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Technical Paper

Mission-based Design Space Exploration for Powertrain Electrification of Series Plugin Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck

2018-04-03
2018-01-1027
Hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) are essential for reducing fuel consumption and emissions. However, when analyzing different segments of the transportation industry, for example, public transportation or different sizes of delivery trucks and how the HEV are used, it is clear that one powertrain may not be optimal in all situations. Choosing a hybrid powertrain architecture and proper component sizes for different applications is an important task to find the optimal trade-off between fuel economy, drivability, and vehicle cost. However, exploring and evaluating all possible architectures and component sizes is a time-consuming task. A search algorithm, using Gaussian Processes, is proposed that simultaneously explores multiple architecture options, to identify the Pareto-optimal solutions.
Technical Paper

Robust Path Tracking Control for Autonomous Heavy Vehicles

2018-04-03
2018-01-1082
With high maneuverability and heavy-duty load capacity, articulated steer vehicles (ASV) are widely used in construction, forestry and mining sectors. However, the steering process of ASV is much different from wheeled steer vehicles and tractor-trailer vehicles. Unsuitable steering control in path following could easily give rise to the “snaking” behaviour, which greatly reduces the safety and stability of ASV. In order to achieve precise control for ASV, a novel path tracking control method is proposed by virtual terrain field (VTF) method. A virtual U-shaped terrain field is assumed to exist along the reference path. The virtual terrain altitude depends on the lateral error, heading error, preview distance and road curvature. If the vehicle deviates from the reference line, it will be pulled back to the lowest position under the influence of additional lateral tire forces which are caused by the virtual banked road.
Technical Paper

Application of Scaled Deflection Injury Criteria to Two Small, Fragile Females in Side Impact Motor Vehicle Crashes

2018-04-03
2018-01-0542
Thoracic injury criteria have been previously developed to predict thoracic injury for vehicle occupants as a function of biomechanical response. Historically, biomechanical testing of post-mortem human surrogates (PMHS) for injury criteria development has primarily been focused on mid-sized males. Response targets and injury criteria for other demographics, including small females, have been determined by scaling values from mid-sized males. The objective of this study was to explore the applicability of scaled injury criteria to their representative population. Two PMHS were subjected to a side-impact loading condition which replicates a near-side, MDB-to-vehicle impact for the driver. This was accomplished using the Advanced Side Impact System, or ASIS, on a HYGE sled. The sled acceleration matched the acceleration profile of an impacted vehicle, while the four pneumatic cylinders of the ASIS produced realistic door intrusion.
Technical Paper

Kinematics Response of the PMHS Brain to Rotational Loading of the Head: Development of Experimental Methods and Analysis of Preliminary Data

2018-04-03
2018-01-0547
Experimentally derived brain response envelopes are needed to evaluate and validate existing finite element (FE) head models. Motion of the brain relative to the skull during rotational input was measured using high-speed biplane x-ray. To generate repeatable, reproducible, and scalable data, methods were developed to reduce experimental variance. An “extreme-energy” device was developed to provide a controlled input that is unaffected by specimen characteristics. Additionally, a stereotactic frame was used to deploy radiopaque markers at specific, pre-determined locations within the brain. One post-mortem human surrogate (PMHS) head specimen was subjected to repeat tests of a half-sine rotational speed pulse in the sagittal plane. The desired pulse had a peak angular speed of 40 rad/s and duration of 30 ms. Relative motion of the brain was quantified using radiopaque targets and high-speed biplane x-ray. Frontal and occipital intracranial pressure (ICP) were also measured.
Technical Paper

Accuracy Assessment of Three-Dimensional Vehicle Edge Features Generated with Aid of Photogrammetric Epipolar Lines

2018-04-03
2018-01-0530
Photogrammetry is widely used in the automotive and accident reconstruction communities to extract three-dimensional information from photographs. Prior studies in the literature have demonstrated the accuracy of such methods when photographs contain easily-identifiable, distinct points; however, it is often desirable to determine measurements for locations where a seam, edge, or contour line is available. To exploit such details, an analyst can control the direction that the epipolar line is projected onto the camera plane by strategic selection of photographs. This process constrains the search for the corresponding 3D point to a straight line that can be projected perpendicular to the seam, edge, or contour line. Thus, the goal of this study was to evaluate the modeling accuracy for cases in which an analyst uses epipolar lines in a workflow.
Technical Paper

