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Technical Paper

Application of Common Rail Fuel Injection System to a Heavy Duty Diesel Engine

1994-11-01
942294
In the diesel engine industry, the growing trends are toward wider use of electronically controlled high pressure fuel injection equipment to provide better engine performance, while conforming to the stringent exhaust emission standards. Although there have been some recent announcements of a diesel engine that applies an electronically controlled common rail type fuel injection system, there is little literature published about any attempt to reduce both exhaust emissions and noise and to improve engine performance by varying injection pressure and injection timing independently and introducing pilot injection in combination. This paper describes the details of a study made on the parameters associated with injection timing, injection pressure and pilot injection and the procedures for their optimization, with an electronically controlled common rail type fuel injection system installed in an in-line 6-cylinder 6.9 liter turbocharged and intercooled DI diesel engine.
Technical Paper

New Mitsubishi V8 19-Liter Turbocharged and Intercooled Diesel Engine

1997-05-01
971673
Mitsubishi Motors Corporation (MMC) has developed a new V configured 8 cylinder turbocharged and intercooled diesel engine (8M22T1) for the heavy-duty truck market. The engine is one of the first in its class to feature a common rail fuel injection system. This advanced engine management system was selected to meet the challenges of ever tightening emission regulation, specifically in the areas of smoke and noise. The 8M22T1 embodies a number of design innovations which have resulted in significant improvements in performance, fuel economy, durability and reliability.
Technical Paper

Mitsubishi New 12.0-Liter Turbocharged and Intercooled Diesel Engine

1990-09-01
901572
To meet the increasingly strong demand for high-speed transportation, better fuel economy, higher reliability and the social requirements for more strict Japanese regulations against exhaust and noise emissions, Mitsubishi Motors Corporation has recently developed the 6D40T1 in-line 6-cylinder, 12.0-liter turbocharged and intercooled diesel engine for heavy-duty trucks. This engine meets the 1989 Japanese exhaust emission regulations and has an output of 258 kW. To achieve both fuel economy and good drivability, Mitsubishi's original, electronically-controlled fuel injection system was adopted. The so-called prestroke-controlled fuel injection pump is capable of flexible and precise control of both fuel injection rate and timing. The basic structure of the 6D40T1 was designed with high rigidity to permit high cylinder pressures. In addition, to reduce friction and heat losses, a 4-valve design, roller cam followers with needle roller bearings, and shortened exhaust ports were adopted.
Technical Paper

New Mitsubishi V8 20 Liter Diesel Engine

1992-02-01
920085
In the heavy-duty commercial vehicle market in Japan, particularly in the segment of dump trucks and tractors, naturally aspirated engines maintain a dominant market share because of their superior torque characteristics in the low speed range. In order to meet the ever increasing needs for higher speeds of transportation, better fuel economy and higher reliability, and the needs for increasingly strict exhaust emission regulations, Mitsubishi Motors Corporation (MMC) has developed the 8M20, a 20 liter V8 diesel engine. The '92 model series of “THE GREAT”, MMC's main heavy-duty trucks, has featured this new and powerful engine and has been in the market place since October, 1991. The 8M20 is a naturally aspirated engine that provides an output of 294kW/2200rpm, complying with the current Japanese exhaust emission regulations.
Technical Paper

Technology for Meeting the 1991 U.S.A. Exhaust Emission Regulations on Heavy Duty Diesel Engine

1990-10-01
902233
Protection of the Earth's environment by means of energy saving and cleaning up of air pollution on a global scale is one of the most important subjects in the world today. Because of this, the requirements for better fuel economy and cleaner exhaust emissions of internal combustion engines have been getting stronger, and, in particular, simultaneous reduction in nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from heavy-duty diesel engines (HDDEs) without degrading fuel economy has become a major subject. Mitsubishi Motors Corporation (MM) has been selling diesel-powered heavy-duty trucks in the U.S. market since 1985 and has agressively carried out development work for meeting the 1991 model year exhaust emission standards.
Technical Paper

Technology for Meeting the 1994 USA Exhaust Emission Regulations on Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

1993-10-01
932654
Recent global environmental problems which have come to light must be solved for ensuring the survival of the human race. And it is of the utmost importance that we give to our descendants a world full of nature and beauty. In the past years Mitsubishi Motors Corporation (MMC) has long been positive in research and the development activities so as to satisfy the demands for low emission and good fuel economy vehicles. (1) As one example of our research efforts, the technology that will meet the US '94 HDDE exhaust emission regulations, which is one of the most stringent regulations in the world, is described in this paper. The exhaust emissions were reduced by improvement of combustion, using the pre-stroke control type fuel injection pump and optimizing the combustion chamber shape. Efforts were also made to improve the oil consumption, in order to reduce PM (Particulate Matter) emission.
Technical Paper

New Quiescent Combustion System for Heavy–Duty Diesel Engines to Overcome Exhaust Emissions and Fuel Consumption Trade–Off

2000-06-19
2000-01-1811
In the next few years, the USA, EU, and Japan plan to introduce very stringent exhaust emissions regulations for heavy–duty diesel engines, in order to enhance the protection air quality. This builds upon the heavy–duty diesel engine exhaust emissions regulations already in effect. At the same time, improvement in fuel consumption of heavy–duty diesel engines will be very important for lowering vehicle operating costs, conserving fossil fuel resources, and reduction of CO2 (greenhouse gas) levels. This paper presents a detailed review of a quiescent combustion system for a heavy–duty diesel engine, which offers breakthrough performance in terms of the exhaust emissions – fuel consumption trade–off, compared with the more conventional swirl supported combustion system. This conclusion is supported by experimental results comparing quiescent and swirl supported versions of various combustion system configurations.
Technical Paper

Development of PM Trap System for Urban Buses

1996-02-01
960470
In response to stringent particulate matter (PM) emission regulations worldwide, developments of diesel particulate filter (DPF) continue apace in addition to engine modification for PM reduction. Particularly with buses used in urban areas, reduction methods in black smoke emissions are being researched in addition to the efforts to satisfy the aforementioned PM regulations. The system described in this paper was developed for use mainly with buses in large urban concentrations. The system described in this paper mainly consists of both wall-flow monolith filters for filtration of PM emissions and electric heaters for regeneration. A key feature of this system is that exhaust gas is used for effective combustion of PM during regeneration. With conventional systems, airpumps have been used to feed air for PM combustion during regeneration. With the new system, however, the use of an air pump was discontinued due to durability and cost considerations.
Technical Paper

Development of Mitsubishi Flexible Fuel Vehicle

1991-02-01
910861
A flexible fuel vehicle (FFV) was evaluated through various tests for its potential as an alternative to the conventional gasoline vehicle. This paper presents the systems incorporated in the FFV and the test results. 50,000 mile emission durability tests were also performed and the potential of the FFV as a “Low Emission Vehicle” was assessed. As the result of extensive engineering work, we successfully developed a Galant FFV which exhibits very good durability and reliability. The emission control system which we have developed demonstrated that the vehicle has a good potential to comply with the California formaldehyde emission standard of 15 mg/mile. However, due to the large portion of unburnt methanol in the tail-pipe emissions, FFVs will have more difficulty than gasoline vehicles in meeting non-methane organic gas (NMOG) standards applicable to “Low Emission Vehicles”.
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