Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 4 of 4
Technical Paper

A Simulation Study of a Computer Controlled Cooling System for a Diesel Powered Truck

1984-11-01
841711
A set of control functions have been investigated for a computer controlled diesel cooling system, using the vehicle engine cooling system code. Various engine operating conditions such as the engine load, engine speed, and ambient temperature are considered as the controlling variables in the control loops. The truck simulated in the study was an International Harvester COF-9670 cab over chassis heavy-duty vehicle equipped with a standard cab heater, a Cummins NTC-350 diesel engine with a McCord radiator and standard cooling system components and after-cooler. The vehicle also had a Kysor fan-clutch and shutter system. Comparison simulation tests between the conventional cooling system and the computer controlled cooling system using the Vehicle-Engine-Cooling Computer System model under different ambient and route conditions show that the computer controlled cooling system would offer the following benefits: 1.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Ambient Temperature and Vehicle Load on a Diesel Powered Truck Cooling System Performance Using a Computer Simulation Program

1984-11-01
841710
A computer simulation model to predict the thermal responses of an on-highway heavy duty diesel truck in transient operation was used to study several important cooling system design and operating variables. The truck used in this study was an International Harvester COF-9670 cab-over-chassis vehicle equipped with a McCord radiator, Cummins NTC-350 diesel engine, Kysor fan-clutch and shutter system, aftercooler, and standard cab heater and cooling system components. Input data from several portions of a Columbus to Bloomington, Indiana route were used from the Vehicle Mission Simulation (VMS) program to determine engine and vehicle operating conditions for the computer simulation model. The thermostat-fan, thermostat-shutter-fan, and thermostat-winterfront-fan systems were studied.
Technical Paper

Development of Steel Clad Aluminum Brake

2013-09-30
2013-01-2054
Aluminum based brake rotors have been a priority research topic in the DOE 1999 Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automobile Market. After fourteen years, no satisfactory technology has been developed to solve the problem of aluminum's low working temperatures except the steel clad aluminum (SCA) brake technology. This technology research started at Michigan Technological University (MTU) in 2001 and has matured recently for commercial productions. The SCA brake rotor has a solid body and replaces the traditional convective cooling of a vented rotor with conductive cooling to a connected aluminum wheel. Much lower temperatures result with the aluminum wheel acting as a great heat sink/radiator. The steel cladding further increases the capability of the SCA rotor to withstand higher surface temperatures. During the road tests of SCA rotors on three cars, significant gas mileage improvement was found; primarily attributed to the unique capability of the SCA rotor on pad drag reduction.
Technical Paper

The Vehicle Engine Cooling System Simulation Part 2 – Model Validation Using Transient Data

1999-03-01
1999-01-0241
The Vehicle Engine Cooling System Simulation (VECSS) computer code has been developed at the Michigan Technological University to simulate the thermal response of a cooling system for an on-highway heavy duty diesel powered truck under steady and transient operation. In Part 1 of this research, the code development and verification has been presented. The revised and enhanced VECSS (version 8.1) software is capable of simulating in real-time a Freightliner FLD 120 truck with a Detroit Diesel Series 60 engine, Behr McCord radiator, Allied signal / Garrett Automotive charge air cooler and turbocharger, Kysor DST variable speed fan clutch, DDC oil and coolant thermostat. Other cooling system components were run and compared with experimental data provided by Kysor Cooling Systems. The experimental data were collected using the Detroit Diesel Electronic Control's (DDEC) Electronic Control Module (ECM) and the Hewlett Packard (HP) data acquisition system.
X