Refine Your Search

Topic

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 20 of 20
Technical Paper

Effects of Gas Flow and Mixture Properties on Engine-Out HC Emissions

1996-10-01
961952
The geometry and area of the notch in the swirl control valve installed in the intake port were varied to analyze the effects on HC emissions. A swirl control valve functions to promote the formation of a homogeneous mixture, enabling the amount of liquid fuel supplied to the cylinder to be reduced. For this reason, it is difficult to obtain an added effect through the combined use of a swirl control valve and an auxiliary-air type of injector for assisting fuel atomization. Tumble (vertical swirl) flow fields are effective in shortening the combustion period. This results in a higher exhaust gas temperature at an equivalent level of combustion stability. It was thought that swirl flow fields produce residual gas flow in the cylinder after the completion of the main combustion period. It is surmised that the residual gas flow functions to diffuse and promote after-burning of the unburned HC layer.
Technical Paper

A Comparison of Gas Chromatography-Based Methods of Analyzing Hydrocarbon Species

1994-03-01
940740
Gas chromatographic methods for analyzing hydrocarbon species in vehicle exhaust emissions were compared in terms of their collection efficiency, detection limit, repeatability and number of species detected using cylinder gas and tailpipe emission samples. The main methods compared were a Tenax cold trap injection (TCT) method (C5-C12 HCs) and a cold trap injection (CTI) method (C2-C4 HCs; C5-C12 HCs). Our own direct (DIR) method was used to confirm the collection efficiencies. Both methods yielded good results, but the CTI method showed low collection efficiency for some C2-C4 HCs. Measurement of individual species is needed with this method for accurate analysis of tailpipe emissions. Both the CTI method and the TCT method combined with the DIR method for determining C2-C4 HCs yielded nearly the same ozone specific reactivity values for the NMHC species analyzed.
Technical Paper

Improvement in Pitting Resistance of Transmission Gears by Plasma Carburizing Process

1994-03-01
940727
The application of both high strength gear steels and shot peening technology has succeeded in strengthening automotive transmission gears. This technology, though, improves mainly the fatigue strength at the tooth root, but not the pitting property at the tooth face. Therefore, demand has moved to the development of new gear steels with good pitting resistance. In order to improve pitting resistance, the authors studied super carburizing which is characterized by carbide dispersion in the case, especially processed with a plasma carburizing furnace. Firstly, the influence of the carburizing temperature and carburizing period on the carbide morphology was investigated and the optimum carburizing conditions were determined. Secondly, the fatigue strength and pitting resistance was evaluated using carbide dispersed specimens.
Technical Paper

Development of Improved Metal-Supported Catalyst

1989-02-01
890188
A compact, high-performance and durable metal-supported catalyst has been developed by using the properties of the metal support effectively. The advantages of the metal-surpported catalyst against the ceramic-supported one are higher geometrical surface area, higher heat conductivity and thinner wall thickness. Higher geometlical surface area and higher heat conductivity lead to higher conversion efficiency after durability test and it allows reduction in catalyst volume. And the thinner wall thickness lowers gas flow resistance. But also, the metal-supported catalyst has the disadvantage of larger heat expansion and it requires special structure and material.
Technical Paper

Reduction of Wall Thickness of Ceramic Substrates for Automotive Catalysts

1990-02-01
900614
Ceramic honeycombs have been used as automotive catalyst supports in US, Japan, Europe and other highly urbanized countries. Now, engine output is a great concern for automanufacturers, and reduction of the wall thickness of honeycomb substrates became indespensable for maintenance of gas flow restriction to a certain low level. To reduce wall thickness, material should be strong to maintain canning strength of substrates. Mechanical strength was improved with high density cordierite. However, isostatic strength of whole substrates was still insufficient with reduced thin walls for canning in spite of the material's high mecanical strength. Discussion is carried out on further possibility of improving canning performance of thin wall substrates as well as flow restriction, and warm up characteristics.
Technical Paper

Reduction in Exhaust Noise Through Exhaust Valving Modifications Achieved with a Gas Dynamics Simulation Model

