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Technical Paper

Friction Stir Welding-A Revolutionary New Joining Method

1998-09-15
982149
Friction Stir Welding (FSW) can achieve high quality welds in aluminum alloys that are of interest to the aerospace industry (e.g. alloys 2014, 2219, 7050 and numerous aluminum-lithium alloys). The low distortion solid-phase welds exhibit metallurgical and mechanical properties, including fatigue, which are superior to conventional fusion welds achieved by arc processes. FSW, although a relatively new welding technique, has been systematically developed and proved by The Welding Institute (TWI) under contract to an international group of sponsors, one of which is The Boeing Company. To further validate the process, The Boeing Company conducted separate development activities including detailed mechanical testing of welds made from the FSW process.
Technical Paper

Integrated Air Interchange System Performance for Early Internatonal Space Station Assembly Missions

1998-07-13
981588
A multi-element fixed control volume integrated air interchange system performance computer model has been developed and upgraded for the evaluation/assessment of atmospheric characteristics inside the crew compartments of the mated Orbiter and International Space Station (ISS). In order to ensure a safe, comfortable, and habitable environment for all the astronauts during the Orbiter/ISS docked period, this model was utilized to conduct the analysis for supporting the early ISS assembly missions. Two ISS assembly missions #2A and #4A were selected and analyzed.
Technical Paper

3D Re-Engineering: A Comprehensive Process for Solving Production Assembly Fit Problems

1998-06-02
981835
Dimensional Management (DM) is a methodology to predict and control the impact of variation on assembly from, fit, and function. Application of Dimensional Management tools and other modeling and simulation techniques are combined in a process called 3D Re-Engineering for application to existing production designs. Analytical techniques for predicting the impact of variation on assembly fit, and corresponding methods for controlling variation are presented, as used in a production environment for root cause corrective action on existing assembly fit problems. Assembly variation analysis is typically performed early in the product development phases, by coordinating datums, assembly sequences, assembly methods, and detail part tolerances across the product development team.
Technical Paper

Simulation Enhanced Work Instructions for Aircraft Assemblies

1998-06-02
981861
The Boeing Company is developing and implementing the tools for the 21st Century for product development with their Design Manufacturing and Producibility Simulation (DMAPS) program. DMAPS combines the best of people, hardware and software tools commercially available to develop product and process simulation applications. The DMAPS toolset enhances the process of preparing concept layouts, assembly layouts and build-to-packages. Comprised of an Integrated Product and Process Team (IPPT), DMAPS produces products faster and with higher quality. The result is a process that eliminates costly changes and rework, and provides all IPPT's the tools and training necessary to perform their tasks right the first time. Boeing applies DMAPS tools to a variety of existing and new programs to build more affordable products. Savings goals set forth by the program are shown in Figure 1.
Technical Paper

Modification of the USOS to Support Installation and Activation of the Node 3 Element

2009-07-12
2009-01-2416
The International Space Station (ISS) program is nearing an assembly complete configuration with the addition of the final resource node module in early 2010. The Node 3 module will provide critical functionality in support of permanent long duration crews aboard ISS. The new module will permanently house the regenerative Environment Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and will also provide important habitability functions such as waste management and exercise facilities. The ISS program has selected the Port side of the Node 1 “Unity” module as the permanent location for Node 3 which will necessitate architecture changes to provide the required interfaces. The USOS ECLSS fluid and ventilation systems, Internal Thermal Control Systems, and Avionics Systems require significant modifications in order to support Node 3 interfaces at the Node 1 Port location since it was not initially designed for that configuration.
Technical Paper

Development and Implementation of Sol-Gel Coatings for Aerospace Applications

2009-11-10
2009-01-3208
A family of water-based sol-gel coatings has been developed as an environmentally-friendly alternative to traditional aerospace finishing materials and processes. The sol-gel hybrid network is based on a reactive mixture of an organo-functionalized silane with a stabilized zirconium complex. Thin films of the material self-assemble on metal surfaces, resulting in a gradient coating that provides durable adhesion for paints, adhesives, and sealants. Use of the novel coating as a surface pretreatment for the exterior of commercial aircraft has enabled environmental, health, and safety benefits due to elimination of hexavalent chromium, and flight test and early fleet survey data support the laboratory observations that the sol gel coating reduces the occurrence of “rivet rash” adhesion failures. Modifications of the basic inorganic/organic hybrid network have yielded multifunctional coatings with promise for applications such as corrosion control and oxidation protection.
Technical Paper