Multiple Rear-end Collisions in Freeway Traffic, Their Causes and Their Avoidance

1970-02-01
700085
The sensitivity factor, λ, of stimulus-response car following equations was computed, based on response times, τ, obtained from aerial survey data. Vehicles of a platoon are investigated as they approach, proceed through, and leave behind a kinematic disturbance, and an inherent local and asymptotic instability is discovered. Aerial survey data is used in a numerical example to demonstrate how multiple rear-end collisions can be triggered by one vehicle. A driver aid system, informing drivers about the differential velocity between lead and following vehicles, could improve stability, although the final answer appears to lie in automated or semi-automated longitudinal control systems.
Technical Paper

The Highway Research Laboratory of Ohio's Transportation Research Center

1970-02-01
700524
This paper presents some of the technical considerations that underlie the development of the master plan and the establishment of design specifications for Ohio's Highway Research Laboratory. It describes the overall features of the master plan and discusses some of the critical design features as these relate to the various tracks and other field facilities. The development of the master plan was guided by a study of the layout of existing proving grounds and by the experience gained over the years in their operations. It was guided furthermore by a set of principles relating to operational considerations, considerations of flexibility in the layout, land utilization, safety, capacity, and cost. Finally, it was guided by an indication of future research and development needs as expressed by researchers and potential sponsors in both government and industry.
Technical Paper

Plant Modeling and Software Verification for a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle in the EcoCAR 2 Competition

2015-04-14
2015-01-1229
The EcoCAR 2: Plugging into the Future team at The Ohio State University is designing a Parallel-Series Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle capable of 44 miles of all-electric range. The vehicle features an 18.9-kWh lithium-ion battery pack with range extending operation in both series and parallel modes. This is made possible by a 1.8-L ethanol (E85) engine and 6-speed automated manual transmission. This vehicle is designed to drastically reduce fuel consumption, with a utility factor weighted fuel economy of 50 miles per gallon gasoline equivalent (mpgge), while meeting Tier II Bin 5 emissions standards. This paper details three years of modeling and simulation development for the OSU EcoCAR 2 vehicle. Included in this paper are the processes for developing simulation platform and model requirements, plant model and soft ECU development, test development and validation, automated regression testing, and controls and calibration optimization.
Technical Paper

Comparison of Intermediate-Combustion Products Formed in Engine with and without Ignition

1955-01-01
550262
RESULTS of tests performed on a modified type F-4 CFR engine show that precombustion reactions in both the fired and motored engine gave the same carbonyl products. The maximum specific yields of these carbonyls were similar for a given fuel compressed with comparable pressure-time-temperature histories in both motored- and fired-engine tests. As the motored engine seems to duplicate precombustion reactions occurring in a fired engine under normal operating conditions, the authors of this paper conclude that the motored engine, offering ease of control and sampling, is a convenient and valid tool for combustion research.
Technical Paper

Flight Investigation of Natural Laminar Flow on the Bellanca Skyrocket II

1983-02-01
830717
Two major concerns have inhibited the use of natural laminar flow (NLF) for viscous drag reduction on production aircraft. These are the concerns of achieveability of NLF on practical airframe surfaces, and maintainability in operating environments. Previous research in this area left a mixture of positive and negative conclusions regarding these concerns. While early (pre-1950) airframe construction methods could not achieve NLF criteria for waviness, several modern construction methods (composites for example) can achieve the required smoothness. This paper presents flight experiment data on the achieveability and maintainability of NLF on a high-performance, single-propeller, composite airplane, the Bellanca Skyrocket II. The significant contribution of laminar flow to the performance of this airplane was measured. Observations of laminar flow in the propeller slipstream are discussed, as are the effects of insect contamination on the wing.
Technical Paper