1991-02-01
910617
One of advanced requirements in current high output power engine design, as is seen in a four valve engine, is to reduce the exhaust noise without a reduction in engine performance. In order to examine the relationship between output and exhaust noise level, a gas dynamics simulation model was extended so as to predict the exhaust generated noise. The gas dynamics model used in this study is developed based on a finite difference method in which unsteady compressible flow is solved by two-step Lax-Wendroff method. Using this simulation model, timing changes were found to be effective in reducing the exhaust noise level without showing any trade-off on engine performance. These results were validated by the experiment.
Technical Paper

A Portable Fast Response Air-Fuel Ratio Meter Using an Extended Range Oxygen Sensor

1988-02-01
880559
The method for measuring air-fuel ratio is generally based on analysis of the exhaust gas components and its calculations. A new instrument has been developed which uses this method, but it attaches an oxygen sensor for exhaust gas analysis to the exhaust pipe and calculates the air-fuel ratio directly from the sensor output using a microprocessor. The response time of this instrument is 100 milliseconds and because it does not require an exhaust gas sampling system its weight is only 2.5 kg. This paper describes the operation theory, construction and characteristics of this instrument, as well as the results of air-fuel ratio of measurements on engines and vehicles using this instrument in a transient state.
Technical Paper

Small Engine - Concept Emission Vehicles

1971-02-01
710296
Three Japanese automobile manufacturers-Mitsubishi Motors Corp., Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., and Toyo Kogyo Co., Ltd.-have been making efforts over the past three years to design and develop effective thermal reactor-exhaust gas recirculation and catalytic converter systems suitable for small engines. The work is being done by members participating in the IIEC (Inter-Industry Emission Control) Program, and the exhaust emission levels of the concept vehicles developed by these companies have met the goal established by the IIEC Program at low mileage. Each system, however, has a characteristic relationship between exhaust emission level and loss of fuel economy. Much investigation is required, particularly with respect to durability, before any system that will fully satisfy all service requirements can be completed. This paper reports the progress of research and development of the individual concept vehicles.
Technical Paper

Nissan Oil Econometer Permits the Measurement of Engine Oil Consumption

1981-06-01
810754
A technique has been developed which permits the determination of engine oil consumption on an instantaneous basis. The procedure uses the sulfur in the oil as a tracer. The concentration of sulfur compounds in the exhaust gas is determined using a Flame Photometric Detector (FPD). Special modifications of the FPD reduce the interference of other gases and improve the accuracy of the instrument. Although the unit is operationally simple, its abilities to measure continuously and respond quickly allow it to surpass conventional methods for measurement of oil consumption.
Technical Paper

Measurement of Piston and Piston Ring Assembly Friction Force

1985-10-01
851671
A new method for measuring friction has been developed in order to analyze piston and piston ring assembly friction force during engine operation. While this method does not require extensive modification to the piston or cylinder, two extra compression and expansion strokes each are added at the end of the conventional four-stroke cycle. In these measuring strokes, the gas pressure and temperature are maintained at firing levels, and friction force characteristics of the piston and piston ring assembly are measured continuously while the burned gas is compressed and expanded.
Technical Paper

Exhaust Noise Abatement with Porous Sintered Metal Silencer

1985-02-01
850326
The exhaust system is often one of the main sources of vehicle noise. A new type of exhaust silencer made of porous sintered aluminum and installed at the end of the exhaust tube considerably reduces this noise, with no rise in back pressure. The mechanism of noise abatement is analyzed utilizing fluid dynamic analysis techniques. It is concluded that noise reduction results mainly from the fluid dynamic effects arising from the gas permeability of the material. Among these effects are the boundary layer control effect of the inner flow, flattening of the velocity profile, heat dispersion effect, decrease in turbulence of flow, smoothing of exhaust pulsation, contraction of the mixing region, and the resulting large decrease in the volume of the noise source. In regard to acoustical effect, the sintered metal can be thought of as Helmholtz resonators. The change in the end condition as an acoustic tube also reduces the peak level of acoustic resonance.
Technical Paper

