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Technical Paper

Idling Stop System Coupled with Quick Start Features of Gasoline Direct Injection

2001-03-05
2001-01-0545
The gasoline direct injection engine starts significantly faster than a conventional engine. Fuel can be injected into the cylinder during the compression stroke at the same time of cranking start. When the spark plug ignites the mixture at the end of compression stroke, the engine has its first combustion, that is, the first combustion occurs within 0.2 sec after the start of cranking. This unique characteristic of quick startability has realized a idle stop system, which enables drivers to operate the vehicle in a natural manner.
Technical Paper

Mixing Control and Combustion in Gasoline Direct Injection Engines for Reducing Cold-Start Emissions

2001-03-05
2001-01-0550
A two-stage combustion is one of the Mitsubishi GDI™ technologies for a quick catalyst warm-up on a cold-start. However, when the combustion is continued for a long time, an increase in the fuel consumption is a considerable problem. To solve the problem, a stratified slight-lean combustion is newly introduced for utilization of catalysis. The stratified mixture with slightly lean overall air-fuel ratio is prepared by the late stage injection during the compression stroke. By optimizing an interval between the injection and the spark timing, the combustion simultaneously supplies substantial CO and surplus O2 to a catalyst while avoiding the soot generation and the fouling of a spark plug. The CO oxidation on the catalyst is utilized to reduce the cold-start emissions. Immediately after the cold-start, the catalyst is preheated for the minimum time to start the CO oxidation by using the two-stage combustion. Following that, the stratified slight-lean combustion is performed.
Technical Paper

Innovative injection rate control with next-generation, common-rail fuel injection system

2000-06-12
2000-05-0061
Injection rate control is an important capability of the ideal injection system of the future. However, in a conventional Common-Rail System (CRS) the injection pressure is constant throughout the injection period, resulting in a nearly rectangular injection rate shape and offering no control of the injection rate. Thus, in order to realize injection rate control with a CRS, a "Next- generation Common-Rail System (NCRS)" was conceptualized, designed, and fabricated. The NCRS has two common rails, for low- and high-pressure fuel, and switches the fuel pressure supplied to the injector from the low- to the high- pressure rail during the injection period, resulting in control over the injection rate shape. The effects of injection rate shape on exhaust emissions and fuel consumption were investigated by applying this NCRS to a single- cylinder research engine.
Technical Paper

Relationship Between MTBE-Blended Gasoline Properties and Warm-Up Driveability

1995-10-01
952519
The relationship between MTBE-blended gasoline properties and warm-up driveability is investigated by focusing on the transient combustion air-fuel ratio that strongly relates to the combustion state of the engine. As a result, although warm-up driveability of MTBE-free gasoline has a high correlation with 50% distillation temperature (T50) and a high correlation with 100°C distillation volume (E100), the correlation is found to be low when blended with MTBE. Various formulas that improve correlation with peak excess air ratio (λ) by correcting T50 and E100 for the amount of MTBE blended are examined. The formula for which the highest determination coefficient is obtained is proposed as a new driveability index (DI) that can also be applied to MTBE-blended gasoline. In addition, the effect on driveability by gasoline base materials using this new DI also is investigated.
Technical Paper

Optimization of In-Cylinder Flow and Mixing for a Center-Spark Four-Valve Engine Employing the Concept of Barrel-Stratification

1994-03-01
940986
Flow and flame structure visualization and modeling were performed to clarify the characteristics of bulk flow, turbulence and mixing in a four-valve engine to adopt the lean combustion concept named “Barrel-Stratification” to the larger displacement center-spark four-valve engine. It was found that the partitions provided in the intake port and the tumble-control piston with a curved-top configuration were effective to enhance the lean combustion of such an engine. By these methods, the fuel distribution in the intake port and the in-cylinder bulk flow structure are optimized, so that the relatively rich mixture zone is arranged around the spark plug. The tumble-control piston also contributes to optimize the flow field structure after the distortion of tumble and to enable stable lean combustion.
Technical Paper

Combustion Control Technologies for Direct Injection SI Engine

1996-02-01
960600
Novel combustion control technologies for the direct injection SI engine have been developed. By adopting up-right straight intake ports to generate air tumble, an electro-magnetic swirl injector to realize optimized spray dispersion and atomization and a compact piston cavity to maintain charge stratification, it has become possible to achieve super-lean stratified combustion for higher thermal efficiency under partial loads as well as homogeneous combustion to realize higher performance at full loads. At partial loads, fuel is injected into the piston cavity during the later stage of the compression stroke. Any fuel spray impinging on the cavity wall is directed to the spark plug. Tumbling air flow in the cavity also assists the conservation of the rich mixture zone around the spark plug. Stable combustion can be realized under a air fuel ratio exceeding 40. At higher loads, fuel is injected during the early stage of the intake stroke.
Technical Paper

Mixing Control Strategy for Engine Performance Improvement in a Gasoline Direct Injection Engine

