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Technical Paper

Simulation Study on the Effect of Introducing Low-Emission Vehicles on Air Quality Improvement

1996-05-01
961209
The effect of the introduction of low-emission vehicles on potential air quality improvement in the Los Angeles area was predicted using a three-dimensional airshed simulation model. The simulations were based on ozone concentration estimates made on the basis of data released by the California Air Resources Board concerning projected quantities of emissions from various sources in 2010. Analyses were made of three scenarios. One assumed that LEV, ULEV and ZEV regulations were enforced as planned, a second assumed that these planned regulations were modified; and a third assumed that emission levels from various sources were reduced in line with the goals of the Air Quality Management Plan formulated by the South Coast Air Quality Management District.
Technical Paper

Development of a Valve Train Wear Test Procedure for Gasoline Engine Oil

1994-03-01
940794
An analysis was made of wear factors by investigating the effect of engine operating conditions on valve train wear. It was found that cam nose wear increased as larger amounts of combustion products, including nitrogen oxides and unburned gasoline, became intermixed with the engine oil. Based on these results, a valve train wear test procedure has been developed for evaluating cam nose and rocker arm wear under engine firing conditions. It has been confirmed that this test procedure correlates will with ASTM Sequence VE test and CCMC TU-3 test.
Technical Paper

Effects of NOx and Unburned Gasoline on Low Temperature Sludge Formation in Engine Oil

1991-02-01
910747
It is generally known that NOx reacts with unburned gasoline, olefins in particular, to form sludge precursors. In this study, the authors investigated the process by which NOx and unburned gasoline mix into the engine oil and analyzed the mechanism whereby stop and go driving accelerates sludge formation. It has been found that NOx detected in the engine oil as nitrite ions mixes into the oil in the crankcase. The NOx concentration in the engine oil increases rapidly when the crankcase gas temperature is nearly equal to the dew point of the water vapor in the crankcase. Unburned gasoline is mainly absorbed into the oil through the oil film on the cylinder walls and the oil in the ring grooves. During low-temperature engine operation in stop-go driving (i.e., when the vehicle is stopped), NOx and unburned gasoline are absorbed into the engine oil and, in high-temperature engine operation (i.e., when the vehicle is moving), NOx and unburned gasoline are released from the oil.
Technical Paper

Potentiality of the Modification of Engine Combustion Rate for NOx Formation Control in the Premixed SI Engine

1975-02-01
750353
In order to study the potentiality of the modification of the combustion rate for NOx formation control in the spark ignition (SI) engine, the authors first developed a new mathematical model by assuming the stepped gas temperature gradient in the cylinder. The predicted results from this new mathematical model show good coincidence with the experimental data. Second, the authors discuss the effects of the modification of the combustion rate on NOx formation using the new mathematical model. It was concluded that NOx formation in the premixed SI engine would be essentially determined by the specific fuel consumption only, regardless of any modification of the engine combustion rate.
Technical Paper

Heat Capacity Changes Predict Nitrogen Oxides Reduction by Exhaust Gas Recirculation

1971-02-01
710010
Earlier work has demonstrated that exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) decreases peak combustion temperature and thus reduces the concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in spark ignition engine exhaust. The present authors hypothesized that NOx formation is primarily affected by the heat capacity of the combustion gases and recycled exhaust. The hypothesis was tested in an experimental program involving the admission of inert gases such as He, Ar, H2, and CO2, and water in place of EGR. In addition to confirming the validity of the original hypothesis, the test data also indicated that engine output and efficiency were significantly affected by the heat capacity of the combustion gases. The authors conclude that EGR functions by increasing the heat capacity of the working fluid, and demonstrates that the correlative changes in NOx and engine performance can be predicted from heat capacity considerations.
Technical Paper

Ignition, Combustion, and Exhaust Emissions of Lean Mixtures in Automotive Spark Ignition Engines

1971-02-01
710159
Misfire and cycle-to-cycle combustion variation are both serious problems in securing good engine performance and low exhaust emissions in the case of using extremely lean mixtures. Making some modifications in the ignition system and in the combustion chamber, and increasing the mixture turbulence, we examined their effects upon the lean limit, the engine performance, and the exhaust emissions. It was found that gap width and gap projection of a spark plug and spark energy as well as mixture turbulence had a great effect on extending the lean limit and improving engine performance with lean mixtures. A compact combustion chamber is preferable for lean mixture operation. Smooth operation of the engine can be maintained even at retarded spark timing by applying the above-mentioned items and providing hot intake air to the engine. Consequently, exhaust emissions, including hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen, can be substantially reduced.
Technical Paper

Potentiality of Small DI Diesel Engines Under Consideration of Emissions and Noise Control

1985-06-01
851213
The potentiality of direct injection (DI) diesel engines for passenger cars has been examined by comparing the characteristics of fuel consumption, exhaust emissions and noize levels between a turbocharged DI diesel engine and a turbocharged IDI diesel engine with the same displacement, 4 cylinders and 2 liters. It was observed that improved fuel consumption was obtained as the engine load increased, namely, 10 - 15% in the higher load range and 5 - 10% in the partial load range. In comparison to the IDI engine, the exhaust emissions of the DI engine tended to contain two or three times higher NOx and HC, and also about 30% higher particulates. Further, the noise levels of the DI engine were approximately 2 - 4 dB (A) higher than those of the IDI engine.
Technical Paper

