Refine Your Search

Topic

Search Results

Technical Paper

Influence of Intake Port Charge-Motion-Control-Valve on Mixture Preparation in a Port-Fuel-Injection Engine

2007-10-29
2007-01-4013
The effects of the directed port flow produced by a Charge-Motion-Control-Valve (CMCV) on mixture preparation in a Port-Fuel-Injection engine were assessed under conditions typical of fast idle in a cold start process. The port fuel was found to comprise two components: a “valve” puddle (at the vicinity of the valve) that built up quickly, and that was mainly responsible for the delivery of the fuel to the cylinder charge; a “port” puddle located significantly upstream. The latter was mainly created by the reverse back flow process and built up slowly. Although the fuel amounts in these two components were roughly the same, the latter did not significantly interact with the fuel transport to the cylinder charge. The CMCV only weakly affected the purging or filling time of the valve puddle, hence the dynamics of the fuel delivery process was not materially affected.
Journal Article

Trends in Performance Characteristics of Modern Automobile SI and Diesel Engines

2009-06-15
2009-01-1892
A prior study (Chon and Heywood, [1]) examined how the design and performance of spark-ignition engines evolved in the United States during the 1980s and 1990s. This paper carries out a similar analysis of trends in basic engine design and performance characteristics over the past decade. Available databases on engine specifications in the U.S., Europe, and Japan were used as the sources of information. Parameters analyzed were maximum torque, power, and speed; number of cylinders and engine configuration, cylinder displacement, bore, stroke, compression ratio; valvetrain configuration, number of valves and their control; port or direct fuel injection; naturally-aspirated or turbocharged engine concepts; spark-ignition and diesel engines. Design features are correlated with these engine’s performance parameters, normalized by engine and cylinder displacement.
Technical Paper

Oil Transport Inside the Power Cylinder During Transient Load Changes

2007-04-16
2007-01-1054
This paper presents a study of lubricating oil transport and exchange in a four-stroke spark ignition engine while undergoing transient load changes. The study consisted of experiments with a single cylinder test engine utilizing 2D LIF (Two Dimensional Laser Induced Fluorescence) techniques to view real time oil transport and exchange, along with computer modeling to describe certain phenomenon observed during the experiments. The computer modeling results included ring dynamics and corresponding gas flows through different regions of the power cylinder. Under steady-state conditions and constant speed during the experiments, more oil was observed on the piston at low load than at high load. Therefore, a transition from low load to high load resulted in oil leaving the piston, and a transition from high load to low load resulted in oil being added to the piston.
Technical Paper

The Influences of Cylinder Liner Honing Patterns and Oil Control Ring Design Parameters on the Interaction between the Twinland Oil Control Ring and the Cylinder Liner in Internal Combustion Engines

2008-06-23
2008-01-1614
This paper discusses the influences of several cylinder liner honing surface geometrical features on the interaction between the piston twin land oil control ring (TLOCR) and the cylinder liner by using the deterministic hydrodynamic model [1] and the twin land oil control ring model [2]. Additionally, the key design parameters of the TLOCR, including ring tension and land axial width are studied. The results show significant effects of three liner honing surface features beyond height distribution, including plateau wavelength, groove density and honing angle in hydrodynamic pressure generation. The study in oil control ring design parameters reveals that both ring tension and land axial width have important influences on friction and oil consumption, and their competing effects are discussed subsequently.
Technical Paper

A Simplified Piston Secondary Motion Model Considering the Dynamic and Static Deformation of Piston Skirt and Cylinder Bore in Internal Combustion Engines

2008-06-23
2008-01-1612
A dry piston secondary dynamics model has been developed. This model includes the detailed piston and cylinder bore hot shape geometries, and piston deformations due to combustion pressure, axial inertia and interaction with the cylinder bore, but neglects the effects of the hydrodynamic lubrication at the piston - cylinder bore interface in order to achieve faster calculation times. The piston - cylinder bore friction is calculated using a user supplied friction coefficient. This model provides a very useful, fast tool for power cylinder system analysis, provided its limitations are understood.
Journal Article

