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Technical Paper

Research Advances in Dry and Semi-Dry Machining

1997-02-24
970415
The current trend in the automotive industry is to minimize/eliminate cutting fluid use in most machining operations. Research is required prior to achieving dry or semi-dry machining. Issues such as heat generation and transfer, thermal deformation and fluid lubricity related effects on tool life and surface roughness determine the feasibility of dry machining. This paper discusses recent advances in achieving dry/semi-dry machining. As the first step, research has been conducted to investigate the actual role of fluids (if any) in various machining operations. A predictive heat generation model for orthogonal cutting of visco-plastic material was created. A control volume approach allowed development of a thermal model for convective heat transfer during machining. The heat transfer performance of an air jet in dry machining was explored. The influence of machining process variables and cutting fluid presence on chip morphology was investigated through designed experiments.
Technical Paper

Recovery of Waste Polystyrene Generated by Lost Foam Technology in the Automotive Industry

2001-03-05
2001-01-0345
In the automotive industry, lost foam casting is a relatively new technology, which is gaining popularity among manufacturers. Lost foam casting is a process in which an expanded polystyrene pattern is formed into the shape of the part to be cast. More complex parts are fabricated by simply gluing several simple patterns together. The pattern is then coated with a refractory material consisting of a mineral mixture and binders. Finally, hot metal is poured into the pattern, evaporating the expanded polystyrene and taking shape of the coating shell. However, the automotive industry has observed that a significant number of these fabricated, coated patterns are damaged, or do not meet specifications prior to casting. These are not reusable and inevitably are landfilled. It is the goal of this project to develop a simple, reliable, and inexpensive technology to recover expanded polystyrene from the glue and coating constituents.
Technical Paper

Wet Versus Dry Turning: A Comparison of Machining Costs, Product Quality, and Aerosol Formation

2001-03-05
2001-01-0343
The use of cutting fluid in machining operations not only poses a health risk to workers but also creates environmental challenges associated with fluid treatment and disposal. In an effort to minimize these concerns and eliminate the costs associated with cutting fluids, e.g., purchase, maintenance, and treatment, dry machining is increasingly being considered as an alternative. This paper is focused on comparing dry and wet machining approaches from several perspectives, including air quality, product quality, and economics. Both experimental and analytical work is presented. Experiments have been performed to determine the effect cutting fluid has on product quality and aerosol generation in the wet and dry turning of gray cast iron. To compare costs in wet and dry turning, a cost model, which includes cutting fluid-related components, has also been established.
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