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Technical Paper

Hot-Gas Spin Testing of Ceramic Turbine Rotor at TIT 1300° C

1989-02-01
890427
The high-temperature durability of 85 mm tip diameter silicon nitride ceramic radial turbine rotors was evaluated with a hot gas spin test rig. The rotors withstood up to a turbine tip speed of 700 m/s at TIT of 1300°C under partially loaded conditions and 570 m/s at TIT of 1300°C under fully loaded conditions, respectively. The material of the rotors was a post-HIPed silicon nitride. The basic fatigue properties of the material were measured at high temperatures. In the hot gas spin test, the temperature and stress distributions at the turbine blade were calculated with a finite element method. The results of the hot-gas spin test are discussed by means of a failure prediction analysis on the basis of the Weibull statistics.
Technical Paper

A New Hydraulic Coupling Unit (HCU) for 4WD Vehicles

1989-02-01
890527
This year (1989) Mitsubishi Motors Corp. introduced, on some models, a newly-developed Hydraulic Coupling Uint (HCU), by which 2WD vehicles can be converted into 4WD ones in the same way as done by a viscous coupling (VC). This HCU is similar in the configuration to a vane pump: the oil discharge is returned to the suction chamber through a number of orifices. The rotor and cam ring (housing) are respectively connected to the two shafts; either of the one with the front wheels and the other with the rear wheels. Accordingly, it works as a slip-sensitive differential like a VC while it has a merit of progressive and parabolic torque-response characteristic, which offers stronger traction and acceleration capability and also minimizes tight-corner braking. This paper discusses primarily the configurations, functions and test results of the HCU and also presents an overview on further development possibilities of the 4WD system.
Technical Paper

Heat Flow on Disc Brakes

1993-04-01
931084
This paper describes an experimental analysis of frictional heat generated between the pads and rotors of disc brakes, to determine the paths and amounts of heat flow. The brakes were applied repeatedly at a constant initial speed, deceleration and interval until brake temperature became saturated. Under these conditions we measured an unsteady temperature distribution state during a single application of the brakes, and also a saturated (quasi-stationary) temperature distribution during repeated braking. Heat flow was studied in six paths: heat conduction to the pad; heat convection to the air from the friction areas of the inner and outer disc, from the ventilating parts and from the tube section of the rotor; and heat conduction to the rotor flange section.
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