A Novel Accelerated Aging System to Study Lubricant Additive Effects on Diesel Aftertreatment System Degradation

2008-06-23
2008-01-1549
The challenge posed by the long run times necessary to accurately quantify ash effects on diesel aftertreatment systems has led to numerous efforts to artificially accelerate ash loading, with varying degrees of success. In this study, a heavy-duty diesel engine was outfitted with a specially designed rapid lubricant degradation and aftertreatment ash loading system. Unlike previous attempts, the proposed methodology utilizes a series of thermal reactors and combustors to simulate all three major oil consumption mechanisms, namely combustion in the power cylinder, evaporative and volatile losses, and liquid losses through the valve and turbocharger seals. In order to simulate these processes, each thermal reactor allows for the precise control of the level of lubricant additive degradation, as well as the form and quantity of degradation products introduced into the exhaust upstream of the aftertreatment system.
Technical Paper

Effects of Combustion Phasing, Relative Air-fuel Ratio, Compression Ratio, and Load on SI Engine Efficiency

2006-04-03
2006-01-0229
In an effort to both increase engine efficiency and generate new, consistent, and reliable data useful for the development of engine concepts, a modern single-cylinder 4-valve spark-ignition research engine was used to determine the response of indicated engine efficiency to combustion phasing, relative air-fuel ratio, compression ratio, and load. Combustion modeling was then used to help explain the observed trends, and the limitations on achieving higher efficiency. This paper analyzes the logic behind such gains in efficiency and presents correlations of the experimental data. The results are helpful for examining the potential for more efficient engine designs, where high compression ratios can be used under lean or dilute regimes, at a variety of loads.
Technical Paper

Liquid Fuel Flow in the Vicinity of the Intake Valve of a Port-Injected SI Engine

1998-10-19
982471
Liquid fuel flow into the cylinder an important source of hydrocarbon (HC) emissions of an SI engine. This is an especially important HC source during engine warm up. This paper examines the phenomena that determine the inflow of liquid fuel through the intake valve during a simulated start-up procedure. A Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) was used to measure the size and velocity of liquid fuel droplets in the vicinity of the intake valve in a firing transparent flow-visualization engine. These characteristics were measured as a function of engine running time and crank angle position during four stroke cycle. Droplet characteristics were measured at 7 angular positions in 5 planes around the circumference of the intake valve for both open and closed-valve injection. Additionally the cone shaped geometry of the entering liquid fuel spray was visualized using a Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) setup on the same engine.
Technical Paper

Combustion Optimization in a Hydrogen-Enhanced Lean-Burn SI Engine

2005-04-11
2005-01-0251
As part of ongoing research on hydrogen-enhanced lean burn SI engines, this paper details an experimental combustion system optimization program. Experiments focused on three key areas: the ignition system, in-cylinder charge motion produced by changes in the inlet ports, and uniformity of fuel-air mixture preparation. Hydrogen enhancement is obtained with a H2, CO, N2 mixture produced by a fuel reformer such as the plasmatron. The ignition system tests compared a standard inductive coil scheme against high-energy discharge systems. Charge motion experiments focused on the impact of different flow and turbulence patterns generated within the cylinder by restrictor plates at the intake port entrance, as well as novel inlet flow modification cones. The in-cylinder fluid motion generated by each configuration was characterized using swirl and tumble flow benches. Mixture preparation tests compared a standard single-hole pintle port fuel injector against a fine atomizing 12-hole injector.
Technical Paper

Modeling Engine Oil Vaporization and Transport of the Oil Vapor in the Piston Ring Pack of Internal Combustion Engines

2004-10-25
2004-01-2912
A model was developed to study engine oil vaporization and oil vapor transport in the piston ring pack of internal combustion engines. With the assumption that the multi-grade oil can be modeled as a compound of a number of distinct paraffin hydrocarbons, a set of equations governing the oil vapor density variations were derived by applying mass conservation law to the amount of oil vaporized from the piston and the amount of oil vapor transported within the piston ring pack. The model was applied to a heavy-duty diesel engine. First, the case with the maximum oil supply to all the piston regions was studied. The results showed that, under this condition, the oil consumption from piston vaporization alone was far greater than the typical oil consumption value measured in the engine.
Technical Paper

