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Technical Paper

Analysis of Fuel Behavior in the Spark-Ignition Engine Start-Up Process

1995-02-01
950678
An analysis method for characterizing fuel behavior during spark-ignition engine starting has been developed and applied to several sets of start-up data. The data sets were acquired from modern production vehicles during room temperature engine start-up. Two different engines, two control schemes, and two engine temperatures (cold and hot) were investigated. A cycle-by-cycle mass balance for the fuel was used to compare the amount of fuel injected with the amount burned or exhausted as unburned hydrocarbons. The difference was measured as “fuel unaccounted for”. The calculation for the amount of fuel burned used an energy release analysis of the cylinder pressure data. The results include an overview of starting behavior and a fuel accounting for each data set Overall, starting occurred quickly with combustion quality, manifold pressure, and engine speed beginning to stabilize by the seventh cycle, on average.
Technical Paper

A Species-Based Multi-Component Volatility Model for Gasoline

1994-10-01
941877
A fuel volatility model based on the major species present in the fuel has been formulated. The model accurately predicts the ASTM distillation curves and Reid Vapor Pressure for hydrocarbon fuels. The model may be used to assess the fuel effects on the extent of evaporation and the vapor composition in the mixture preparation process.
Technical Paper

A Numerical Model of Piston Secondary Motion and Piston Slap in Partially Flooded Elastohydrodynamic Skirt Lubrication

1994-03-01
940696
This paper presents a numerical model of the rotational and lateral dynamics of the piston (secondary motion) and piston slap in mixed lubrication. Piston dynamic behavior, frictional and impact forces are predicted as functions of crank angle. The model considers piston skirt surface waviness, roughness, skirt profile, thermal and mechanical deformations. The model considers partially-flooded skirt and calculates the pressure distributions and friction in the piston skirt region for both hydrodynamic and boundary lubrication. Model predictions are compared with measurements of piston position using gap sensors in a single-cylinder engine and the comparison between theory and measurement shows remarkable agreement.
Technical Paper

Fuel-Air Mixing and Diesel Combustion in a Rapid Compression Machine

1988-02-01
880206
The influence of charge motion and fuel injection characteristics on diesel combustion was studied in a rapid compression machine (RCM), a research apparatus that simulates the direct-injection diesel in-cylinder environment. An experimental data base was generated in which inlet air flow conditions (temperature, velocity, swirl level) and fuel injection pressure were independently varied. High-speed movies using both direct and shadowgraph photography were taken at selected operating conditions. Cylinder pressure data were analyzed using a one-zone heat release model to calculate ignition delay times, premixed and diffusion burning rates, and cumulative heat release profiles. The photographic analysis provided data on the liquid and vapor penetration rates, fuel-air mixing, ignition characteristics, and flame spreading rates.
Technical Paper

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of the Oxidation of Unburned Hydrocarbons

1992-10-01
922235
The chemistry of unburned hydrocarbon oxidation in SI engine exhaust was modeled as a function of temperature and concentration of unburned gas for lean and rich mixtures. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were used to model isothermal reactions of unburned fuel/air mixture in an environment of burned gases at atmospheric pressure. Simulations were performed using five pure fuels (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane and toluene) for which chemical kinetic mechanisms and steady state hydrocarbon (HC) emissions data were available. A correlation is seen between reaction rates and HC emissions for different fuels. Calculated relative amounts of intermediate oxidation products are shown to be consistent with experimental measurements.
Technical Paper

M.I.T. Stirling-Cycle Heat Transfer Apparatus

1992-08-03
929465
The paper describes the design and construction of a two cylinder apparatus to measure heat transfer under conditions of oscillating pressure and oscillating flow such as found in Stirling-cycle machines. The apparatus consists of two large single stage air compressors joined by a rigid drive shaft between the two crank shafts. The compressors are 27.94 cm (11-in) diameter by 22.86 cm (9-in) stroke. The apparatus is powered by a 25 HP variable speed DC motor. Belts and a jack shaft provide wide speed ranges. The test section, which is connected between the compressor cylinders, is a 44.45 mm (1.75-in) diameter tube and about 254 cm (100-in) long. The test section is configured for measuring wall heat flux, and gas pressure as a function of time. An LDV system is being installed for measurement of gas velocity as a function of time and position. A fast response micro thermocouple measures gas temperature as a function of time and position.
Technical Paper