Impact Study of High Biodiesel Blends on Exhaust Emissions to Advanced Aftertreatment Systems

2010-04-12
2010-01-1292
In Biodiesel Fuel Research Working Group(WG) of Japan Auto-Oil Program(JATOP), some impacts of high biodiesel blends have been investigated from the viewpoints of fuel properties, stability, emissions, exhaust aftertreatment systems, cold driveability, mixing in engine oils, durability/reliability and so on. In the impact on exhaust emissions, the impact of high biodiesel blends into diesel fuel on diesel emissions was evaluated. The wide variety of biodiesel blendstock, which included not only some kinds of fatty acid methyl esters(FAME) but also hydrofined biodiesel(HBD) and Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel(FTD), were selected to evaluate. The main blend level evaluated was 5, 10 and 20% and the higher blend level over 20% was also evaluated in some tests. The main advanced technologies for exhaust aftertreatment systems were diesel particulate filter(DPF), Urea selective catalytic reduction (Urea-SCR) and the combination of DPF and NOx storage reduction catalyst(NSR).
Technical Paper

Impact of Oil-derived Sulfur and Phosphorus on Diesel NOx Storage Reduction Catalyst - JCAP II Oil WG Report

2006-10-16
2006-01-3312
Emission regulations for diesel-powered vehicles have been gradually tightening. Installation of after-treatment devices such as diesel particulate filters (DPF), NOx storage reduction (NSR) catalysts, and so on is indispensable to satisfy rigorous limits of particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Japan Clean Air Program II Oil Working Group (JCAPII Oil WG) has been investigating the effect of engine oil on advanced diesel after-treatment devices. First of all, we researched the impact of oil-derived ash on continuous regeneration-type diesel particulate filter (CR-DPF), and already reported that the less sulfated ash in oil gave rise to lower pressure drop across CR-DPF [1]. In this paper, impact of oil-derived sulfur and phosphorus on NSR catalyst was investigated using a 4L direct injection common-rail diesel engine with turbo-intercooler. This engine equipped with NSR catalyst meets the Japanese new short-term emission regulations.
Technical Paper

Summary report of Japan Clean Air Program diesel and diesel fuel activities

2007-07-23
2007-01-1952
Diesel emissions are significant issue worldwide, and emissions requirements have become so tough that. the application of after-treatment systems is now indispensable in many countries To meet even more stringent future emissions requirements, it has become apparent that the improvement of market fuel quality is essential as well as the development in engine and exhaust after-treatment technology. Japan Clean Air Program II (JCAP II) is being conducted to assess the direction of future technologies through the evaluation of current automobile and fuel technologies and consequently to realize near zero emissions and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction. In this program, effects of fuel properties on the performance of diesel engines and a vehicle equipped with two types of diesel NOx emission after-treatment devices, a Urea-SCR system and a NOx storage reduction (NSR) catalyst system, were examined.
Technical Paper

Nissan's Gasoline SULEV Technology

2000-04-02
2000-01-1583
A new gasoline-fueled Super Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (SULEV) technology has been developed that meets the California Air Resources Board's (CARB) most stringent tailpipe emission levels and zero evaporative emissions, while fulfilling all On-Board Diagnostic II (OBD II) requirements. This paper will describe the various new technologies used in achieving the SULEV standards, such as the HC trap system with an ultra-thin wall substrate for the improvement of catalyst light-off time, and an electrically actuated swirl control valve for reducing cold-start emissions. In addition, a control approach to stabilizing NOx emissions will also be discussed.
Technical Paper

Effects of Fuel Properties on the Performance of Advanced Diesel NOx Aftertreatment Devices

2006-10-16
2006-01-3443
In the Japan Clean Air Program II (JCAP II) Diesel WG, effects of fuel properties on the performance of two types of diesel NOx emission aftertreatment devices, a Urea-SCR system and a NOx storage reduction (NSR) catalyst system, were examined. For a Urea-SCR system, the NOx emission reduction performance with and without an oxidation catalyst installed in front of the SCR catalyst at low exhaust gas temperature operation was compared. For an NSR catalyst system, the effect of fuel sulfur on both emissions and fuel economy during 50,000 km driving was examined. Furthermore, effects of other fuel properties such as distillation on exhaust emissions were investigated. The results show that sulfur is the influential factor for both devices. Namely, high NOx emission reduction performance of the Urea-SCR system with the oxidation catalyst at low exhaust gas temperature operation is influenced by sulfur.
Technical Paper