1998-02-23
980158
Spray motion visualization, mixture strength measurement, flame spectral analyses and flame behavior observation were performed in order to elucidate the mixture preparation and the combustion processes in Mitsubishi GDI engine. The effects of in-cylinder flow called reverse tumble on the charge stratification were clarified. It preserves the mixture inside the spherical piston cavity, and extends the optimum injection timing range. Mixture strength at the spark plug and at the spark timing can be controlled by changing the injection timing. It was concluded that reverse tumble plays a significant role for extending the freedom of mixing. The characteristics of the stratified charge combustion were clarified through the flame radiation analyses. A first flame front with UV luminescence propagates rapidly and covers all over the combustion chamber at the early stage of combustion.
Technical Paper

Optimized Gasoline Direct Injection Engine for the European Market

1998-02-23
980150
GDI (Gasoline Direct Injection) engine adopting new combustion control technologies was developed and introduced into Japanese domestic market in August of 1996. In order to extend its application to the European market, various system modifications have been performed. Injectors are located with a smaller angle to the vertical line in order to improve the combustion stability in the higher speed range. A new combustion control method named “two-stage mixing” is adopted to suppress the knock in the low speed range. As a result of this new method, the compression ratio was increased up to 12.5 to 1 while increasing the low-end torque significantly. Taking the high sulfur gasoline in the European market into account, a selective reduction lean-NOx catalyst with improved NOx conversion efficiency was employed. A warm-up catalyst can not be used because the selective reduction lean NOx catalyst requires HC for the NOx reduction.
Technical Paper

New Mitsubishi L4 5-Liter DI Diesel Engine

1998-11-16
982800
The 4M5 series of four-cylinder, in-line, direct-injection diesel engines has been released by Mitsubishi Motors Corporation for light and medium-duty trucks and buses. Featuring an updated structure and reflecting the employment of state-of-the-art technology in the design of every component, the new engine series offers high reliability and compact dimensions. Moreover, the new series well meets contemporary demands for high performance, low noise, and clean combustion.
Technical Paper

Technology for Low Emission, Combustion Noise and Fuel Consumption on Diesel Engine

1994-03-01
940672
In order to reduce exhaust emission and combustion noise and to improve fuel consumption, the effects of the combustion system parameters of a diesel engine, such as injection pressure, injection nozzle hole diameter, swirl ratio, and EGR rate on exhaust emissions, combustion noise and fuel consumption are investigated and described in detail by analyzing rate of heat release, needle valve lift and injection pressure. Based on these results, reduction of exhaust emission and combustion noise and improvement of fuel consumption are described in the latter part of this paper. These results are shown as follows. The smaller nozzle hole diameter is effective for reducing smoke and PM, and by optimizing the injection timing and swirl ratio, NOx can also be reduced. In addition to the above, by applying EGR and higher injection pressure it is possible to improve the fuel consumption with the remaining low NOx and PM.
Technical Paper

Selective Heat Insulation of Combustion Chamber Walls for a DI Diesel Engine with Monolithic Ceramics

1989-02-01
890141
The engine performance and emissions characteristics of a single-cylinder DI diesel engine were experimentally investigated. The combustion chamber walls of the engine were thermally insulated with ceramic materials of SSN (Sintered Silicon Nitride) and PSZ (Partially Stabilized Zirconia). Fuel economy and emissions characteristics were improved by insulating selected locations of the combustion chamber walls. The selective insulation helped to create activated diffusion combustion and resulted in more efficient use of the intake air.
Technical Paper

Fuel Injection Control Systems that Improve Three Way Catalyst Conversion Efficiency

1991-02-01
910390
A fuel control method to reduce the harmful exhaust gas from SI engines is proposed. As is well known, both the amplitude and the frequency of the limit cycle in a conventional air-fuel ratio control system are determined uniquely by parameters in the system. And this limits our making full use of the oxygen storage effect of TWC. A simple model of TWC reaction revealed the relationship between maximum conversion efficiency and both the amplitude and the frequency in a air fuel control system. It also revealed that TWC conversion efficiency attained to maximum levels when both the amplitude and the frequency of the limit cycle are selected so as to make full use of the oxygen storage effect of TWC. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to vary both the amplitude and the frequency arbitrarily.
Technical Paper

Contribution of Fuel Transport Lag and Statistical Perturbation in Combustion to Oscillation of SI Engine Speed at Idle

1987-02-01
870545
Periodic oscillations of the speed of SI engine with MPI system at idle observed in the steady state and in the converging process after the inditial increase of load were investigated. These non-steady phenomena are the self-excitations of the closed-loop system induced by the lag factors inherent to the system such as the manifold charging delay and the fuel metering and transport lag and by the nonlinear factors such as the sensitivity of the torque to the equivalence ratio. But, even in the cases where the lags and the nonlinearity are insufficient, continuous oscillations with large amplitude are observed in the actual engine. They can be explained by introducing the concept of external perturbation induced by the combustion fluctuation. Disturbance prevents the phase lag in the system from converging, resulting in the continuation of oscillation.
Technical Paper