Crank-angle-resolved Measurements of Air-fuel Ratio, Temperature, and Liquid Fuel Droplet Scattering in a Direct-injection Gasoline Engine

2010-10-25
2010-01-2246
Simultaneous crank-angle-resolved measurements of gasoline vapor concentration, gas temperature, and liquid fuel droplet scattering were made with three-color infrared absorption in a direct-injection spark-ignition engine with premium gasoline. The infrared light was coupled into and out of the cylinder using fiber optics incorporated into a modified spark plug, allowing measurement at a location adjacent to the spark plug electrode. Two mid-infrared (mid-IR) laser wavelengths were simultaneously produced by difference-frequency-generation in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) using one signal and two pump lasers operating in the near-infrared (near-IR). A portion of the near-IR signal laser residual provided a simultaneous third, non-resonant, wavelength for liquid droplet detection. This non-resonant signal was used to subtract the influence of droplet scattering from the resonant mid-IR signals to obtain vapor absorption signals in the presence of droplet extinction.
Technical Paper

Fundamental Analysis of Combustion Initiation Characteristics of Low Temperature Plasma Ignition for Internal Combustion Gasoline Engine

2011-04-12
2011-01-0660
In recent years, the study of volumetric ignition using high-speed (nanosecond) pulsed low temperature plasma for gasoline engines was reported by authors [ 1 ]. However, the fundamental analysis of ignition characteristics of the low temperature plasma ignition and the analysis of combustion initiation mechanism of the low temperature plasma ignition was not enough in the previous paper. In this study, a low temperature plasma igniter of a barrier discharge (silent discharge) model was developed for trial purpose. A fundamental analysis of ignition characteristics was carried out when the low temperature plasma ignition was applied as the ignition system for gasoline engine using single-cylinder. The difference between the ignition characteristics of the low temperature plasma and the thermal plasma of a conventional spark plug was investigated by comparing a combustion characteristic of both in various driving conditions.
Technical Paper

In-line Hydrocarbon (HC) Adsorber System for Reducing Cold-Start Emissions

2000-03-06
2000-01-0892
An adsorber system for reducing cold-start hydrocarbon (HC) emissions has been developed combining existing catalyst technologies with a zeolite-based HC adsorber. The series flow in-line concept offers a passive and simplified alternative to other technologies by incorporating one additional adsorber substrate into existing converters without any additional valving, purging lines, secondary air, or special substrates. Major technical issues to be resolved for practical use of this system are 1) the ability to adsorb a wide range of HC molecular sizes in the cold exhaust gas and 2) the temperature difference between HC desorption from the adsorber and activation of the catalyst to convert desorbed HCs. This paper describes the current development status of hydrocarbon adsorber aftertreatment technologies. We report results obtained with a variety of adsorber properties, washcoat structures of adsorber catalyst and start-up and underfloor catalyst system combinations.
Technical Paper

Simultaneous Measurement of In-Cylinder Temperature and Residual Gas Concentration in the Vicinity of the Spark Plug by Wavelength Modulation Infrared Absorption

2007-04-16
2007-01-0639
This paper presents a new measurement technique for in-cylinder gas temperature and residual gas concentration during the compression stroke of an internal combustion (IC) engine. This technique is based on the infrared absorption of water vapor by a wavelength modulated laser. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection (WMS-2f) was adopted to enable the short-path measurements over a wide range of temperatures and pressures corresponding to the late compression stroke in a typical automotive engine. The WMS-2f signal is detected through a bandpass filter at a width of 7.5 kHz, enabling crank angle-resolved measurements. The temperature is determined from the ratio of optical absorption for two overtone transitions of water vapor in the intake gas mixture, and the H2O concentration is determined from this inferred temperature and the absorption for one of the transitions.
Technical Paper

