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Technical Paper

Galvanic Corrosion Behavior of Copper and Stainless Steel in Heat Exchanger Environments

1993-04-01
931109
Vehicle heat exchangers are exposed to a number of aqueous environments ranging from inhibited coolants to seawater. Frequently, the design of the heat exchanger results in a galvanic couple between copper and a stainless steel. This couple can either prevent or promote pitting and crevice corrosion of the stainless steel member. This paper demonstrates the use of electrochemical corrosion measurement techniques to predict this behavior. Stainless steels which have acceptable, marginal and unacceptable resistance to localized corrosion when coupled to copper in aggressive environments are described. Potentiodynamic polarization curves for a variety of stainless steels were measured in artificial seawater to determine their pitting and critical protection potentials. Mixed potential measurements for these alloys galvanically coupled to copper were then made to predict the localized corrosion behavior of the stainless steel.
Technical Paper

Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum-Transition-Steel Joints for Automobiles

1993-10-01
932353
Transition materials consisting of steel clad aluminum have been used to join aluminum and steel. This technique allows joining by resistance spot welding since the clad transition material allows the actual transition from one metal to the other to occur at the clad bond interface. Welding studies show that in the recommended range of weld parameters, high strength joints are produced. A wide range of corrosion tests have been used to determine the durability of these joints in automotive environments. Results show that the use of transition material in joining aluminum to steel or EG steel eliminates galvanic corrosion.
Technical Paper

Corrosion Mechanisms in Bright Stainless Steel Trim Systems

1993-10-01
932333
Exterior automotive trim materials are exposed to aggressive environments and therefore must have satisfactory corrosion resistance. Stainless steel materials such as bimetal (stainless steel clad aluminum) are therefore used extensively in this application. This paper addresses the effect of surface contamination on the corrosion behavior of stainless steels which have been fabricated with the application of a PVC polyfilm protector. The effect of residual deposits on the stainless steel has been investigated using CASS and cyclic immersion corrosion tests, Auger analysis, and gas chromatography coupled with Fourier Transform Infrared Analysis (FTIR). The mechanism of reduced corrosion resistance attributed to these residual deposits is described.
Technical Paper

Joining Dissimilar Metals With Transition Materials

1976-02-01
760714
Galvanic corrosion and mechanical properties are major design considerations for bimetallic assemblies. Galvanic corrosion can lead to rapid degradation while welding of dissimilar metals such as steel and aluminum can lead to reduced structural stability. This paper describes a new concept in joining dissimilar metals involving the use of transition materials. The clad transition materials is composed of the dissimilar metals to be joined and effectively reduces the corrosion and mechanical problems associated with the system. Results of galvanic corrosion field tests and welding studies for transition materials are presented and several examples of automotive applications are cited.
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