The 1.5-Liter Vertical Vortex Engine

1992-02-01
920670
A stratified-charge lean-burn engine is newly developed for the purpose of energy saving and carbon dioxide reduction to minimize the global warming. The engine, named MVV(Mitsubishi Vertical Vortex)engine, is based on the unique vertical vortex technology which realizes stable combustion even with lean mixture without any additional device. And it also has another feature of “all range air-to-fuel ratio feedback control system” utilizing linear air-to-fuel ratio sensor. This paper describes various technologies developed in this engine.
Technical Paper

Concept of Lean Combustion by Barrel-Stratification

1992-02-01
920678
A novel leanburn concept, ‘Barrel-Stratification’ is proposed. Fuel is introduced into the cylinder through one of the intake ports of a dual-intake-valve engine of which the tumbling air motion is intensified by the sophisticated intake port design. Because the velocity component in the direction parallel to the axis of tumble is small, charge stratification realized during the intake stroke is maintained until the end of the compression stroke. By the effects of charge stratification and the turbulence enhancement by tumble, stable combustion is realized even at extremely lean conditions. The concept was verified by flow field analysis applying a multi-color laser sheet technique and the flame structure analysis employing the blue-end image intensification realized by the interference mirror and the short delay phosphor.
Technical Paper

Development of the Heavy-Duty Methanol Engine

1989-11-01
891188
Methanol has a poor self-ignition property and thus requires some kind of ignition assist system. Our evaluation of two such systems, a spark-assisted type and a glow-assisted type, indicated that these systems had room for improvement in terms of combustion stability and thermal efficiency in the low-load range. Combustion improvements in the low-load range were therefore carried out by increasing the compression ratio, adopting an injection nozzle with multiple holes and providing an ignition chamber. This has resulted in the successful development of a glow-assisted methanol engine with full-load performance equivalent or superior to a base diesel engine and with lower NOx emission. For practical application of this engine, further improvements in durability and reliability are to be made.
Technical Paper

Combustion Modes of Light Duty Diesel Particulates in Ceramic Filters with Fuel Additives

1986-03-01
860292
Auto-regeneration of diesel particulate traps, particularly combustion mode of soot in a wall flow filter with fuel additives, was investigated using a diesel engine of a light duty truck and truck itself. Soot burning in the trap and regeneration were observed under any engine operating condition including prolonged idling and stop-and-go driving at 0.18g metal/1 dosage of a mixture of copper and lead in the fuels. However, trap life was limited by ash clogging due to the metallic compounds. Although the influence of metallic additives on the environment was debatable, test results of the trap durability and calculations of soot burning based on the thermal ignition theory indicated that dosage and kind of fuel additives should be optimized in view of both trap life and reliability of soot burning.
Technical Paper

Ceramic Rocker Arm Insert for Internal Combustion Engines

1986-03-01
860397
The adoption of the diesel engine EGR systems, and increased uses of alcohol in spark ignited engines require wear resistant and low maintenance valve trains. Silicon nitride ceramic inserts were pressureless-sintered and successfully die-cast in rocker arms contacting the overhead cams in the valve trains. As fired, the insert sliding surface was fine and precise, eliminating any further processing. The comosite structure was machined with the sliding surface as a reference plane. Beside inherent high wear resistance, these lighter inserts reduced inertial forces of the trains and the torque required to drive the cams. The hard, brittle ceramics and a softer, more elastic aluminum alloy made the structure more durable and reliable. The process of development includes characterization, screening, manufacturing and quality control of the materials, and determination of wear resistance and reliability for this new structure.
Technical Paper

Mitsubishi's Compound Intake System Engine

1985-02-01
850035
Mitsubishi Motors Corporation presents the newly-developed 2-liter engine, which we have named SIRIUS DASH. The SIRIUS DASH engine, with its compound intake system, features great performance in both high and low speed ranges while keeping fuel consumption low. The compound intake system operates the 3 valves in 2 stages. When engine speed is low, just one intake valve is used, but when engine speed increases, two intake valves are used. And to make this engine truly extraordinary, we added a turbocharger with an intercooler, and equipped the whole thing with a total electonic control system. Generally, high performance engines which have large inlet ports and high speed type valve timing enabling them to intake sufficient air for high performance at high speeds. The problem is here that when speed is dropped, combustion becomes unstable at the expense of torque and fuel consumption.
Technical Paper

Development of a New Combustion System (MCA-JET) in Gasoline Engine

1978-02-01
780007
A new combustion system - called MCA-JET- has been developed to improve combustion under the low speed, low load conditions typical of urban driving. Engines with this new system incorporate a special “jet valve”, in addition to the inlet and exhaust valves of the conventional combustion chamber, which directs air or a super-lean mixture towards the spark plug, and induces a strong swirling flow in the cylinder. This swirl persists during the compression and expansion processes, moves the mixture spirally and helps the flame to propagate. As a result, the combustion of lean mixtures, including those with exhaust gas recirculation, can be carried out rapidly and thus the fuel economy improved.
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