Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 9 of 9
Technical Paper

Fuel Film Dynamics in the Intake Port of a Fuel Injected Engine

1994-03-01
940446
Up to 80 percent of the total hydrocarbons emitted during the EPA Federal emissions test are produced in the first five minutes of this procedure. It has been theorized that this is in part due to wall wetting of the intake port and cylinder. This study measures the behavior of the fuel film thickness in the intake port during cold starting, steady state and transient operation. Three injector spray patterns with varying droplet sizes were utilized for the tests. The fuel film thickness in the intake port of a Ford 1.9L engine was measured using optical sensors. It was found that the spray pattern and droplet size affected the port wall wetting characteristics.
Technical Paper

Effects of a Ceramic Particle Trap and Copper Fuel Additive on Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions

1994-10-01
942068
This research quantifies the effects of a copper fuel additive on the regulated [oxides of nitrogen (NOx), hydrocarbons (HC) and total particulate matter (TPM)] and unregulated emissions [soluble organic fraction (SOF), vapor phase organics (XOC), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitro-PAH, particle size distributions and mutagenic activity] from a 1988 Cummins LTA10 diesel engine using a low sulfur fuel. The engine was operated at two steady state modes (EPA modes 9 and 11, which are 75 and 25% load at rated speed, respectively) and five additive levels (0, 15, 30, 60 and 100 ppm Cu by mass) with and without a ceramic trap. Measurements of PAH and mutagenic activity were limited to the 0, 30 and 60 ppm Cu levels. Data were also collected to assess the effect of the additive on regeneration temperature and duration. Copper species collected within the trap were identified and exhaust copper concentrations quantified.
Technical Paper

The Characterization of the Hydrocarbon and Sulfate Fractions of Diesel Particulate Matter

1978-02-01
780111
One of the more objectionable aspects of the use of diesel engines has been the emission of particulate matter. A literature review of combustion flames, theoretical calculations and dilution tunnel experiments have been performed to elucidate the chemical and physical processes involved in the formation of diesel particulate matter. A comparative dilution tunnel study of diluted and undiluted total particulate data provided evidence supporting calculations that indicate hydro-carbon condensation should occur in the tunnel at low exhaust temperatures. The sample collection system for the measurement of total particulate matter and soluble sulfate in particulate matter on the EPA 13 mode cycle is presented. A method to correct for hydrocarbon interferences in the EPA barium chloranilate method for the determination of sulfate in particulate matter is discussed.
Technical Paper

The Characterization of the Soluble Organic Fraction of Diesel Particulate Matter

1979-02-01
790418
This paper is concerned with the demonstration of a methodology for chemically characterizing diesel particulate organic matter (POM) emissions. The procedure begins with a Soxhlet extraction of the POM with dichloromethane to obtain a soluble organic fraction (SOF). The acidic and basic portions of the SOF are isolated by liquid-liquid extraction techniques with aqueous base and aqueous acid, respectively. The neutral portion of the extract is separated into paraffin, aromatic, transitional and oxygenated fractions by column chromatography on silica gel. Two additional fractions, the ether insoluble and hexane insoluble fractions, are also separated by the procedure. Quantitative mass data are presented on the extraction and fractionation of twelve particulate samples from the exhaust of a medium-duty diesel engine collected in a dilution tunnel at a volume dilution ratio of 8 to 1.
Technical Paper

Analysis of the Physical Characteristics of Diesel Particulate Matter Using Transmission Electron Microscope Techniques

1979-02-01
790815
An Andersen Impactor was used to collect particulate samples in both the undiluted and diluted exhaust from a Caterpillar 3150 diesel engine operated on the EPA 13-mode cycle. A total of 24 samples were examined using the transmission electron microscope and approximately 300 photomicrographs were taken. The microscope analysis and photomicrographs revealed details concerning the physical characteristics of the particulate and permitted a direct visual comparison of the samples collected. The photomicrographs were used to obtain diameter measurements of the basic individual spherical particles that comprise the much larger aggregates/agglomerates. Nearly 11,000 basic particles were measured and the observed range of diameters was 70-1200 Å. The mean particle diameters in the undiluted and diluted exhaust samples were 479 Å and 436 Å respectively. respectively. A respectively. 436 A respectively.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Low Sulfur Fuel and a Ceramic Particle Filter on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions

1992-02-01
920566
Diesel exhaust particle size distributions were measured using an Electrical Aerosol Analyzer (EAA) with both conventional (0.31 wt. pet sulfur) and low sulfur fuel (0.01 wt pet sulfur) with and without a ceramic diesel particle filter (DPF). The engine used for this study was a 1988 heavy-duty diesel engine (Cummins LTA10-300) operated at EPA steady-state modes 9 and 11. The particle size distribution results indicated the typical bi-modal distribution; however, there were clear differences in the number of particles in each mode for all conditions. For the baseline conditions with no DPF, there was more than one order of magnitude greater number of particles in the nuclei mode for the conventional fuel as compared to the low sulfur fuel, while the accumulation modes for each fuel were nearly identical.
Technical Paper

The Effect of an Oxidation Catalyst on the Physical, Chemical, and Biological Character of Diesel Particulate Emissions

1981-02-01
810263
A diesel oxidation catalyst (Engelhard PTX Series) was evaluated on a medium-duty diesel engine (Caterpillar 3208, naturally aspirated, direct injection). Tests were conducted at six modes of the EPA 13 mode heavy-duty cycle to measure the total particulate, soluble organic fraction (SOF), sulfates, NO, NO2, NOx and hydrocarbons emitted by the engine with and without the oxidation catalysts. Chemical analysis of the SOF collected was carried out to determine the effects of the catalysts on each of the subfractions composing the SOF. The Ames Salmonella/microsome bioassay was employed to quantify the mutagenic properties of the particulate SOF. Test results show large increases in the amounts of total particulate and sulfate emissions due to the catalyst while the amounts of SOF are reduced by the catalyst. The amounts of NOx produced with and without the catalyst are similar, but the equivalent NO2 emitted with the catalyst installed is increased at most modes.
Technical Paper

Physical Size Distribution Characterization of Diesel Particulate Matter and the Study of the Coagulation Process

1978-02-01
780788
Diesel particulate matter in both the diluted and undiluted state is subject to the processes of coagulation, condensation or evaporation, and nucleation which causes continuous changes in its physical characteristics. The Electrical Aerosol Analyzer (EAA) is used to measure the diesel particle size distribution in the MTU dilution tunnel for a naturally aspirated direct-injection diesel engine operated on the EPA 13 mode cycle. The design and development of accurate and repeatable sampling methods using the EAA are presented. These methods involve both steady-state tunnel and bag measurements. The data indicate a bimodal nature within the 0.001 to 1 μm range. The first mode termed the “embroynic mode” has a saddle point between 0.005 to 0.015 μm and the second mode termed the “aggregation mode” lies between .08 to .15 μm for the number distribution.
Technical Paper

Design and Analysis of an Adaptive Real-Time Advisory System for Improving Real World Fuel Economy in a Hybrid Electric Vehicle

2010-04-12
2010-01-0835
Environmental awareness and fuel economy legislation has resulted in greater emphasis on developing more fuel efficient vehicles. As such, achieving fuel economy improvements has become a top priority in the automotive field. Companies are constantly investigating and developing new advanced technologies, such as hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, improved turbo-charged gasoline direct injection engines, new efficient powershift transmissions, and lighter weight vehicles. In addition, significant research and development is being performed on energy management control systems that can improve fuel economy of vehicles. Another area of research for improving fuel economy and environmental awareness is based on improving the customer's driving behavior and style without significantly impacting the driver's expectations and requirements.
X