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Technical Paper

The Development of an Automotive Catalyst using a Thin Wall (4 mil/400cpsi) Substrate

1996-02-01
960557
Since the monolithic ceramic substrate was introduced for automotive catalytic converters, the reduction of the substrate wall thickness has been a continuing requirement to reduce pressure drop and improve catalytic performance. The thin wall substrate of 0.10 mm (4 mil) thick wall/400 cpsi cell density has been introduced to production by achieving mechanical strength equivalent to a conventional 0.15 mm (6 mil)/400 cpsi substrate. Although a round cross-section substrate can have a reduced catalyst volume compared to an oval cross-section substrate because of uniform gas flow distribution, the smaller cross-section of the round substrate increases pressure drop. The thin wall technology was applied to the round substrate to offset the pressure drop increase and to further improve catalytic performance.
Technical Paper

Development of Wall-Flow Type Diesel Particulate Filter System with Reverse Pulse Air Regeneration

1994-03-01
940237
The effects of the factors of reverse pulse air regeneration; pulse air pressure, pulse air time and pulse air interval, were evaluated. Pulse air pressure significantly affects a DPF's pressure drop increase. Pulse air time and pulse air interval do not greatly affect a DPF's pressure drop. Current DPFs and samples with modified materials were tested. The pressure drop increse varied with the material properties, such as mean pore size and porosity. Current DPFs are applicable to a DPF system with reverse pulse air regeneration. There is the possibility to get an optimum DPF for the reverse pulse air regeneration system by changing the mean pore size, porosity and/or other properties.
Technical Paper

Development of Improved SCRonDPF Design for Future Tighter Regulations and Reduced System Packaging

2018-04-03
2018-01-0344
With the push towards more stringent on-road US heavy duty diesel regulations (i.e. HD GHG Phase 2 and the proposed ARB 20 mg/bhp-hr NOx), emission system packaging has grown critical while improving fuel economy and NOx emissions. The ARB regulations are expected to be implemented post 2023 while regulation for EU off-road segment will begin from 2019. The regulation, called Stage V, will introduce particle number (PN) regulation requiring EU OEMs to introduce a diesel particulate filter (DPF) while customer demands will require the OEMs to maintain current emission system packaging. A viable market solution to meet these requirements, especially for EU Stage V being implemented first, is a DPF coated with a selective catalyst reduction (SCR) washcoat (i.e. SCRonDPF).
Technical Paper

Study on Next Generation Diesel Particulate Filter

2009-04-20
2009-01-0292
Although diesel engines are superior to gasoline engines in terms of the demand to reduce CO2 emissions, diesel engines suffer from the problem of emitting Particulate Matter (PM). Therefore, a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) has to be fitted in the engine exhaust aftertreatment system. From the viewpoint of reducing CO2 emissions, there is a strong demand to reduce the exhaust system pressure drop and for DPF designs that are able to help reduce the pressure drop. A wall flow DPF having a novel wall pore structure design for reducing pressure drop, increasing robustness and increasing filtration efficiency is presented. The filter offers a linear relationship between PM loading and pressure drop, offering lower pressure drop and greater accuracy in estimating the accumulated PM amount from pressure drop. First, basic experiments were performed on small plate test samples having various pore structure designs.
Technical Paper

High Porosity DPF Design for Integrated SCR Functions

2012-04-16
2012-01-0843
Diesel engines are more fuel efficient due to their high thermal efficiency, compared to gasoline engines and therefore, have a higher potential to reduce CO2 emissions. Since diesel engines emit higher amounts of Particulate Matter (PM), DPF systems have been introduced. Today, DPF systems have become a standard technology. Nevertheless, with more stringent NOx emission limits and CO2 targets, additional NOx emission control is needed. For high NOx conversion efficiency, SCR catalysts technology shows high potential. Due to higher temperature at the close coupled position and space restrictions, an integrated SCR concept on the DPFs is preferred. A high SCR catalyst loading will be required to have high conversion efficiency over a wide range of engine operations which causes high pressure for conventional DPF materials.
Technical Paper

Influence of Material Properties and Pore Design Parameters on Non-Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter Performance with Ash Accumulation

2012-09-10
2012-01-1728
Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are a common component in emission-control systems of modern clean diesel vehicles. Several DPF materials have been used in various applications. Silicone Carbide (SiC) is common for passenger vehicles because of its thermal robustness derived from its high specific gravity and heat conductivity. However, a segmented structure is required to relieve thermal stress due to SiC's higher coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Cordierite (Cd) is a popular material for heavy-duty vehicles. Cordierite which has less mass per given volume, exhibits superior light-off performance, and is also adequate for use in larger monolith structures, due to its lower CTE. SiC and cordierite are recognized as the most prevalent DPF materials since the 2000's. The DPF traps not only combustible particles (soot) but also incombustible ash. Ash accumulates in the DPF and remains in the filter until being physically removed.
Technical Paper

Development of New High Porosity Diesel Particulate Filter for Integrated SCR Technology/Catalyst

2015-09-01
2015-01-2018
Diesel engines are widely used to reduce CO2 emission due to its higher thermal efficiency over gasoline engines. Considering long term CO2 targets, as well as tighter gas emission, especially NOx, diesel engines must become cleaner and more efficient. However, there is a tradeoff between CO2 and NOx and, naturally, engine developers choose lower CO2 because NOx can be reduced by a catalytic converter, such as a SCR catalyst. Lower CO2 engine calibration, unfortunately, leads to lower exhaust gas temperatures, which delays the activation of the catalytic converter. In order to overcome both problems, higher engine out NOx emission and lower exhaust gas temperatures, close-coupled a diesel particulate filter (DPF) system with integration of SCR catalyst technology is preferred. For SCR catalyst activity, it is known that the catalyst loading amount has an influence on NOx performance, so a high SCR catalyst loading will be required.
Technical Paper

