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Technical Paper

Optimized Gasoline Direct Injection Engine for the European Market

1998-02-23
980150
GDI (Gasoline Direct Injection) engine adopting new combustion control technologies was developed and introduced into Japanese domestic market in August of 1996. In order to extend its application to the European market, various system modifications have been performed. Injectors are located with a smaller angle to the vertical line in order to improve the combustion stability in the higher speed range. A new combustion control method named “two-stage mixing” is adopted to suppress the knock in the low speed range. As a result of this new method, the compression ratio was increased up to 12.5 to 1 while increasing the low-end torque significantly. Taking the high sulfur gasoline in the European market into account, a selective reduction lean-NOx catalyst with improved NOx conversion efficiency was employed. A warm-up catalyst can not be used because the selective reduction lean NOx catalyst requires HC for the NOx reduction.
Technical Paper

Influence of Valve Noise on Knock Detection in Spark Ignition Engines

1988-02-01
880084
Valve noise is one of the factors that deteriorate the signal-to-noise ratio in the detection of combustion knock in spark ignition engines by means of a knock control system with a conventional knock sensor and a higher frequency band-pass filter. It was determined that one of the principal mechanisms of valve noise increase is the eccentricity between the valve seat face and the insert seat face at valve contact in addition to excess valve contact speed. One of the reasons for this eccentricity is the offset between the centers of the valve guide and insert caused by cylinder head distortion due to fastening of the cylinder head and thermal distortion of the insert. Other reasons include excess clearance caused by the abrasion of the valve guide and stem, and valve tilt increase caused by inherent valve spring bend.
Technical Paper

The 1.5-Liter Vertical Vortex Engine

1992-02-01
920670
A stratified-charge lean-burn engine is newly developed for the purpose of energy saving and carbon dioxide reduction to minimize the global warming. The engine, named MVV(Mitsubishi Vertical Vortex)engine, is based on the unique vertical vortex technology which realizes stable combustion even with lean mixture without any additional device. And it also has another feature of “all range air-to-fuel ratio feedback control system” utilizing linear air-to-fuel ratio sensor. This paper describes various technologies developed in this engine.
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