The modifications primarily relate to the combustion model and include the following: 1. A flame kernel model was developed and implemented to avoid choosing the initial flame size and temperature arbitrarily. 2. Instead of the usual assumption of the flame being spherical, ellipsoidal flame shapes are permitted in the model when the gas velocity in the vicinity of the spark plug during kernel development is high. Changes in flame shape influence the flame front area and the interaction of the enflamed volume with the combustion chamber walls. 3. The flame center shifts due to convection by the gas flow in the cylinder. This influences the flame front area through the interaction between the enflamed volume and the combustion chamber walls. 4. Turbulence intensity is not uniform in cylinder, and varies cycle-to-cycle.
Technical Paper

Application of Vibration Damping Steel Sheet for Autobody Structural Parts

1992-02-01
920249
As a demand for vehicles of higher functionality grows, automakers and material suppliers are devoting increasing efforts to develop technologies for greater safety, lighter weight, higher corrosion resistance, and enhanced quietness. The resin-sandwiched vibration damping steel sheet (VDSS), developed as a highly functional material for reducing vehicle vibration and noise, has been used for oil pans1) and compartment partitions2). First applied for a structural dash panel of the new Mazda 929, a Zn-Ni electroplated VDSS which allows direct electric welding has contributed to greater weight reduction as well as improved quietness.
Technical Paper

Parametric Analysis of Resistance Spot Welding Lobe Curve

1988-02-01
880278
A linearized lumped parameter heat balance model was developed and is discussed for the general case of resistance welding to see the effects of each parameter on the lobe shape. The parameters include material properties, geometry of electrodes and work piece, weld time and current, and electrical and thermal contact characteristics. These are then related to heat dissipation in the electrodes and the work piece. The results indicate that the ratio of thermal conductivity and heat capacity to electrical resistivity is a characteristic number which is representative of the ease of spot weldability of a given material. The increases in thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the sheet metal increase the lobe width while increases in electrical resistivity decrease the lobe width. Inconsistencies in the weldability of thin sheets and the wider lobe width at long welding times can both be explained by the heat dissipation characteristics.
Technical Paper

Computational Study of the Aerodynamic Behavior of a Three-Dimensional Car Configuration

1989-02-01
890598
Three-dimensional flows around a car configuration, a Mazda RX-7, were computed by directly integrating the governing unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. A well-established finite-difference procedure was utilized. The basic equations were formulated in a generalized coordinate system. A third-order upwind scheme was applied to discretize the equations, and the numerical solutions were acquired without using any explicit turbulence models. Elaborate numerical results were presented at a high Reynolds number, Re=106 (based on the body length). In order to investigate the influence of the cross wind, computations were carried out for two yaw angles, i.e., 0 degree and 30 degrees. Extensive flow visualizations, using state-of-the-art computer graphics, were performed; details of the three-dimensional flow structure were examined. Well-controlled wind tunnel experiments were also conducted.
Technical Paper

The Corrosion Resistance of Organic Composite-Coated Steel Sheets

1993-10-01
932365
In order to investigate the corrosion resistance of organic composite-coated steel sheets ( OCS ) in a real automotive environment, many kinds of corrosion tests were performed on test pieces and real automotive doors. Tests with a corrosive solution including iron rust were introduced to simulate the real corrosive environment of automotive doors. The relationship between the components of OCS and the corrosion resistance in the rust-including tests was examined. In addition, electrochemical studies were performed. Results indicate OCS has much better corrosion resistance than plated steel sheets with heavier coating weight in all tests. OCS shows excellent corrosion resistance in rust-free corrosive solution, however, some types of OCS do have corrosion concerns in rust-including tests. It became clear that these OCS types have an organic coating with lower cross-linking.
Technical Paper

Development of Simultaneous Zinc Phosphating Process for Aluminum and Steel Plates