A Development of Statistical Human Back Contour Model for Backrest Comfort Evaluation

1993-03-01
930114
First, this paper describes a measurement of the human back-backrest interface contours and a reduction procedure of the measured contours to reconstruct the statistical back contours of American 50 and 95-percentile male. Second, the paper illustrates the difference of the back contour between the statistical male drivers and SAE 3-D Manikin. Finally, the advantage of using the back contour model in experiment is given. The AM 50 back contour model was used as a loader to obtain the backrest pressure distribution and proved an excellent tool for backrest comfort evaluation.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of a One-Zone Burn-Rate Analysis Procedure Using Production SI Engine Pressure Data

1993-10-01
932749
A single-zone burn-rate analysis based on measured cylinder pressure data proposed by Gatowski et al. in 1984 was evaluated over the full load and speed range of a spark-ignition engine. The analysis, which determines the fuel mass burning rate based on the First Law of Thermodynamics, includes sub-models for the effects of residual fraction, heat transfer, and crevices. Each of these sub-models was assessed and calibrated. Cylinder pressure data over the full engine operating range obtained from two different engines were used to examine the robustness of the analysis. The sensitivity of predictions to the parameters wall temperature, heat transfer model coefficients and exponent, swirl ratio, motoring polytropic constant, in-cylinder mass, and to uncertainty in pressure data was evaluated.
Technical Paper

Autoignition of Adiabatically Compressed Combustible Gas Mixtures

1987-11-01
872110
Measurements of explosion limits for fuel/air/diluent mixtures compressed by an expanding laminar flame have been made in a constant volume spherical bomb. The fuels studied to date range from butane to octane at fuel/air equivalence ratios from 0.8 to 1.3. The explosion pressures and temperatures range from 10 to 100 atm and 650 to 850 K. The pressure versus time curves show the behavior typical of the two-stage ignition process observed in rapid compression machines. A branched chain kinetic model has been developed to correlate the data. The model has been used to predict both the explosion limits measured in the current bomb experiments and ignition delays measured in prior rapid compression machine experiments. Good agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved with minor adjustment in published rate constants.
Technical Paper

Influence of Geometry of Rear part on the Aerodynamic Drag and Wake Structure of a Vehicle

1987-11-08
871236
The substantial part of the drag of an automobile is the pressure drag. Therefore, the car must be designed as it produces minimum pressure drag. The present paper describes effects of geometrical configuration of the rear part of a car on the aerodynamic drag. Experiments were made on 1/5 scale models of fastback and notchback design. For the fastback car the drag depends heavily on the angle of a rear window. At a certain critical angle the drag shows a sharp peak. This peak drag can be reduced drastically by the tapering of plan form of the rear geometry. For the notch-back design some combination of the angle of rear window and height of trunk deck shows similar maximum in the drag. Methods of avoiding the large drag were also found. Our experiment was extended to the measurement of structure of wake by hot wire anemometers and total pressure tubes. The correlation between the wake structure and drag was clarified by the consideration of vorticity and circulation.
Technical Paper

