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Technical Paper

Development of thermoplastic elastomeric vacuum hose for engine control

2000-06-12
2000-05-0150
Vulcanized rubber hoses are difficult to recycle and have a complicated manufacturing process. Recently, we have developed the vacuum hose for engine control out of thermoplastic elastomers. As a result of this development, scrap material from the manufacturing process can be recycled and, in addition, about a 30 percent weight reduction and a 20 percent cost reduction are achievable by virtue of the lower specific gravity and by the more simplified manufacturing process. In order to assess the feasibility of using thermoplastic elastomers for vacuum hoses, we developed a heat aging simulation test method. This was achieved by first investigating the actual vehicle environmental conditions of currently used vacuum hoses by retrieving and examining these hoses from used vehicles. We then extrapolated what the condition of such hoses would be after being subjected to heat aging for 200,000 km of service in an actual vehicle, and applied this calculation to our newly developed hoses.
Technical Paper

Collapse of Thin-Walled Curved Beam with Closed-Hat Section - Part 2: Simulation by Plane Plastic Hinge Model

1990-02-01
900461
This paper describes a calculating method to predict the quasi-static collapsing behaviors of spot-welded closed-hat section curved beams under axial compression. The overall deformat ions and the local buckling modes of beams were calculated using a geometrical model. Force-displacement relations were predicted by a elastic-plastic structural analysis method using the ‘plastic hinge’ concept. Collapsing tests were made on beams which are differenting section size, rotation angle, and metal sheet thickness. Comparisons between the calculated and experimental results of deformed shapes of beams, the local buckling modes and the force displacement relations are discussed.
Technical Paper

Reduction of Cooling Fan Noise Caused by Crankshaft Torsional Vibration

1993-05-01
931334
Improvements of interior and exterior noise are important targets in vehicle engineering. There are many reports concerning the reduction of radiator cooling fan noise. But, most of those reports are associated with studies of air flow noise. A radiator cooling fan connected to a crankshaft occasionally radiates structure-borne noise in addition to air flow noise. This structure-borne noise is caused by fan blade vibration excited by torsional vibration of a crankshaft. In this paper, we surveyed the mechanism of the structure-borne noise and discussed some methods for the noise reduction. And, as a result, we developed one of the noise reduction technique aiming at isolation of crankshaft vibration by modifying viscosity of the oil in a fan clutch.
Technical Paper

Development of a New Torsional Rubber Damper for Diesel Engines

1993-05-01
931308
It is well-known that double-mass torsional rubber dampers which have two masses and springs in parallel are effective for controlling torsional vibration characteristics over a wide range of engine speed. On the occasion of reliability estimation of the rubber dampers, it is important to consider generation of heat in the rubber due to torsional vibration. By predicting generation of heat at the designing stage, optimum design of the torsional rubber dampers can be achieved. By development and application of this prediction method, a new type double-mass damper was developed. It provided higher vibration control characteristics and reliability than conventional viscous dampers, and also it provided advantages in terms of noise, productivity and weight.
Technical Paper

Prediction Method of Cooling System Performance

1993-03-01
930146
This paper describes a method of predicting cooling performance in order to obtain the optimum design of the cooling system and front-end shape in the early stage of car development. This method consists of four calculation parts: thermal load on the cooling system, air flow through the engine compartment, heat dissipation by the heat exchangers and temperature distribution within the cooling system. It outputs the coolant, engine oil, automatic transmission fluid (A.T.F.) and charge air temperatures in exchange for the input of several car, power plant, drive train, exterior shape and cooling system specifications. For the calculations, in addition to theoretical formulas, several experimental formulas are introduced. This method verification is shown by presenting a few test cases for the respective calculation parts and the final solution.
Technical Paper

Energy Absorption by the Plastic Deformation of Body Structural Members

1978-02-01
780368
Vehicle energy in head-on or rear-end collisions is mainly absorbed by the front or rear longitudinal members. This paper describes the methods of calculation of crush load and the energy absorbed during the static and dynamic crush of the sheet metal members with closed-hat section together with attached flanges or walls. Calculated results were compared with experiments including full-size automobile collisions. It is expected that the analysis considering the strain rate sensitivity will provide more accurate design information for improved automobile crash-worthiness.
Technical Paper

Engine Weight Reduction Using Alternative Light Materials

1992-09-01
922090
This paper presents several methods for reducing engine weight primarily through substitution with light-weight materials. The efficiency and performance of the engine were reviewed using a light-weight experimental engine (hereinafter called “weight-reduced engine”) constructed by the authors in order to investigate the possibility of practical use of the proposed weight reduction measures. The weight-reduced engine is based on an in-line 4-cylinder, 2.0 liter, gasoline engine with the base engine weight of 162 kg excluding engine oil and coolant and was reduced by 37 kg by applying alternative light-weight materiaLs and new manufacturing techniques. This corresponds to 23 % weight reduction. The materials used in the weight-reduced engine are 53 % steel, 33 % aluminum, 7 % plastics and 7 % other light-weight materials. It was found that by application of light-weight materials, the engine performance of the weight-reduced engine could be improved.
Technical Paper

A Study on a Simulation of a Head Form Impact Against Plastic Plates

1992-09-01
922085
A Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation was conducted to predict energy-absorbing characteristics in an impact of a head form against plastic plates. Static and dynamic material tests were conducted in order to determine material properties of the plastics. The properties were applied in an explicit FEM code. The FEM results were validated through the impact tests by the head form against the same plastic plates. It was proved that the FEM could simulate the test result well, when the precise material properties were introduced in the simulation. The method can be expected to be available to predict energy-absorbing characteristics during the impact by the head form against automobile plastic components such as shell portions of instrument panels.
Technical Paper

Development of Damping SMC and Its Application as Material for a Rockercover

1996-02-01
960146
When replacing a metal engine part with plastic, it is necessary to regard vibration damping as one of the important factors in terms of noise reduction as well as strength and heat resistance as being characteristics of the material. Plastics are far better for vibration damping than steel or aluminum, but this property is reduced by the addition of glassfiber-reinforced or high heat-resisting resins. We have taken notice of SMC (Sheet Molding Compound) which has the excellent strength and heat resistance properties and studied it in order to increase its vibration damping property. Since organic polymers show the peak value for vibration damping performance in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), we studied a method to shift the Tg near the operating temperature region in order to improve the vibration damping property.
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