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Technical Paper

Application of a Control System CAD Program to a Study of an Electronic Engine Control System

1994-03-01
940658
Automotive electronic control systems have tended to become more complex in recent years as a result of stronger requirements for environmental friendliness and higher levels of driveability. The first step in developing a control system is to study the required logic and system configuration at the initial stage of new vehicle development. The authors have incorporated an engine-vehicle model in a control system CAD program to simulate the logic needed for various control tasks. This paper presents a typical application in which a behavior of some outputs, such as engine torque and acceleration, was analyzed, and the electronic controls needed to assure driveability were identified. The construction and operation of a controller-in-the-loop system are also described.
Technical Paper

Summary report of Japan Clean Air Program diesel and diesel fuel activities

2007-07-23
2007-01-1952
Diesel emissions are significant issue worldwide, and emissions requirements have become so tough that. the application of after-treatment systems is now indispensable in many countries To meet even more stringent future emissions requirements, it has become apparent that the improvement of market fuel quality is essential as well as the development in engine and exhaust after-treatment technology. Japan Clean Air Program II (JCAP II) is being conducted to assess the direction of future technologies through the evaluation of current automobile and fuel technologies and consequently to realize near zero emissions and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction. In this program, effects of fuel properties on the performance of diesel engines and a vehicle equipped with two types of diesel NOx emission after-treatment devices, a Urea-SCR system and a NOx storage reduction (NSR) catalyst system, were examined.
Technical Paper

Effects of Fuel Properties on the Performance of Advanced Diesel NOx Aftertreatment Devices

2006-10-16
2006-01-3443
In the Japan Clean Air Program II (JCAP II) Diesel WG, effects of fuel properties on the performance of two types of diesel NOx emission aftertreatment devices, a Urea-SCR system and a NOx storage reduction (NSR) catalyst system, were examined. For a Urea-SCR system, the NOx emission reduction performance with and without an oxidation catalyst installed in front of the SCR catalyst at low exhaust gas temperature operation was compared. For an NSR catalyst system, the effect of fuel sulfur on both emissions and fuel economy during 50,000 km driving was examined. Furthermore, effects of other fuel properties such as distillation on exhaust emissions were investigated. The results show that sulfur is the influential factor for both devices. Namely, high NOx emission reduction performance of the Urea-SCR system with the oxidation catalyst at low exhaust gas temperature operation is influenced by sulfur.
Technical Paper

Study of an Integrated Diesel Engine-CVT Control Algorithm for Improving Drivability and Exhaust Emission Performance

2001-10-01
2001-01-3452
Diesel engines have attracted more attention in recent years as one means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from motor vehicles. One of the major issues for diesel engines is exhaust emissions performance. Diesel engines also face various difficulties in providing the driving force demanded by the driver because of their greater inertia than that of gasoline engines. Meanwhile, continuously variable transmissions (CVTs) have been popularized as gearboxes that execute ratio changes continuously without generating shift shock. The aim of this research is to achieve higher levels of drivability and exhaust emissions performance by mating a CVT to a diesel engine and making maximum use of the continuous ratio change capability. An integrated engine-CVT control algorithm that can freely set the driving force and also the engine operating conditions for generating that driving force has been developed through this study.
Journal Article

Development of a Diesel Emission Catalyst System for Meeting US SULEV Standards

2008-04-14
2008-01-0449
In recent years, catalyst systems such as a lean NOx trap (LNT) catalyst system and a urea selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system have been developed to obtain cleaner diesel emissions. At Nissan, we developed an emission control system for meeting Tier 2 Bin 5 requirements in 2003. On the basis of that technology, a new HC-NOx trap catalyst system has now been developed that complies with the SULEV standards without increasing the catalyst volume and precious metal loading. Compliance with the SULEV standards requires a further reduction of HC (NMHC) emissions by 84% and NOx by 60% compared with the emission performance Tier 2 Bin 5 compliant catalyst system. Consequently high conversion performance for both HCs and NOx is needed. An investigation of HC emission behavior under the FTP75 mode showed that a reduction of cold-phase HCs was critical for meeting the standard. Large quantities of HCs above C4 are emitted in the cold state.
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