Estimation Method for Automobile Aerodynamic Noise

1992-02-01
920205
Cost and weight reduction considerations make it very important to evaluate and reduce aerodynamic noise in the early stage of vehicle develpment. For these reasons, a method to evaluate aerodynamic noise quantitatively is needed. As an initial step, our first paper investigated airflow around the A-pillar of a full-scale vehicle. As a result, vortical flow structure and the influence of the vortical flow on the pressure fluctuations were clarified. As the second step, this paper presents an estimation method for the aerodynamic noise from a vehicle. Based on Lighthill's equation, we propose an evaluation equation to estimate aerodynamic noise. The aerodynamic noise radiated externally from a vehicle is estimated as ∑(Pfi,fi,Sfi)2 Where Pfi is the fluctuating pressure on the surface of the vehicle, fi the frequency and Sfi the correlation area. The method is applied to the aerodynamic noise problem associated with the A-pillar of a vehicle.
Technical Paper

Numerical Study of Aerodynamic Noise Radiated from a Three-Dimensional Wing

1992-02-01
920341
In this paper, a prediction method of the aerodynamic sound emitted from the three-dimensional delta wing of the attack angle at 15 degrees is presented. Computed flow Reynolds numbers range from 2.39x1 05 up to 9.56X 105. The method is based on the assumptions: flow Mach number is much less than unity and the strength of sound source equals Curle's dipole. These assumptions are validated by the experimental works performed in a quiet-flow-noise wind tunnel. Owing to the low Mach number condition, the computation region can be devided into two regions: inner flow region and outer wave region. The incompressible flow computation in the inner region is performed based on the full Navier-Stokes equations. The integration of the N-S equations are executed by using finite-difference method. For high Reynolds flow computation, the nonlinear convection terms are discretized by third-order upwind difference scheme.
Technical Paper

Rapid Compression Machine Measurements of Ignition Delays for Primary Reference Fuels

1990-02-01
900027
A rapid compression machine for chemical kinetic studies has been developed. The design objectives of the machine were to obtain: 1)uniform well-defined core gas; 2) laminar flow condition; 3) maximum ratio of cooling to compression time; 4) side wall vortex containment; and, 5) minimum mechanical vibration. A piston crevice volume was incorporated to achieve the side wall vortex containment. Tests with inert gases showed the post-compression pressure matched with the calculated laminar pressure indicating that the machine achieved these design objectives. Measurements of ignition delays for homogeneous PRF/O2/N2/Ar mixture in the rapid compression machine have been made with five primary reference fuels (ON 100, 90, 75, 50, and 0) at an equivalence ratio of 1, a diluent (s)/oxygen ratio of 3.77, and two initial pressures of 500 Torr and 1000 Torr. Post-compression temperatures were varied by blending Ar and N2 in different ratios.
Technical Paper

IGNITION OF FUELS BY RAPID COMPRESSION

1950-01-01
500178
THE autoignition characteristics of several fuels under various conditions of mixture strength, compression ratio, and temperature have been studied by means of a rapid-compression machine. The behaviors of a knock inhibitor, tetraethyl lead, and a knock inducer, ethyl nitrite, have also been studied. Simultaneous records of pressure, volume, and the inflammation have been obtained. These records show the diverse aspects of the autoignition phenomenon and indicate, among other things, according to the authors, that a comparison of the detonating tendencies of fuels must include not only a consideration of the length of the delay period but also an evaluation of the rate of pressure rise during autoignition. Physical interpretations of the data are presented but chemical interpretations have been avoided. The work was exploratory in nature. The authors hope that the results will stimulate activity in this important branch of combustion research.
Technical Paper

Damage Tolerance of Composite Cylinders

1983-02-01
830766
The fracture of pressurized graphite/epoxy cylinders was investigated and their damage tolerance assessed. The cylinders were 610 mm (24 in) long and 305 mm (12 in) in diameter and were fabricated from Hercules A370-5H/3501-6 prepreg cloth in 4-ply configurations: (0,45)s and (45,0)s. The cylinders were slit in the longitudinal direction and the critical flaw sizes for three pressure levels were determined. Experiments on coupons of similar construction loaded in tension were previously conducted. The critical flaw sizes for the cylinders were well predicted from the flat coupon data corrected for the effects of curvature. In addition, circumferentially-wrapped unidirectional plies of Herecules AS1/3501-6 tape of various stacking sequences were used as selective reinforcement on several (0,45)s cylinders. There reinforcing plies did change the path of damage but did not prevent catastrophic failure.
Technical Paper

