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Technical Paper

Modeling and Measurement of Occupied Car Seats

1999-05-17
1999-01-1690
An overview of model development for seated occupants is presented. Two approaches have been investigated for modeling the vertical response of a seated dummy: finite element and simplified mass-spring-damper methods. The construction and implementation of these models are described, and the various successes and drawbacks of each modeling approach are discussed. To evaluate the performance of the models, emphasis was also placed on producing accurate, repeatable measurements of the static and dynamic characteristics of a seated dummy.
Technical Paper

Analysis of Widespread Fatigue Damage in Lap Joints

1999-04-20
1999-01-1586
This paper describes research to analyze widespread fatigue damage in lap joints. The particular objective is to determine when large numbers of small cracks could degrade the joint strength to an unacceptable level. A deterministic model is described to compute fatigue crack growth and residual strength of riveted panels that contain multiple cracks. Fatigue crack growth tests conducted to evaluate the predictive model are summarized, and indicate good agreement between experimental and numerical results. Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to determine the influence of statistical variability on various analysis parameters.
Technical Paper

Numerical Modeling of the Damping Effect of Fibrous Acoustical Treatments

2001-04-30
2001-01-1462
The damping effect that is observed when a fibrous acoustical treatment is applied to a thin metal panel typical of automotive structures has been modeled by using three independent techniques. In the first two methods the fibrous treatment was modeled by using the limp frame formulation proposed by Bolton et al., while the third method makes use of a general poro-elastic model based on the Biot theory. All three methods have been found to provide consistent predictions that are in excellent agreement with one another. An examination of the numerical results shows that the structural damping effect results primarily from the suppression of the nearfield acoustical motion within the fibrous treatment, that motion being closely coupled with the vibration of the base panel. The observed damping effect is similar in magnitude to that provided by constrained layer dampers having the same mass per unit area as the fibrous layer.
Technical Paper

Average Value Modeling of Finite Inertia Power Systems with Harmonic Distortion

2000-10-31
2000-01-3648
Typically, average-value models of power system components neglect harmonic information. Herein, a systematic method of including harmonic information in average-value models based on the theory of multiple reference frames is set forth. Computer simulation results show that when there is significant harmonic distortion of the ac distribution bus the models presented herein are more accurate than traditional average-value models. Furthermore, much of the computational advantage of average-value techniques over detailed modeling techniques is retained.
Technical Paper

Modeling of Nonlinear Elastomeric Mounts. Part 1: Dynamic Testing and Parameter Identification

2001-03-05
2001-01-0042
A methodology for modeling elastomeric mounts as nonlinear lumped parameter models is discussed. A key feature of this methodology is that it integrates dynamic test results under different conditions into the model. The first step is to model the mount as a linear model that is simple but reproduces accurately results from dynamic tests under small excitations. Frequency Response Functions (FRF) enables systematic calculation of the parameters for the model. Under more realistic excitation, the mount exhibits non-linearity, which is investigated in the next step. For nonlinear structures, a simple and intuitive method is to use time-domain force-displacement (F-x) curves. Experiments to obtain the F-x curves involve controlling the displacement excitation and measuring the induced forces. From the F-x curves, stiffness and damping parameters are obtained with an optimization technique.
Technical Paper

Modeling of Nonlinear Elastomeric Mounts. Part 2: Comparing Numerical Model and Test Results

2001-03-05
2001-01-0043
This paper presents the continuation of the modeling work described in a companion paper “Modeling of Nonlinear Elastomeric Mounts. Part 1: Dynamic Testing and Parameter Identification” by the same authors. That paper discussed a dynamic test procedure and an optimization methodology to identify and model an elastomeric mount as a non-linear lumped parameter structure. This paper discusses a numerical modeling methodology to confirm or improve the agreement between the dynamic test results and the input-output relationship of the analytical model generated in the companion paper. In this paper, the model developed in the companion paper and the model parameters are input into a dynamic simulation model using a commercial simulation package. The model is then run to produce the numerical force-versus-displacement (F-x) curves of the mount. The numerical F-x curves are compared with the F-x curves obtained from the experiments.
Technical Paper

Dynamic Simulation Techniques for Steering of Tracked Agricultural and Forestry Vehicles

1999-09-13
1999-01-2786
A procedure for simulating the dynamics of agricultural and forestry machines using mechanical system simulation software is presented. A soil/track interface model including rubber-track and steel-track was introduced as well as equations that can be used to model mechanical and hydraulic power trains commonly found in tracked vehicles. Two rubber-tracked vehicles (agricultural tractors) and two steel-tracked machines (forestry vehicles) were simulated to illustrate the technique, and some analysis results are presented. The examples given in this paper are based on the author’s research over the past several years.
Technical Paper

