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Technical Paper

Relationship Between MTBE-Blended Gasoline Properties and Warm-Up Driveability

1995-10-01
952519
The relationship between MTBE-blended gasoline properties and warm-up driveability is investigated by focusing on the transient combustion air-fuel ratio that strongly relates to the combustion state of the engine. As a result, although warm-up driveability of MTBE-free gasoline has a high correlation with 50% distillation temperature (T50) and a high correlation with 100°C distillation volume (E100), the correlation is found to be low when blended with MTBE. Various formulas that improve correlation with peak excess air ratio (λ) by correcting T50 and E100 for the amount of MTBE blended are examined. The formula for which the highest determination coefficient is obtained is proposed as a new driveability index (DI) that can also be applied to MTBE-blended gasoline. In addition, the effect on driveability by gasoline base materials using this new DI also is investigated.
Technical Paper

Mixing Control Strategy for Engine Performance Improvement in a Gasoline Direct Injection Engine

1998-02-23
980158
Spray motion visualization, mixture strength measurement, flame spectral analyses and flame behavior observation were performed in order to elucidate the mixture preparation and the combustion processes in Mitsubishi GDI engine. The effects of in-cylinder flow called reverse tumble on the charge stratification were clarified. It preserves the mixture inside the spherical piston cavity, and extends the optimum injection timing range. Mixture strength at the spark plug and at the spark timing can be controlled by changing the injection timing. It was concluded that reverse tumble plays a significant role for extending the freedom of mixing. The characteristics of the stratified charge combustion were clarified through the flame radiation analyses. A first flame front with UV luminescence propagates rapidly and covers all over the combustion chamber at the early stage of combustion.
Technical Paper

Influence of Valve Noise on Knock Detection in Spark Ignition Engines

1988-02-01
880084
Valve noise is one of the factors that deteriorate the signal-to-noise ratio in the detection of combustion knock in spark ignition engines by means of a knock control system with a conventional knock sensor and a higher frequency band-pass filter. It was determined that one of the principal mechanisms of valve noise increase is the eccentricity between the valve seat face and the insert seat face at valve contact in addition to excess valve contact speed. One of the reasons for this eccentricity is the offset between the centers of the valve guide and insert caused by cylinder head distortion due to fastening of the cylinder head and thermal distortion of the insert. Other reasons include excess clearance caused by the abrasion of the valve guide and stem, and valve tilt increase caused by inherent valve spring bend.
Technical Paper

Development of Compact, Water-Cooled Engine K2AS

1983-09-12
831300
Mitsubishi has developed the new, compact, water-cooled vertical type 2-cylinder diesel engine model K2AS and brought it to market in spring of '82. The K2AS is a small-sized engine of 451 cc total displacement and 10HP/3600 rpm maximum output. Its weight of 58 kg is light enough to use this diesel engine for various machines which have formerly been driven by gasoline engines. The well matched combustion chamber and injection system realize low fuel consumption, low noise and easy engine starting. High durability is also assured by various kinds of reliability evaluation. Features of K2AS are outlined below.
Technical Paper

Development of Mitsubishi Flexible Fuel Vehicle

1991-02-01
910861
A flexible fuel vehicle (FFV) was evaluated through various tests for its potential as an alternative to the conventional gasoline vehicle. This paper presents the systems incorporated in the FFV and the test results. 50,000 mile emission durability tests were also performed and the potential of the FFV as a “Low Emission Vehicle” was assessed. As the result of extensive engineering work, we successfully developed a Galant FFV which exhibits very good durability and reliability. The emission control system which we have developed demonstrated that the vehicle has a good potential to comply with the California formaldehyde emission standard of 15 mg/mile. However, due to the large portion of unburnt methanol in the tail-pipe emissions, FFVs will have more difficulty than gasoline vehicles in meeting non-methane organic gas (NMOG) standards applicable to “Low Emission Vehicles”.
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