Effects of Piston Design Parameters on Piston Secondary Motion and Skirt-Liner Friction

2004-10-25
2004-01-2911
In this paper, a previously developed and experimentally-validated piston secondary motion model has been improved further numerically and applied to understand the detailed interactions between the piston skirt and cylinder liner for various piston design parameters. The model considers the roughness of the surfaces and the topography of the skirt in both the axial (barrel profile) and circumferential directions (ovality). Three modes of lubrication: hydrodynamic, mixed, and boundary lubrication regimes have been considered and the skirt is partially flooded in most cases. Elastic deformation of the skirt is an essential part of the model. In this model, the piston dynamic behavior, frictional and impact forces are predicted as functions of crank angle and are examined in detail. Parameters investigated include piston skirt profile, piston to liner clearance, surface roughness, and oil availability.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Study of Oil Transport on the Piston Third Land and the Effects of Piston and Ring Designs

2004-06-08
2004-01-1934
Faced with increasing concern for lubricating oil consumption and engine friction, it is critical to understand the oil transport mechanisms in the power cylinder system. Lubricating oil travels through distinct regions along the piston ring pack before being consumed in the combustion chamber, with the oil distribution and dominant driving forces varying substantially for each of these regions. In this work, the focus is on the lowest region in the piston ring pack, namely the third land, which is located between the second compression ring and the oil control ring. A detailed 2D LIF (Two Dimensional Laser Induced Fluorescence) study has been performed on the oil distribution and flow patterns of the third land throughout the entire cycle of a single cylinder spark ignition engine. The impact of speed and load were experimentally observed with the LIF generated real time high-resolution images, as were changes in piston and ring design.
Technical Paper

Modeling Piston Ring-Pack Lubrication With Consideration of Ring Structural Response

2005-04-11
2005-01-1641
The lubrication of the piston ring-pack is directly related to the engine friction and oil consumption. Non-axisymmetric characteristics of the power cylinder system, most noticeably cylinder bore distortion, piston secondary motion, and ring gaps, can introduce circumferential variations to ring/liner lubrication and overall performance of the ring-pack in friction and oil consumption. In order to be able to optimize the piston ring-pack in a more fundamental way, it is necessary to develop physical understanding of the effects of these non-axisymmetric properties and effective numerical tools. In this study, a comprehensive model has been developed for the lubrication of a piston ring-pack. By employing a finite element analysis, this model is capable of evaluating the in-plane structural response of a ring to external forces. A newly developed one-dimensional hydrodynamic lubrication sub-model is implemented to calculate the lubrication force at each cross-section.
Technical Paper

An Improved Friction Model for Spark-Ignition Engines

2003-03-03
2003-01-0725
A spark-ignition engine friction model developed by Patton et al. in the late 1980s was evaluated against current engine friction data, and improved. The model, which was based on a combination of fundamental scaling laws and empirical results, includes predictions of rubbing losses from the crankshaft, reciprocating, and valvetrain components, auxiliary losses from engine accessories, and pumping losses from the intake and exhaust systems. These predictions were based on engine friction data collected between 1980 and 1988. Some of the terms are derived from lubrication theory. Other terms were derived empirically from measurements of individual friction components from engine teardown experiments. Recent engine developments (e.g., improved oils, surface finish on piston liners, valve train mechanisms) suggested that the model needed updating.
Technical Paper

Mixture Preparation and Hydrocarbon Emissions Behaviors in the First Cycle of SI Engine Cranking

2002-10-21
2002-01-2805
The mixture preparation and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions behaviors for a single-cylinder port-fuel-injection SI engine were examined in an engine/dynamometer set up that simulated the first cycle of cranking. The engine was motored continuously at a fixed low speed with the ignition on, and fuel was injected every 8 cycles. Unlike the real engine cranking process, the set up provided a well controlled and repeatable environment to study the cranking process. The parameters were the Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT), speed, and the fuel injection pulse width. The in-cylinder and exhaust HC were measured simultaneously with two Fast-response Flame Ionization Detectors. A large amount of injected fuel (an order of magnitude larger than the normal amount that would produce a stoichiometric mixture in a warm-up engine) was required to form a combustible mixture at low temperatures.
Technical Paper

