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Technical Paper

Optimization of In-Cylinder Flow and Mixing for a Center-Spark Four-Valve Engine Employing the Concept of Barrel-Stratification

1994-03-01
940986
Flow and flame structure visualization and modeling were performed to clarify the characteristics of bulk flow, turbulence and mixing in a four-valve engine to adopt the lean combustion concept named “Barrel-Stratification” to the larger displacement center-spark four-valve engine. It was found that the partitions provided in the intake port and the tumble-control piston with a curved-top configuration were effective to enhance the lean combustion of such an engine. By these methods, the fuel distribution in the intake port and the in-cylinder bulk flow structure are optimized, so that the relatively rich mixture zone is arranged around the spark plug. The tumble-control piston also contributes to optimize the flow field structure after the distortion of tumble and to enable stable lean combustion.
Technical Paper

Mixing Control Strategy for Engine Performance Improvement in a Gasoline Direct Injection Engine

1998-02-23
980158
Spray motion visualization, mixture strength measurement, flame spectral analyses and flame behavior observation were performed in order to elucidate the mixture preparation and the combustion processes in Mitsubishi GDI engine. The effects of in-cylinder flow called reverse tumble on the charge stratification were clarified. It preserves the mixture inside the spherical piston cavity, and extends the optimum injection timing range. Mixture strength at the spark plug and at the spark timing can be controlled by changing the injection timing. It was concluded that reverse tumble plays a significant role for extending the freedom of mixing. The characteristics of the stratified charge combustion were clarified through the flame radiation analyses. A first flame front with UV luminescence propagates rapidly and covers all over the combustion chamber at the early stage of combustion.
Technical Paper

Mitsubishi New 12.0-Liter Turbocharged and Intercooled Diesel Engine

1990-09-01
901572
To meet the increasingly strong demand for high-speed transportation, better fuel economy, higher reliability and the social requirements for more strict Japanese regulations against exhaust and noise emissions, Mitsubishi Motors Corporation has recently developed the 6D40T1 in-line 6-cylinder, 12.0-liter turbocharged and intercooled diesel engine for heavy-duty trucks. This engine meets the 1989 Japanese exhaust emission regulations and has an output of 258 kW. To achieve both fuel economy and good drivability, Mitsubishi's original, electronically-controlled fuel injection system was adopted. The so-called prestroke-controlled fuel injection pump is capable of flexible and precise control of both fuel injection rate and timing. The basic structure of the 6D40T1 was designed with high rigidity to permit high cylinder pressures. In addition, to reduce friction and heat losses, a 4-valve design, roller cam followers with needle roller bearings, and shortened exhaust ports were adopted.
Technical Paper

A Study of Friction Reduction by ‘Soft Skirt’ Piston

2011-08-30
2011-01-2120
To reduce friction is required to improve engine fuel economy. This study aimed to reduce piston skirt friction, which is a major factor in engine friction. ‘Soft skirt’ is a trendy item in recent gasoline engines, which can improve skirt sliding condition by larger deformation when the piston is pressed to the liner. The effect is confirmed by friction measurement and oil film observation, using prototype pistons. And also one major factor of the effect is clarified that not only side force but also cylinder pressure causes effective deformation of the skirt to create thick oil film at early combustion stroke.
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