Characterization of a Vibration Damping Mount

1999-09-13
1999-01-2816
Several available mathematical models for vibration dampers were compared to dynamic test results. The comparison results in a simple model that agrees well with both the magnitude and phase characteristics of experimentally obtained frequency response functions. The resulting model can be used as a correct boundary condition for finite element models of the structure to which the dampers are attached.
Technical Paper

Conditions In Which Vaporizing Fuel Drops Reach A Critical State In A Diesel Engine

1999-03-01
1999-01-0511
It has been shown recently that the maximum penetration of the liquid phase in a vaporizing Diesel spray is relatively short compared to the overall jet penetration and that this maximum is reached in 2 - 4°CA after start of injection. This implies that the drops that are formed by atomization vaporize in a short characteristic time and length relative to other physical processes. This paper addresses an important question related to this observation: Are the vaporizing fuel drops disappearing because they reach a critical state? Related to this question is another: Under what conditions will vaporizing fuel drops reach a critical state in a Diesel engine? Single drops of pure component liquid hydrocarbons and their mixtures vaporizing in quiescent nitrogen or carbon dioxide gas environments with ambient pressures and temperatures at values typically found in Diesel engines are examined.
Technical Paper

A Mixture Fraction Averaged Approach to Modeling NO and Soot in Diesel Engines

2001-03-05
2001-01-1005
Multidimensional models are increasingly employed to predict NO and soot emissions from Diesel engines. In the traditional approach, the ensemble-averaged values of variables are employed in the expressions for NO and soot formation and oxidation. In the mixture fraction averaged approach, the values of state variables and species concentrations are obtained from the structure of laminar diffusion flames. The source terms for NO and soot are then obtained by averaging across the mixture fraction coordinate with a probability density function. The clipped-Gaussian probability density function and profiles obtained by employing the OPPDIF code (part of the CHEMKIN package) for the laminar flame structure are employed in this work. The Zeldovich mechanism for NO formation and the Moss et al. formation and Nagle-Strickland-Constable oxidation model for soot have been employed to study the qualitative trends of pollutants in transient combusting Diesel jets.
Technical Paper

Truck Ride — A Mathematical and Empirical Study

1969-02-01
690099
“Truck Ride” in this study refers to some vehicle ride parameters involved in tractor-trailer combinations. For the study, a mathematical model of a tractor-trailer vehicle as a vibrating system was developed. Principles of vibration theory were applied to the model while a digital computer was employed to investigate the complex system. To parallel the analytical investigation of the tractor-trailer vehicle, vehicle studies were conducted using a magnetic tape recorder and associated instrumentation installed in the tractor. Parameters studied included coupler position on the tractor, laden weight of trailer, spring rates of the different axles of the combination, damping capacity associated with each spring rate, vehicle speed, and “tar strip” spacing of the highway and cab mountings. The mathematical results were used as a basis for empirical study. A comparison of calculated and empirical data are reported.
Technical Paper

Modeling of Machine Tool Dynamics and Chatter Prediction

1998-06-02
981840
Dynamics of machine tool components play a critical role in the outcome of machining processes. This paper addresses several important issues on machine tool and machining dynamics. It illustrates the dynamic behavior of structural components under operating conditions and presents an improved technique for modeling structural non-linearity. It also describes spindle modeling capability that has been developed to predict dynamic and thermal characteristics of spindle systems. Finally, the paper discusses the impact of non-linear dynamics on machining stability.
Technical Paper

Comparisons of Computed and Measured Results of Combustion in a Diesel Engine

1998-02-23
980786
Results of computations of flows, sprays and combustion performed in an optically- accessible Diesel engine are presented. These computed results are compared with measured values of chamber pressure, liquid penetration, and soot distribution, deduced from flame luminosity photographs obtained in the engine at Sandia National Laboratories and reported in the literature. The computations were performed for two operating conditions representing low load and high load conditions as reported in the experimental work. The computed and measured peak pressures agree within 5% for both the low load and the high load conditions. The heat release rates derived from the computations are consistent with expectations for Diesel combustion with a premixed phase of heat release and then a diffusion phase. The computed soot distribution shows noticeable differences from the measured one.
Technical Paper