Anthropometric and Blood Flow Characteristics Leading to EVA Hand Injury

2009-07-12
2009-01-2471
The aim of this study was to explore if fingernail delamination injury following EMU glove use may be caused by compression-induced blood flow occlusion in the finger. During compression tests, finger blood flow decreased more than 60%, however this occurred more rapidly for finger pad compression (4 N) than for fingertips (10 N). A pressure bulb compression test resulted in 50% and 45% decreased blood flow at 100 mmHg and 200 mmHg, respectively. These results indicate that the finger pad pressure required to articulate stiff gloves is more likely to contribute to injury than the fingertip pressure associated with tight fitting gloves.
Technical Paper

Characterization of Structural, Volume and Pressure Components to Space Suit Joint Rigidity

2009-07-12
2009-01-2535
Gas-pressurized space suits are highly resistive to astronaut movement, and this resistance has been previously explained by volume and/or structural effects. This study proposed that an additional effect, pressure effects due to compressing/expanding the internal gas during joint articulation, also inhibits mobility. EMU elbow torque components were quantified through hypobaric testing. Structural effects dominated at low joint angles, and volume effects were found to be the primary torque component at higher angles. Pressure effects were found to be significant only at high joint angles (increased flexion), contributing up to 8.8% of the total torque. These effects are predicted to increase for larger, multi-axis joints. An active regulator system was developed to mitigate pressure effects, and was found to be capable of mitigating repeated pressure spikes caused by volume changes.
Technical Paper

On the Maximum Pressure Rise Rate in Boosted HCCI Operation

2009-11-02
2009-01-2727
This paper explores the combined effects of boosting, intake air temperature, trapped residual gas fraction, and dilution on the Maximum Pressure Rise Rate (MPRR) in a boosted single cylinder gasoline HCCI engine with combustion controlled by negative valve overlap. Dilutions by both air and by cooled EGR were used. Because of the sensitivity of MPRR to boost, the MPRR constrained maximum load (as measured by the NIMEP) did not necessarily increase with boosting. At the same intake temperature and trapped residual gas fraction, dilution by recirculated burn gas was effective in reducing the MPRR, but dilution by air increased the value of MPRR. The dependence of MPRR on the operating condition was interpreted successfully by a simple thermodynamic analysis that related the MPRR value to the volumetric heat release rate.
Technical Paper

A Numerical and Experimental Study of Twin-land Oil Control Ring Friction in Internal Combustion Engines Part 2

2012-04-16
2012-01-1321
A twin-land oil control ring (TLOCR) model is used to evaluate TLOCR friction and the results are compared to the experiment measurement in a single cylinder floating liner engine under motoring condition. The model is based on a correlation between the hydrodynamic pressure and film thickness, which is generated using a deterministic model. The well-known three-regime lubrication is predicted with the model for ring with different ring tensions under various engine running conditions. A good match is found for the model and experiment results.
Technical Paper

Influence of Material Properties and Pore Design Parameters on Non-Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter Performance with Ash Accumulation

2012-09-10
2012-01-1728
Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are a common component in emission-control systems of modern clean diesel vehicles. Several DPF materials have been used in various applications. Silicone Carbide (SiC) is common for passenger vehicles because of its thermal robustness derived from its high specific gravity and heat conductivity. However, a segmented structure is required to relieve thermal stress due to SiC's higher coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Cordierite (Cd) is a popular material for heavy-duty vehicles. Cordierite which has less mass per given volume, exhibits superior light-off performance, and is also adequate for use in larger monolith structures, due to its lower CTE. SiC and cordierite are recognized as the most prevalent DPF materials since the 2000's. The DPF traps not only combustible particles (soot) but also incombustible ash. Ash accumulates in the DPF and remains in the filter until being physically removed.
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