Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 3 of 3
Technical Paper

Effect of Low Cetane Fuels on Diesel Engine Performance 2-Combustion Performance of a Detroit Diesel 3-71 Engine

1985-02-01
850052
Four experimental diesel fuels with cetane numbers (CN) of 40, 37, 35 and 27 have been tested in a Detroit Diesel Allison 3-71 engine using the standard N65 injectors. The 35 CN fuel was a blend of distillates from conventional and tar sands crude with hydrogen treated cat-cracked stock. This provided a fuel typical of the 1990's and beyond, with substantial levels of aromatic and cracked components. The 27 CN fuel was a blend of the same components as the 35 CN fuel only with a larger portion of the hydrogen treated cat-cracked component. The 40 CN fuel was identical to the 35 CN fuel with a .2% DII-3 Diesel Ignition Improver. The 37 CN fuel was a blend of Canadian winter diesel fuel oil and 24% Light Cycle Oil (LCO), The four experimental fuels and one reference fuel were tested at four load levels at each of three engine speeds. The performance and combustion characteristics were compared with the physical and chemical fuel properties.
Technical Paper

Performance/Combustion Characteristics of Six Canadian Alternative Fuels Tested in a Bombardier Medium Speed Diesel

1985-06-01
851224
Six experimental fuels representative of Canadian future fuel options were tested against a reference fuel in a Bombardier 12 cylinder, 4 stroke, 3000 hp, medium speed diesel. The reference fuel was a straight run ASTM #2-D. The first test fuel blend consisted of heavy atmospheric gas oil that extended the distillation range (higher end point) of the other blend component ASTM #2-D. The second fuel was a blend of a distillate cut from a mixture of conventional and tar sands crude with hydrogen treated cracked stock. This provided a fuel with substantial levels of aromatic and cracked components. The third fuel was gas oil side stream: a low cetane number, high aromatics level tar sands distillate. The fourth fuel was an equal portion blend of tar sands crude components, gas oil side-stream and heavy unifined gas oil. The fifth fuel was a blend of ASTM #2-D heating oil and a substantial portion of stabilized cracked stock.
Technical Paper

High Speed Diesel Performance/Combustion Characteristics Correlated with Structural Composition of Tar Sands Derived Experimental Fuels

1985-02-01
850240
Two Canadian tar sands derived experimental diesel fuels with cetane numbers of 26 and 36 and a reference fuel with a cetane number of 47 were tested in a Deutz (F1L511D), single cylinder, A stroke, naturally aspirated research engine. The fuels were tested at intake and cooling air temperatures of 30 and 0°C. The 36 cetane number fuel was tested with advanced, rated and retarded injection timings. Poor engine speed stability at light loads and excessive rates of combustion pressure rise were experienced with the lowest cetane number fuel. Detailed performance/combustion behavior is presented and a correlation with fuel structural composition is made. The analytical techniques used to characterize the fuels included liquid chromatography, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (PNMR).
X