1993-11-01
931936
A method was studied for simultaneous zinc phosphating on aluminum and steel surfaces to obtain high corrosion resistance on aluminum surfaces, which conventional phosphatic processing could not provide with sufficient corrosion resistance. Since aluminum is protected by an oxide film on its surface, it has poor processability with zinc phosphating solutions applied to steel. An appropriate quantity of fluoride was therefore added to improve processing, and the coating film, aluminum composition and surface conditions were optimized to suppress filiform corrosion, which is characterized by string-like blisters of paint film starting from a paint defect. In addition, in view of the actual production environment, the corrosion resistance of the ground area made for readjustment after stamping was studied for the optimization of the processing solution.
Technical Paper

Influence of Geometry of Rear part on the Aerodynamic Drag and Wake Structure of a Vehicle

1987-11-08
871236
The substantial part of the drag of an automobile is the pressure drag. Therefore, the car must be designed as it produces minimum pressure drag. The present paper describes effects of geometrical configuration of the rear part of a car on the aerodynamic drag. Experiments were made on 1/5 scale models of fastback and notchback design. For the fastback car the drag depends heavily on the angle of a rear window. At a certain critical angle the drag shows a sharp peak. This peak drag can be reduced drastically by the tapering of plan form of the rear geometry. For the notch-back design some combination of the angle of rear window and height of trunk deck shows similar maximum in the drag. Methods of avoiding the large drag were also found. Our experiment was extended to the measurement of structure of wake by hot wire anemometers and total pressure tubes. The correlation between the wake structure and drag was clarified by the consideration of vorticity and circulation.
Technical Paper

A Study About In-Cylinder Flow and Combustion in a 4-Valve S.I. Engine

1992-02-01
920574
Lean-burn technology is now being reviewed again in view of demands for higher efficiency and cleanness in internal combustion engines. The improvement of combustion using in-cylinder gas flow control is the fundamental technology for establishing lean-burn technology, but the great increase in main combustion velocity due to intensifying of turbulence causes a deterioration in performance such as increase in heat loss and N0x. Thus, it is desirable to improve combustion stability while suppressing the increase in main burn velocity as much as possible (1). It is expected that the fluid characteristics of the in-cylinder tumbling motion that the generated vortices during intake stroke breake down in end-half of compression stroke will satisfy the above requisition. This study is concerned with the effects of enhancing of tumble intensity on combustion in 4-valve S. I. engines.
Technical Paper

Estimation Method for Automobile Aerodynamic Noise

1992-02-01
920205
Cost and weight reduction considerations make it very important to evaluate and reduce aerodynamic noise in the early stage of vehicle develpment. For these reasons, a method to evaluate aerodynamic noise quantitatively is needed. As an initial step, our first paper investigated airflow around the A-pillar of a full-scale vehicle. As a result, vortical flow structure and the influence of the vortical flow on the pressure fluctuations were clarified. As the second step, this paper presents an estimation method for the aerodynamic noise from a vehicle. Based on Lighthill's equation, we propose an evaluation equation to estimate aerodynamic noise. The aerodynamic noise radiated externally from a vehicle is estimated as ∑(Pfi,fi,Sfi)2 Where Pfi is the fluctuating pressure on the surface of the vehicle, fi the frequency and Sfi the correlation area. The method is applied to the aerodynamic noise problem associated with the A-pillar of a vehicle.
Technical Paper

Unsteady-Wake Analysis of the Aerodynamic Drag of a Notchback Model with Critical Afterbody Geometry

1992-02-01
920202
For both notchback-type and fastback-type models, it has been found that critical geometries which increase the aerodynamic drag exist, and the time-averaged wake patterns basically consist of an arch vortex behind the rear window and trailing vortices in the wake. The unsteady characteristics of the wake seem to be directly related to aerodynamic drag. However, the unsteady characteristics of these wake patterns for notchback and fastback cars were not clear. The purpose of present paper is to clarify these phenomena. We try to analyze experimentally the unsteady characteristics by measuring the velocity fluctuations in the wake, the pressure fluctuations on the trunk deck and the drag-force fluctuations acting on the model. At the same time, the analysis of the numerical simulation was made by using the same numerical model as the experimental model. The computed flow visualization behind the rear window showed a fluctuating arch vortex.
Technical Paper