Real-Time On-Board Measurement of Mass Emission of NOx, Fuel Consumption, Road Load, and Engine Output for Diesel Vehicles

2000-03-06
2000-01-1141
Regulatory compliance measurements for vehicle emissions are generally performed in well equipped test facilities using chassis dynamometers that simulate on-road conditions. There is also a requirement for obtaining accurate information from vehicles as they operate on the road. An on-board system has been developed to measure real-time mass emission of NOx, fuel consumption, road load, and engine output. The system consists of a dedicated data recorder and a variety of sensors that measure air-to-fuel ratios, NOx concentrations, intake air flow rates, and ambient temperature, pressure and humidity. The system can be placed on the passenger seat and operate without external power. This paper describes in detail the configuration and signal processing techniques used by the on-board measurement system. The authors explain the methods and algorithms used to obtain (1) real-time mass emission of NOx, (2) real-time fuel consumption, (3) road load, and (4) engine output.
Technical Paper

Study on Reliability of Wall-Flow Type Diesel Particulate Filter

2004-03-08
2004-01-0959
In this paper a method of DPF(Diesel Particulate Filter) lifetime estimation against the thermal stress is presented. In the method, experimentally measured material fatigue property and DPF temperature distributions under various conditions including regeneration mode were used to perform FEM stress analyses and the estimation of DPF lifetime and allowable stresses. From the viewpoint of the system design, to prevent DPF damages such as cracks created through thermal stress or melting, controlling the amount of PM accumulation is important. In this study, the pressure difference behavior under each of PM accumulation mode and regeneration mode was investigated experimentally. The experimental results showed different pressure drop behaviors in accumulation and regeneration. DPFs were observed in detail after PM accumulation and during regeneration to discuss mechanisms of the pressure difference behavior.
Technical Paper

Engine Bench and Vehicle Durability Tests of Si bonded SiC Particulate Filters

2004-03-08
2004-01-0952
Modern filter systems allow a significant reduction of diesel particulate emissions. The new silicon bonded silicon carbide particulate filters (Si-SiC filters) play an important role in this application, because they provide flexibility in terms of mean pore size and porosity and also have a high thermal shock capability to meet both engineering targets and emission limits for 2005 and beyond. Particulate filters are exposed to high temperatures and a harsh chemical environment in the exhaust gas of diesel vehicles. This paper will present further durability evaluation results of the new Si bonded SiC particulate filters which have been collected in engine bench tests and vehicle durability runs. The Si-SiC filters passed both 100 and 200 regeneration cycles under severe ageing conditions and without any problems. The used filters were subjected to a variety of analytical tests. The back pressure and ash distribution were determined. The filter material was also analysed.
Technical Paper

The Effect of SiC Properties on the Performance of Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter(DPF)

2003-03-03
2003-01-0383
The DPF(Diesel Particulate Filter) has been established as a key technology in reducing diesel PM emission. Also Catalyzed-DPF Systems are viewed as the next generation DPF System in the automotive sector, replacing the current Fuel Additive System. The performance requirements of the DPF-equipped vehicle are good fuel economy, good driving performance, high PM regeneration performance of accumulated soot and high durability. In this paper the effect of Catalyzed-DPF characteristics, such as porosity, pore size, cell structure and catalyst loading have been defined on pressure drop, filtration efficiency, regeneration efficiency and regeneration behavior.
Technical Paper

Effect of Cell Shape on Mass Transfer and Pressure Loss

2003-03-03
2003-01-0659
To meet stringent emissions regulations, high conversion efficiency is required. This calls for advanced catalyst substrates with thinner walls and higher cell density. Higher cell density is needed because it brings higher mass transfer from the gas to the substrate wall. Basically, the increase in total surface area (TSA) causes higher mass transfer. However, not only the TSA, but the cell shape also has a great effect on mass transfer. There are two main kinds of substrates. One is the extruded ceramic substrate and the other is the metal foil type substrate. These have different cell shapes due to different manufacturing processes. For the extruded ceramic substrate, it is possible to fabricate various cell shapes such as triangle, hexagon, etc. as well as the square shape. The difference in the cell shape changes not only the mass transfer rate, but also causes pressure loss change. This is an important item to be considered in the substrate design.
Technical Paper

Performance of Next Generation Gasoline Particulate Filter Materials under RDE Conditions

2019-04-02
2019-01-0980
In order to meet the challenging CO2 targets beyond 2020 without sacrificing performance, Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) technology, in combination with turbo charging technology, is expanding in the automotive industry. However, while this technology does provide a significant CO2 reduction, one side effect is increased Particle Number (PN) emission. As a result, from September 2017, GDI vehicles in Europe are required to meet the stringent PN emission limits of 6x1011 #/km under the Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedure (WLTP). In addition, it is required to meet PN emission of 9x1011 #/km under Real Driving Emission (RDE) testing, which includes a Conformity Factor (CF) of 1.5 to account for current measurement inaccuracies on the road. This introduction of RDE testing in Europe and China will especially provide a unique challenge for the design of exhaust after-treatment systems due to its wide boundary conditions.
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