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Technical Paper

A Study of a DISI Engine with a Centrally Located High-pressure Fuel Injector

2004-10-25
2004-01-2944
Vehicle manufacturers developed two mixture formation concepts for the first generation of gasoline direct-injection (GDI) engines. Both the wall-guided concept with reverse tumble air motion or swirl air motion and the air-guided concept with tumble air motion have the fuel injector located at the side of the combustion chamber between the two intake ports. This paper proposes a new GDI concept. It has the fuel injector located at almost the center of the combustion chamber and with the spark plug positioned nearby. An oval bowl is provided in the piston crown. The fuel spray is injected at high fuel pressures of up to 100 MPa. The spray creates strong air motion in the combustion chamber and reaches the piston bowl. The wall of the piston bowl changes the direction of the spray and air motion, producing an upward flow. The spray and air flow rise and reach the spark plug.
Journal Article

Experimental Method Extracting Dominant Acoustic Mode Shapes for Automotive Interior Acoustic Field Coupled with the Body Structure

2013-05-13
2013-01-1905
For a numerical model of vibro-acoustic coupling analysis, such as a vehicle noise and vibration, both structural and acoustical dynamic characteristics are necessary to replicate the physical phenomenon. The accuracy of the analysis is not enough for substituting a prototype phase with a digital phase in the product development phases. One of the reasons is the difficulty of addressing the interior acoustical characteristics due to the complexity of the acoustical transfer paths, which are a duct and a small hole of trim parts in a vehicle. Those complex features affect on the nodal locations and the body coupling surface of acoustic mode shapes. In order to improve the accuracy of the analysis, the physical mechanisms of those features need to be extracted from experimental testing.
Technical Paper

Development of a New 2L Gasoline VC-Turbo Engine with the World’s First Variable Compression Ratio Technology

2018-04-03
2018-01-0371
A new 2L gasoline turbo engine, named KR20DDET was developed with the world’s first mass-producible variable compression turbo (VC-Turbo) technology using a multi-link variable compression ratio (VCR) mechanism. It is well known that increasing the compression ratio improves gasoline engine thermal efficiency. However, there has always been a compromise for engine designers because of the trade-off between increasing the compression ratio and knocking. At Nissan we have been working on VCR technology for more than 20 years and have now successfully applied this technology to a mass production engine. This technology uses a multi-link mechanism to change the top and bottom dead center positions, thereby allowing the compression ratio to be continuously changed. The VC-Turbo engine with this technology can vary the compression ratio from 14:1 for obtaining high thermal efficiency to 8:1 for delivering high torque by taking advantage of the strong synergy with turbocharging.
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