Spark Ignition Engine Hydrocarbon Emissions Behaviors in Stopping and Restarting

2002-10-21
2002-01-2804
Engine Hydrocarbon (HC) emissions behaviors in the shut down and re-start processes were examined in a production 4-cylinder 2.4 L engine. Depending on when the power to the ECU was cut off relative to the engine events, there could be two or three mis-fired cylinders (i.e. cylinders with fuel injected but no ignition). The total HC pumped out by the engine into the catalyst in the stopping process was ∼ 4 mg (approximately equaled to the amount of one injection at idle condition). Because the size of the catalyst was larger than the total exhaust volume in the stopping process, this HC was not observed at the catalyst exit. The catalyst temperature was also not affected. When the engine was purged after shut down (by cranking the engine with the injectors and ignition disconnected), the total exit HC was 33 mg. In a restart 90 minutes after shut down, the integrated amount of HC emissions due to residual fuel from the stopping process was 16 mg.
Technical Paper

Fuel Metering Effects on Hydrocarbon Emissions and Engine Stability During Cranking and Start-up in a Port Fuel Injected Spark Ignition Engine

2000-10-16
2000-01-2836
A cycle by cycle analysis of engine behavior during the first few cycles of cranking and start-up was performed on a production four-cylinder engine. Experiments were performed to elucidate the effects of initial engine position (rest position after last engine shut-down), first and second cycle fueling, engine temperature, and spark timing on fuel delivery to the cylinder, engine-out Hydrocarbon (EOHC) emissions, and Gross Indicated Mean Effective Pressure (IMEPg). The most important effect of the piston starting position is on the first firing cycle engine rpm, which influences the IMEPg through combustion phasing. Because of the low rpm values for the first cycle, combustion is usually too advanced with typical production engine ignition timing. For both the hot start and the ambient start, the threshold for firing is at an in-cylinder air equivalence ratio (λ) of 1.1.
Technical Paper

Analysis of Oil Consumption Behavior during Ramp Transients in a Production Spark Ignition Engine

2001-09-24
2001-01-3544
Engine oil consumption is recognized to be a significant source of pollutant emissions. Unburned or partially burned oil in the exhaust gases contributes directly to hydrocarbon and particulate emissions. In addition, chemical compounds present in oil additives poison catalytic converters and reduce their conversion efficiency. Oil consumption can increase significantly during critical non-steady operating conditions. This study analyzes the oil consumption behavior during ramp transients in load by combining oil consumption measurements, in-cylinder measurements, and computer-based modeling. A sulfur based oil consumption method was used to measure real-time oil consumption during ramp transients in load at constant speed in a production spark ignition engine. Additionally in-cylinder liquid oil behavior along the piston was studied using a one-point Laser-Induced-Fluorescence (LIF) technique.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Chamber Geometry on Spark-Ignition Engine Combustion

1983-02-01
830334
The way In which combustion chamber geometry affects combustion in SI engines was studied using a quasi-diraensional cycle simulation. Calculations were performed to investigate the following questions: (i) the sensitivity of geometric effects on combustion to engine operating conditions; (ii) the differences in burn duration between ten chamber geometries and spark plug locations; and (iii) the relative merits of improved chamber design and amplified turbulence as means to reduce burn duration. The results from these studies are presented and discussed.
Technical Paper

Flow in the Piston-Cylinder-Ring Crevices of a Spark-Ignition Engine: Effect on Hydrocarbon Emissions, Efficiency and Power

1982-02-01
820088
The flow into and out of the piston top-land crevice of a spark-ignition engine has been studied, using a square-cross-section single-cylinder engine with two parallel quartz glass walls which permit optical access to the entire cylinder volume. Schlieren short-time exposure photographs and high speed movies were used to define the essential features of this flow. The top-land crevice and the regions behind and between the rings consist of volumes connected through the ring gaps. A system model of volumes and orifices was therefore developed and used to predict the flow into and out of the crevice regions between the piston, piston rings and cylinder wall.
X