Numerical Study of Aerodynamic Noise Radiated from a Three-Dimensional Wing

1992-02-01
920341
In this paper, a prediction method of the aerodynamic sound emitted from the three-dimensional delta wing of the attack angle at 15 degrees is presented. Computed flow Reynolds numbers range from 2.39x1 05 up to 9.56X 105. The method is based on the assumptions: flow Mach number is much less than unity and the strength of sound source equals Curle's dipole. These assumptions are validated by the experimental works performed in a quiet-flow-noise wind tunnel. Owing to the low Mach number condition, the computation region can be devided into two regions: inner flow region and outer wave region. The incompressible flow computation in the inner region is performed based on the full Navier-Stokes equations. The integration of the N-S equations are executed by using finite-difference method. For high Reynolds flow computation, the nonlinear convection terms are discretized by third-order upwind difference scheme.
Technical Paper

Small Scale Research in Automobile Aerodynamics

1966-02-01
660384
This paper describes a three component strain gage balance designed to measure aerodynamic forces exerted on small automobile models when subjected to turbulence in an experimental wind tunnel. The instrument is described and the details of obtaining values with it are fully explained. Although tests were conducted on these models at quarter-scale Reynolds number, results agree closely with similar tests on larger models. The balance makes practical some unusual preliminary investigations before developing full-scale prototypes.
Technical Paper

Characterization of Structural, Volume and Pressure Components to Space Suit Joint Rigidity

2009-07-12
2009-01-2535
Gas-pressurized space suits are highly resistive to astronaut movement, and this resistance has been previously explained by volume and/or structural effects. This study proposed that an additional effect, pressure effects due to compressing/expanding the internal gas during joint articulation, also inhibits mobility. EMU elbow torque components were quantified through hypobaric testing. Structural effects dominated at low joint angles, and volume effects were found to be the primary torque component at higher angles. Pressure effects were found to be significant only at high joint angles (increased flexion), contributing up to 8.8% of the total torque. These effects are predicted to increase for larger, multi-axis joints. An active regulator system was developed to mitigate pressure effects, and was found to be capable of mitigating repeated pressure spikes caused by volume changes.
Technical Paper

Effect of Operating Conditions and Fuel Type on Crevice HC Emissions: Model Results and Comparison with Experiments

1999-10-25
1999-01-3578
A one-dimensional model for crevice HC post-flame oxidation is used to calculate and understand the effect of operating parameters and fuel type (propane and isooctane) on the extent of crevice hydrocarbon and the product distribution in the post flame environment. The calculations show that the main parameters controlling oxidation are: bulk burned gas temperatures, wall temperatures, turbulent diffusivity, and fuel oxidation rates. Calculated extents of oxidation agree well with experimental values, and the sensitivities to operating conditions (wall temperatures, equivalence ratio, fuel type) are reasonably well captured. Whereas the bulk gas temperatures largely determine the extent of oxidation, the hydrocarbon product distribution is not very much affected by the burned gas temperatures, but mostly by diffusion rates. Uncertainties in both turbulent diffusion rates as well as in mechanisms are an important factor limiting the predictive capabilities of the model.
Technical Paper

Spot Friction Welding of Aluminum to Steel

2007-04-16
2007-01-1703
Spot friction welding (SFW) is a cost-effective spot joining technology for aluminum sheets compared with resistance spot welding (RSW) [1]. In this study, coated mild steel was spot friction welded to 6000 series aluminum using a tool with shoulder diameter of 10 mm and welding conditions of 1500-2000 rpm and time of 5 s. Testing showed that tensile shear strength increased as the solidus temperature of the coating on the steel decreased. Microstructure characterizations of steel/Al joint interfaces showed that zinc from the coatings was incorporated into the stir nuggets and that intermetallic phases may have formed but not in continuous layers. Some Al-Zn oxides that appeared to be amorphous were also found in the joint interfaces.
Technical Paper

