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Technical Paper

Extent of Oxidation of Hydrocarbons Desorbing from the Lubricant Oil Layer in Spark-ignition Engines

1996-02-01
960069
The extent of oxidation of hydrocarbons desorbing from the oil layer has been measured directly in a hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited engine in which the lubricant oil was doped with a single component hydrocarbon. The amount of hydrocarbon desorbed and oxidized could be measured simultaneously as the dopant was only source of carbon-containing species. The fraction oxidized was strongly dependent on engine load, hydrogen fuel-air ratio and dopant chemical reactivity, but only modestly dependent on spark timing and nitrogen dilution levels below 20 percent. Fast FID measurements at the cylinder exit showed that the surviving hydrocarbons emerge late in the exhaust stroke.
Technical Paper

Effect of Low Cetane Fuels on Diesel Engine Performance 2-Combustion Performance of a Detroit Diesel 3-71 Engine

1985-02-01
850052
Four experimental diesel fuels with cetane numbers (CN) of 40, 37, 35 and 27 have been tested in a Detroit Diesel Allison 3-71 engine using the standard N65 injectors. The 35 CN fuel was a blend of distillates from conventional and tar sands crude with hydrogen treated cat-cracked stock. This provided a fuel typical of the 1990's and beyond, with substantial levels of aromatic and cracked components. The 27 CN fuel was a blend of the same components as the 35 CN fuel only with a larger portion of the hydrogen treated cat-cracked component. The 40 CN fuel was identical to the 35 CN fuel with a .2% DII-3 Diesel Ignition Improver. The 37 CN fuel was a blend of Canadian winter diesel fuel oil and 24% Light Cycle Oil (LCO), The four experimental fuels and one reference fuel were tested at four load levels at each of three engine speeds. The performance and combustion characteristics were compared with the physical and chemical fuel properties.
Technical Paper

Performance/Combustion Characteristics of Six Canadian Alternative Fuels Tested in a Bombardier Medium Speed Diesel

1985-06-01
851224
Six experimental fuels representative of Canadian future fuel options were tested against a reference fuel in a Bombardier 12 cylinder, 4 stroke, 3000 hp, medium speed diesel. The reference fuel was a straight run ASTM #2-D. The first test fuel blend consisted of heavy atmospheric gas oil that extended the distillation range (higher end point) of the other blend component ASTM #2-D. The second fuel was a blend of a distillate cut from a mixture of conventional and tar sands crude with hydrogen treated cracked stock. This provided a fuel with substantial levels of aromatic and cracked components. The third fuel was gas oil side stream: a low cetane number, high aromatics level tar sands distillate. The fourth fuel was an equal portion blend of tar sands crude components, gas oil side-stream and heavy unifined gas oil. The fifth fuel was a blend of ASTM #2-D heating oil and a substantial portion of stabilized cracked stock.
Technical Paper

A New Approach to Ethanol Utilization: High Efficiency and Low NOx in an Engine Operating on Simulated Reformed Ethanol

2008-10-06
2008-01-2415
The use of hydrogen as a fuel supplement for lean-burn engines at higher compression ratios has been studied extensively in recent years, with good promise of performance and efficiency gains. With the advances in reformer technology, the use of a gaseous fuel stock, comprising of substantially higher fractions of hydrogen and other flammable reformate species, could provide additional improvements. This paper presents the performance and emission characteristics of a gas mixture of equal volumes of hydrogen, CO, and methane. It has recently been reported that this gas mixture can be produced by reforming of ethanol at comparatively low temperature, around 300C. Experiments were performed on a 1.8-liter passenger-car Nissan engine modified for single-cylinder operation. Special pistons were made so that compression ratios ranging from CR= 9.5 to 17 could be used. The lean limit was extended beyond twice stoichiometric (up to lambda=2.2).
Technical Paper

Reduction of Cooling Loss in Hydrogen Combustion by Direct Injection Stratified Charge

2003-10-27
2003-01-3094
Hydrogen can be readily used in spark-ignition engines as a clean alternative to fossil fuels. However, a larger burning velocity and a shorter quenching distance for hydrogen as compared with hydrocarbons bring a larger cooling loss from burning gas to the combustion-chamber wall. Because of the large cooling loss, the thermal efficiency of a hydrogen-fueled engine is sometimes lower than that of a conventionally fueled engine. Therefore, the reduction of the cooling loss is very important for improving the thermal efficiency in hydrogen-combustion engines. On the other hand, the direct-injection stratified charge can suppress knocking in spark-ignition engines at near stoichiometric overall mixture conditions. Because this is attributed to a leaner end gas, the stratification can lead to a lowered temperature of burning gas around the wall and a reduced cooling loss.
Journal Article

Assessment of Gasoline Direct Injection Engine Cold Start Particulate Emission Sources

2017-03-28
2017-01-0795
The gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine particulate emission sources are assessed under cold start conditions: the fast idle and speed/load combinations representative of the 1st acceleration in the US FTP. The focus is on the accumulation mode particle number (PN) emission. The sources are non-fuel, combustion of the premixed charge, and liquid fuel film. The non-fuel emissions are measured by operating the engine with premixed methane/air or hydrogen/air. Then the PN level is substantially lower than what is obtained with normal GDI operation; thus non-fuel contribution to PN is small. When operating with stoichiometric premixed gasoline/air, the PN level is comparable to the non-fuel level; thus premixed-stoichiometric mixture combustion does not significantly generate particulates. For fuel rich premixed gasoline/air, PN increases dramatically when lambda is less than 0.7 to 0.8.
Journal Article

A Comparative Assessment of Electric Propulsion Systems in the 2030 US Light-Duty Vehicle Fleet

2008-04-14
2008-01-0459
This paper quantifies the potential of electric propulsion systems to reduce petroleum use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the 2030 U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet. The propulsion systems under consideration include gasoline hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs), fuel-cell hybrid vehicles (FCVs), and battery-electric vehicles (BEVs). The performance and cost of key enabling technologies were extrapolated over a 25-30 year time horizon. These results were integrated with software simulations to model vehicle performance and tank-to-wheel energy consumption. Well-to-wheel energy and GHG emissions of future vehicle technologies were estimated by integrating the vehicle technology evaluation with assessments of different fuel pathways. The results show that, if vehicle size and performance remain constant at present-day levels, these electric propulsion systems can reduce or eliminate the transport sector's reliance on petroleum.
Journal Article

Study of On-Board Ammonia (NH3) Generation for SCR Operation

2010-04-12
2010-01-1071
Mechanisms of NH₃ generation using LNT-like catalysts have been studied in a bench reactor over a wide range of temperatures, flow rates, reformer catalyst types and synthetic exhaust-gas compositions. The experiments showed that the on board production of sufficient quantities of ammonia on board for SCR operation appeared feasible, and the results identified the range of conditions for the efficient generation of ammonia. In addition, the effects of reformer catalysts using the water-gas-shift reaction as an in-situ source of the required hydrogen for the reactions are also illustrated. Computations of the NH₃ and NOx kinetics have also been carried out and are presented. Design and impregnation of the SCR catalyst in proximity to the ammonia source is the next logical step. A heated synthetic-exhaust gas flow bench was used for the experiments under carefully controlled simulated exhaust compositions.
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