Investigations of Compatibility of ETBE Gasoline with Current Gasoline Vehicles

2006-10-16
2006-01-3381
Clarifying the impact of ETBE 8% blended fuel on current Japanese gasoline vehicles, under the Japan Clean Air Program II (JCAPII) we conducted exhaust emission tests, evaporative emission tests, durability tests on the exhaust after-treatment system, cold starting tests, and material immersion tests. ETBE 17% blended fuel was also investigated as a reference. The regulated exhaust emissions (CO, HC, and NOx) didn't increase with any increase of ETBE content in the fuel. In durability tests, no noticeable increase of exhaust emission after 40,000km was observed. In evaporative emissions tests, HSL (Hot Soak Loss) and DBL (Diurnal Breathing Loss) didn't increase. In cold starting tests, duration of cranking using ETBE 8% fuel was similar to that of ETBE 0%. In the material immersion tests, no influence of ETBE on these material properties was observed.
Technical Paper

Ultra-Clean Combustion Technology Combining a Low-Temperature and Premixed Combustion Concept for Meeting Future Emission Standards

2001-03-05
2001-01-0200
Experimental investigations were conducted with a direct-injection diesel engine to improve exhaust emission, especially nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM), without increasing fuel consumption. As a result of this work, a new combustion concept, called Modulated Kinetics (MK) combustion, has been developed that reduces NOx and smoke simultaneously through low-temperature combustion and premixed combustion, respectively. The characteristics of a new combustion concept were investigated using a single cylinder DI diesel engine and combustion photographs. The low compression ratio, EGR cooling and high injection pressure was applied with a multi-cylinder test engine to accomplish premixed combustion at high load region. Combustion chamber specifications have been optimized to avoid the increase of cold-start HC emissions due to a low compression ratio.
Technical Paper

Emission Reduction Technologies Adopted for Japan U-LEV Certified Vehicles

2003-05-19
2003-01-1872
This paper describes the emission reduction technologies applied to 4- and 6-cylinder engines used on Japanese market models certified as ultra-low emission vehicles (U-LEVs) in Japan. To qualify for this rigorous U-LEV certification, a vehicle must reduce hydrocarbon (HC) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions by an additional 75% from the levels mandated by Japan's 2000 exhaust emission regulations. Nearly all Nissan Japanese models fitted with a gasoline engine, ranging from in-line 4-cylinder engines to V6 engines, have now been certified as U-LEVs. This has been accomplished by further improving the emission reduction technologies that were developed for the Sentra CA, which was launched in the U.S. market in 2000 as the world's first gasoline-fueled vehicle to qualify for Partial Zero Emission Vehicle (P-ZEV) credits from the California Air Resources Board. The specific new technologies involved are as follows.
Technical Paper

Combination of Combustion Concept and Fuel Property for Ultra-Clean DI Diesel

2004-06-08
2004-01-1868
Experimental investigations were previously conducted with a direct-injection diesel engine with the aim of reducing exhaust emissions, especially nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). As a result of that work, a combustion concept, called Modulated Kinetics (MK) combustion, was developed that reduces NOx and smoke simultaneously through low-temperature combustion and premixed combustion to achieve a cleaner diesel engine. In subsequent work, it was found that applying a low compression ratio was effective in expanding the MK combustion region on the high-load side. The MK concept was then combined with an exhaust after-treatment system and applied to a test vehicle. The results indicated the attainment of ULEV emission levels, albeit in laboratory evaluations. In the present work, the combination of the MK combustion concept and certain fuel properties has been experimentally investigated with the aim of reducing exhaust emissions further.
Technical Paper

Development of Third Generation of Gasoline P-ZEV Technology

2003-03-03
2003-01-0816
This paper describes the third generation of the partial zero emission vehicle (P-ZEV) technology originally adopted on the Nissan Sentra CA sold in California. The 2000 Nissan Sentra CA became the world's first gasoline-fueled car to qualify for P-ZEV credits from the California Air Resources Board (CARB). The third-generation P-ZEV system has been substantially reduced in size and cost, compared with the Sentra CA system, enabling it to be used on high-volume models. This system complies with the P-ZEV requirements, including those for zero evaporative emissions and Onboard Diagnostics II (OBD-II). To achieve a more compact and lower-cost system, an ultra-thin-walled catalyst substrate, the world's first to attain a 1.8-mil wall thickness, has been adopted along with catalysts that display excellent low-temperature activity. As a result, low-temperature catalyst activity has been significantly improved.
Journal Article

Development of a Diesel Emission Catalyst System for Meeting US SULEV Standards

2008-04-14
2008-01-0449
In recent years, catalyst systems such as a lean NOx trap (LNT) catalyst system and a urea selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system have been developed to obtain cleaner diesel emissions. At Nissan, we developed an emission control system for meeting Tier 2 Bin 5 requirements in 2003. On the basis of that technology, a new HC-NOx trap catalyst system has now been developed that complies with the SULEV standards without increasing the catalyst volume and precious metal loading. Compliance with the SULEV standards requires a further reduction of HC (NMHC) emissions by 84% and NOx by 60% compared with the emission performance Tier 2 Bin 5 compliant catalyst system. Consequently high conversion performance for both HCs and NOx is needed. An investigation of HC emission behavior under the FTP75 mode showed that a reduction of cold-phase HCs was critical for meeting the standard. Large quantities of HCs above C4 are emitted in the cold state.
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