An Analysis of Ambient Air Entrainment into Split Injection D.I. Gasoline Spray by LIF-PIV Technique

2002-10-21
2002-01-2662
Effects of split injection, with a relatively short time interval between the two sprays, on the spray development process, and the air entrainment into the spray, were investigated by using laser induced fluorescence and particle image velocimetry (LIF-PIV) techniques. The velocities of the spray and the ambient air were measured. The cumulative mass of the ambient air entrained into the spray was calculated by using the entrainment velocity normal to the spray boundary. The vortex structure of the spray, formed around the leading edge of the spray, showed a true rotating flow motion at low ambient pressures of 0.1 MPa, whereas at 0.4 MPa, it was not a true rotating flow, but a phenomenon of the small droplets separating from the leading edge of the spray and falling behind, due to air resistance. The development processes of the 2nd spray were considerably different from that of the 1st spray because the 2nd spray was injected into the flow fields formed by the 1st spray.
Journal Article

A Numerical Study on Detailed Soot Formation Processes in Diesel Combustion

2014-10-13
2014-01-2566
This study simulates soot formation processes in diesel combustion using a large eddy simulation (LES) model, based on a one-equation subgrid turbulent kinetic energy model. This approach was implemented in the KIVA4 code, and used to model diesel spray combustion within a constant volume chamber. The combustion model uses a direct integration approach with a fast explicit ordinary differential equation (ODE) solver, and is additionally parallelized using OpenMP. The soot mass production within each computation cell was determined using a phenomenological soot formation model developed by Waseda University. This model was combined with the LES code mentioned above, and included the following important steps: particle inception during which acenaphthylene (A2R5) grows irreversibly to form soot; surface growth with driven by reactions with C2H2; surface oxidation by OH radical and O2 attack; and particle coagulation.
Journal Article

Unsteady Vehicle Aerodynamics during a Dynamic Steering Action: 2nd Report, Numerical Analysis

2012-04-16
2012-01-0448
Unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on vehicles during a dynamic steering action were investigated by numerical simulation, with a special focus on the vehicles' yaw and lateral motions. Two sedan-type vehicles with slightly different geometries at the front pillar, side skirt, under cover, and around the front wheel were adopted for comparison. In the first report, surface pressure on the body and total pressure behind the front wheel were measured in an on-road experiment. Then the relationships between the vehicles' lateral dynamic motion and unsteady aerodynamic characteristics during cornering motions were discussed. In this second report, the vehicles' meandering motions observed in on-road measurements were modeled numerically, and sinusoidal motions of lateral, yaw, and slip angles were imposed. The responding yaw moment was phase averaged, and its phase shift against the imposed slip angle was measured to assess the aerodynamic damping.
Journal Article

Effects of Ethanol Content on Gasohol PFI Engine Wide-Open-Throttle Operation

2009-06-15
2009-01-1907
The NOx emission and knock characteristics of a PFI engine operating on ethanol/gasoline mixtures were assessed at 1500 and 2000 rpm with λ =1 under Wide-Open-Throttle condition. There was no significant charge cooling due to fuel evaporation. The decrease in NOx emission and exhaust temperature could be explained by the change in adiabatic flame temperature of the mixture. The fuel knock resistance improved significantly with the gasohol so that ignition could be timed at a value much closer or at MBT timing. Changing from 0% to 100% ethanol in the fuel, this combustion phasing improvement led to a 20% increase in NIMEP and 8 percentage points in fuel conversion efficiency at 1500 rpm. At 2000 rpm, where knocking was less severe, the improvement was about half (10% increase in NIMEP and 4 percentage points in fuel conversion efficiency).
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