Effect of Traffic, Road and Weather Information on PHEV Energy Management

2011-09-11
2011-24-0162
Energy management plays a key role in achieving higher fuel economy for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) technology; the state of charge (SOC) profile of the battery during the entire driving trip determines the electric energy usage, thus determining the fuel consumed. The energy management algorithm should be designed to meet all driving scenarios while achieving the best possible fuel economy. The knowledge of the power requirement during a driving trip is necessary to achieve the best fuel economy results; performance of the energy management algorithm is closely related to the amount of information available in the form of road grade, velocity profiles, trip distance, weather characteristics and other exogenous factors. Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) allow vehicles to communicate with one another and the infrastructure to collect data about surrounding, and forecast the expected events, e.g., traffic condition, turns, road grade, and weather forecast.
Technical Paper

Model-Based Analysis and Optimization of Turbocharged Diesel Engines with a Variable Geometry Compressor and Turbine System

2012-04-16
2012-01-0716
In the last few years, the application of downsizing and turbocharging to internal combustion engines has considerably increased due to the proven potential of this technology to increase engine efficiency. Variable geometry turbines have been largely adopted to optimize the exhaust energy recovery over a large operating range. Two-stage turbocharger systems have also been studied as a solution to improve engine low-end torque and efficiency, with the first units currently available on the market. However, the compressor technology is today still based on fixed geometry machines, which are sized to efficiently operate at the maximum air flow and therefore lead to poor efficiency values at low air flow conditions. Furthermore, the surge limits prevents the full capabilities of VGT systems to increase the boosting at low engine speed.
Technical Paper

A Physically-Based, Lumped-Parameter Model of an Electrically-Heated Three-Way Catalytic Converter

2012-04-16
2012-01-1240
The impact of cold-start emissions is well known on conventional and hybrid electric vehicles. Plug-in electric vehicles offer a unique challenge in that there are opportunities for prolonged engine-off conditions which can lead to catalyst cooling and elevated emissions on engine re-start. This research investigates the development and validation of a system for controlling emissions under these conditions, with an emphasis on a catalytic converter model used for design and analysis. The model is a one-dimensional, lumped-parameter model of a three-way catalytic converter developed in Matlab/Simulink. The catalyst is divided into discrete, axial elements and each discrete element contains states for the temperatures of the gas, substrate, and can wall. Heat transfer mechanisms are modeled from physics-based equations.
Technical Paper

A Rule-Based Control for Fuel-Efficient Automotive Air Conditioning Systems

2015-04-14
2015-01-0366
In a conventional passenger vehicle, the AC system is the largest ancillary load. This paper proposes a novel control strategy to reduce the energy consumption of the air conditioning system of a conventional passenger car. The problem of reducing the parasitic load of the AC system is first approached as a multi-objective optimization problem. Starting from a validated control-oriented model of an automotive AC system, an optimization problem is formalized to achieve the best possible fuel economy over a regulatory driving cycle, while guaranteeing the passenger comfort in terms of cabin temperature and reduce the wear of the components. To complete the formulation of the problem, a set of constraints on the pressure in the heat exchanger are defined to guarantee the safe operation of the system. The Dynamic Programming (DP), a numerical optimization technique, is then used to obtain the optimal solution in form of a control sequence over a prescribed driving cycle.
Technical Paper

Heat Rejection and Skin Temperatures of an Externally Cooled Exhaust Manifold

2015-04-14
2015-01-1736
The heat rejection rates and skin temperatures of a liquid cooled exhaust manifold on a 3.5 L Gasoline Turbocharged Direct Injection (GTDI) engine are determined experimentally using an external cooling circuit, which is capable of controlling the manifold coolant inlet temperature, outlet pressure, and flow rate. The manifold is equipped with a jacket that surrounds the collector region and is cooled with an aqueous solution of ethylene-glycol-based antifreeze to reduce skin temperatures. Results were obtained by sweeping the manifold coolant flow rate from 2.0 to 0.2 gpm at 12 different engine operating points of increasing brake power up to 220 hp. The nominal coolant inlet temperature and outlet pressure were 85 °C and 13 psig, respectively. Data were collected under steady conditions and time averaged. For the majority of operating conditions, the manifold heat rejection rate is shown to be relatively insensitive to changes in manifold coolant flow rate.
Technical Paper

Model and Controls Development of a Post-Transmission PHEV for the EcoCAR 3 Competition