The Computed Structure of a Combusting Transient Jet Under Diesel Conditions

1998-02-23
981071
Numerical computations of combusting transient jets are performed under diesel-like conditions. Discussions of the structure of such jets are presented from global and detailed points of view. From a global point of view, we show that the computed flame heights agree with deductions from theory and that integrated soot mass and heat release rates are consistent with expected trends. We present results of several paramaters which characterise the details of the jet structure. These are fuel mass fractions, temperature, heat release rates, soot and NO. Some of these parameters are compared with the structure of a combusting diesel spray as deduced from measurements and reported in the literature. The heat release rate contours show that the region of chemical reactions is confined to a thin sheet as expected for a diffusion flame. The soot contour plots appear to agree qualitatively with the experimental observations.
Technical Paper

Multiple Reference Frame Analysis of Non-sinusoidal Brushless DC Drives

1998-04-21
981269
The method of multiple reference frames is employed in the development of a state variable model for brushless DC drives with non-sinusoidal back emf waveforms. This model has the desirable features of being valid for transient and steady-state analysis as well as having state variables that are constant in the steady-state. The model facilitates both nonlinear and linear system analysis and control design. Computer simulation and experimental data are included to validate the analysis.
Technical Paper

Simulation of MADMEL Power Systems Components

1998-04-21
981258
Detailed computer models of system components for More Electric Aircraft have been developed using the Advanced Control System Language (ACSL) and its graphical front-end, Graphic Modeller. Among the devices modeled are a wound-rotor synchronous generator with parallel bridge-rectifier outputs, a switched-reluctance generator, and various loads including a DC-DC converter, an inverter-driven induction motor, and an electro-hydrostatic actuator. Results from the simulations are presented together with corroborating experimental test results.
Technical Paper

An Automated State Model Generation Algorithm for Simulation/Analysis of Power Systems with Power Electronic Components

1998-04-21
981256
In this paper, a recently-developed algorithmic method of deriving the state equations of power systems containing power electronic components is described. Therein the system is described by the pertinent branch parameters and the circuit topology; however, unlike circuit-based algorithms, the difference equations are not implemented at the branch level. Instead, the composite system state equations are established. A demonstration of the computer implementation of this algorithm to model a variable-speed, constant-frequency aircraft generation system is described. Because of the large number of states and complexity of the system, particular attention is placed on the development of a model structure which provides optimal simulation efficiency.
Technical Paper

Multi-Material Topology Optimization for Crashworthiness Using Hybrid Cellular Automata

2019-04-02
2019-01-0826
Structures with multiple materials have now become one of the perceived necessities for automotive industry to address vehicle design requirements such as light-weight, safety, and cost. The objective of this study is to develop a design methodology for multi-material structures accountable for vehicle crash durability. The heuristic topology synthesis approach of Hybrid Cellular Automaton (HCA) framework is implemented to generate multi-material structures with the constraint on the volume fraction of the final design. The HCA framework is integrated with ordered-SIMP (solid isotropic material with penalization) interpolation, artificial material library, as well as statistical analysis of material distribution data to ensure a smooth transition between multiple practical materials during the topology synthesis.
Technical Paper

Structural Optimization of Thin-Walled Tubular Structures for Progressive Collapse Using Hybrid Cellular Automaton with a Prescribed Response Field

2019-04-02
2019-01-0837
The design optimization of thin-walled tubular structures is of relevance in the automotive industry due to their low cost, ease of manufacturing and installation, and high-energy absorption efficiency. This study presents a methodology to design thin-walled tubular structures for crashworthiness applications. During an impact, thin-walled tubular structures may exhibit progressive collapse/buckling, global collapse/buckling, or mixed collapse/buckling. From a crashworthiness standpoint, the most desirable collapse mode is progressive collapse due to its high-energy absorption efficiency, stable deformation, and low peak crush force (PCF). In the automotive industry, thin-walled components have complex structural geometries. These complexities and the several loading conditions present in a crash reduce the possibility of progressive collapse. The Hybrid Cellular Automata (HCA) method has shown to be an efficient continuum-based approach in crashworthiness design.
Technical Paper

Thin-Walled Compliant Mechanism Component Design Assisted by Machine Learning and Multiple Surrogates

2015-04-14
2015-01-1369
This work introduces a new design algorithm to optimize progressively folding thin-walled structures and in order to improve automotive crashworthiness. The proposed design algorithm is composed of three stages: conceptual thickness distribution, design parameterization, and multi-objective design optimization. The conceptual thickness distribution stage generates an innovative design using a novel one-iteration compliant mechanism approach that triggers progressive folding even on irregular structures under oblique impact. The design parameterization stage optimally segments the conceptual design into a reduced number of clusters using a machine learning K-means algorithm. Finally, the multi-objective design optimization stage finds non-dominated designs of maximum specific energy absorption and minimum peak crushing force.
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