A Study of an Analysis Method for Trace Substances in Vehicle Exhaust Gas

2007-04-16
2007-01-0306
A new method for measuring unregulated substances in the exhaust gas is being investigated to clarify the influence of the vehicles' exhaust emissions into the environment. This paper explains our work on developing an analysis method for detecting and quantifying trace substances in the exhaust gas. A new analysis method was examined that uses thermal desorption to analyze trace amounts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in vehicle exhaust gas. This technique is faster than conventional methods and does not require any preconditioning of the samples before analysis. While lead and chloromethane were detected in the exhaust gas samples, it was made clear that these substances did not originate in the engine system. Accordingly, the results of this study indicate that careful attention must be paid to the test environment and the presence of measurement interfering substances in exhaust samples when measuring trace constituents in the exhaust gas from low-emission vehicles.
Technical Paper

Uniform Quenching Technology by Using Controlled High Pressure Gas after Low Pressure Carburizing

2008-04-14
2008-01-0365
To reduce quenching distortion, step gas quenching has been proposed in recent years, which refers to rapid gas cooling of steel from austenitizing temperature to a point above or below Ms temperature, where it is held for a specific period of time, followed by gas cooling. In this study, by using infrared thermography combined with conventional thermocouple, a new temperature monitoring and control system was developed to realize the step gas quenching process of a hypoid ring gear after low pressure carburizing. The test production results indicate that by using the new monitoring and control system, we can control the gas quenching process and the distortion of carburized gear treated by step gas quenching can be reduced significantly compared with standard gas quenching.
Technical Paper

Numerical Analysis of the Exhaust Gas Flow and Heat Transfer in a Close-Coupled Catalytic Converter System During Warm-Up

2001-03-05
2001-01-0943
A new multidimensional calculation method has been developed to simulate the warm-up characteristics of close-coupled catalytic converter systems. First, a one-dimensional gas exchange simulation and a three-dimensional exhaust gas flow calculation are combined to simulate the pulsation gas flow caused by the gas exchange process. The gas flow calculation and a heat transfer calculation are then combined to simulate heat transfer in the exhaust manifold and the catalyst honeycomb under pulsation flow. The predicted warm-up characteristics of the systems examined agreed well with the experimental data. In this simulation, CPU time was reduced greatly through the use of new calculation methods. Finally, the warm-up process of close-coupled catalysts is analyzed in detail with this simulation method. The design requirements for improving warm-up characteristics have been made clear.
Technical Paper

Development of Thinnest Wall Catalyst Substrate

2002-03-04
2002-01-0358
The thinnest wall thickness of automotive catalyst substrates has previously been 30 μm for metal substrates and 50 μm for ceramic substrates. This paper describes a newly developed catalyst substrate that is the world's first to achieve 20-μm-thick cell walls. This catalyst substrate features low thermal capacity and low pressure loss. Generally, a thinner cell wall decreases substrate strength and heat shock resistance. However, the development of a “diffused junction method”, replacing the previous “wax bonding method”, and a small waved foil has overcome these problems. This diffused junction method made it possible to strengthen the contact points between the inner waved foil and the rolled foil compared with previous substrates. It was also found that heat shock resistance at high temperature can be much improved by applying a slight wave to the foil instead of using a plane foil.
Journal Article

Study of an On-board Fuel Reformer and Hydrogen-Added EGR Combustion in a Gasoline Engine

2015-04-14
2015-01-0902
To improve the fuel economy via high EGR, combustion stability is enhanced through the addition of hydrogen, with its high flame-speed in air-fuel mixture. So, in order to realize on-board hydrogen production we developed a fuel reformer which produces hydrogen rich gas. One of the main issues of the reformer engine is the effects of reformate gas components on combustion performance. To clarify the effect of reformate gas contents on combustion stability, chemical kinetic simulations and single-cylinder engine test, in which hydrogen, CO, methane and simulated gas were added to intake air, were executed. And it is confirmed that hydrogen additive rate is dominant on high EGR combustion. The other issue to realize the fuel reformer was the catalyst deterioration. Catalyst reforming and exposure test were carried out to understand the influence of actual exhaust gas on the catalyst performance.
X