2016-04-05
2016-01-1252
The Ohio State University EcoCAR 3 team is designing a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) post-transmission parallel 2016 Chevrolet Camaro. With the end-goal of reducing the environmental impact of the vehicle, the Ohio State Camaro has been designed to have a 44-mile all-electric range. The vehicle is to consist of an 18.9 kWh Li-ion energy storage system, a 119 kW 2.0L GDI I4 engine that runs on 85% ethanol (E85) fuel, a 5-speed automated manual transmission, and a 150 kW peak-power electric machine. This report details the model and controls development process followed by the Ohio State team during Year 1 of the EcoCAR 3 competition. The focus of the paper will be on overall development of a vehicle model, initial simulation results, and supervisory controls development. Finally, initial energy consumption results from the model and future improvements will be discussed.
Technical Paper

Development of the Design of a Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle for the EcoCAR 3 Competition

2016-04-05
2016-01-1257
The design of a performance hybrid electric vehicle includes a wide range of architecture possibilities. A large part of the design process is identifying reasonable vehicle architectures and vehicle performance capabilities. The Ohio State University EcoCAR 3 team designed a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) post-transmission parallel 2016 Chevrolet Camaro. With the end-goal of reducing the environmental impact of the vehicle, the Ohio State Camaro has been designed with a 44-mile all-electric range. It also features an 18.9 kWh Li-ion energy storage system, a 119 kW 2.0L GDI I4 engine that runs on 85% ethanol (E85) fuel, a 5-speed automated manual transmission, and a 150 kW peak electric machine. This report details the design and modeling process followed by the Ohio State team during Year 1 of the competition. The process included researching the customer needs of the vehicle, determining team design goals, initial modeling, and selecting a vehicle architecture.
Technical Paper

Development of Bicycle Surrogate for Bicyclist Pre-Collision System Evaluation

2016-04-05
2016-01-1447
As part of active safety systems for reducing bicyclist fatalities and injuries, Bicyclist Pre-Collision System (BPCS), also known as Bicyclist Autonomous Emergency Braking System, is being studied currently by several vehicles manufactures. This paper describes the development of a surrogate bicyclist which includes a surrogate bicycle and a surrogate bicycle rider to support the development and evaluation of BPCS. The surrogate bicycle is designed to represent the visual and radar characteristics of real bicyclists in the United States. The size of bicycle surrogate mimics the 26 inch adult bicycle, which is the most popular adult bicycle sold in the US. The radar cross section (RCS) of the surrogate bicycle is designed based on RCS measurement of the real adult sized bicycles.
Technical Paper

Impact Welding of Aluminum Alloy 6061 to Dual Phase 780 Steel Using Vaporizing Foil Actuator

2015-04-14
2015-01-0701
Vaporizing Foil Actuators (VFA) are based on the phenomenon of rapid vaporization of thin metallic foils and wires, caused by passage of a capacitor bank driven current on the order of 100 kA. The burst of the conductor is accompanied with a high-pressure pulse, which can be used for working metal at high strain rates. This paper focuses on the use of VFA for collision welding of dissimilar metals, in particular, aluminum and steel. Aluminum alloy 6061 sheets of 1 mm thickness were launched to velocities in excess of 650 m/s with input electrical energy of 8 kJ into 0.0762 mm thick, dog-bone shaped aluminum foil actuators. Target sheets made from dual phase steel (DP780) were impacted with the aluminum flyer sheet, and solid state impact welds were created. During mechanical testing, many samples failed outside the weld area, thereby indicating that the weld was stronger than the parent aluminum.
Technical Paper

Test Scenarios, Equipment and Testing Process for LDW LDP Performance Evaluation

2015-04-14
2015-01-1404
In this paper, a series of design, development, and implementation details for testing and evaluation of Lane Departure Warning and Prevention systems are being discussed. The approach taken to generate a set of repeatable and relevant test scenarios and to formulate the test procedures to ensure the fidelity of the collected data includes initial statistical analysis of applicable statistics; growth and probabilistic pruning of a test matrix; simulation studies to support procedure design; and vehicle instrumentation for data collection. The success of this comprehensive approach strongly suggests that the steps illustrated in this paper can serve as guidelines towards a more general class of vehicular safety and advanced driver assistance systems evaluation.
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