Microbial Characterization of Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Hardware Surfaces after Five Years of Operation in the International Space Station

2006-07-17
2006-01-2157
A flex hose assembly containing aqueous coolant from the International Space Station (ISS) Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) consisting of a 2 foot section of Teflon hose and quick disconnects (QDs) and a Special Performance Checkout Unit (SPCU) heat exchanger containing separate channels of IATCS coolant and iodinated water used to cool spacesuits and Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) were returned for destructive analyses on Shuttle return to flight mission STS-114. The original aqueous IATCS coolant used in Node 1, the Laboratory Module, and the Airlock consisted of water, borate (pH buffer), phosphate (corrosion control), and silver sulfate (microbiological control) at a pH of 9.5 ± 0.5.
Technical Paper

Efficient Assembly Integration and Test (EAIT) Moves Theory to Practice at a System Level to Effect Lean Outcomes on the Shop Floor

2009-11-10
2009-01-3169
This paper will describe the Efficient Assembly Integration and Test (EAIT) system level project operated as a partnership among Boeing business units, universities, and suppliers. The focus is on the successful implementation and sharing of technology solutions to develop a model based, multi-product pulsed line factory of the future. The EAIT philosophy presented in this paper focuses on a collaborative environment that is tightly woven with the Lean Initiatives at Boeing's satellite development center. The prototype is comprised of a platform that includes a wireless instrumentation system, rapid bonding materials and virtual test of guidance hardware there are examples of collaborative development in collaboration with suppliers. Wireless tools and information systems are also being developed across the Boeing Company. Virtual reality development will include university partners in the US and India.
Technical Paper

Laser Tracker Assisted Aircraft Machining and Assembly

2008-09-16
2008-01-2313
The patented (US 7,277,811 B1) Position Bar provides precise measurement, machining and drilling data for large Engineering and Tooling structure. The Position Bar also supports end item verification seamlessly in the same machining control code. Position Bar measurements are fast, accurate, and repeatable. The true centerline of the machine tool's spindle bearings are being measured to within .002 in a 20 foot cubic volume (20×20×20). True “I”, “J”, & “K” machine tool spindle positions are also precisely measured. Any Gantry or Post Mill Tool can be converted to a Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) with this laser tracker controlled Position Bar. Determinant Assembly (D.A.) holes, for fuselage and wing structures are drilled and then measured to within .006 in X, Y, & Z, over a 40 foot distance. Average laser tracker measurement time, per hole, is 2 seconds.
Technical Paper

777X Control Surface Assembly Using Advanced Robotic Automation

2017-09-19
2017-01-2092
Fabrication and assembly of the majority of control surfaces for Boeing’s 777X airplane is completed at the Boeing Defense, Space and Security (BDS) site in St. Louis, Missouri. The former 777 airplane has been revamped to compete with affordability goals and contentious markets requiring cost-effective production technologies with high maturity and reliability. With tens of thousands of fasteners per shipset, the tasks of drilling, countersinking, hole inspection, and temporary fastener installation are automated. Additionally and wherever possible, blueprint fasteners are automatically installed. Initial production is supported by four (4) Electroimpact robotic systems embedded into a pulse-line production system requiring strategic processing and safeguarding solutions to manage several key layout, build and product flow constraints.
Technical Paper

Dual Electric Spindle Retrofit for Wing Riveters

2006-09-12
2006-01-3176
The Boeing Company (Renton Division) had a requirement for a 30,000 RPM spindle to provide improved surface finish when milling 2034 ice box rivets in hydraulic wing riveters. Electroimpact supplied an electrical spindle which fit into the same cylinder block as the hydraulic spindle. This was reported in SAE Paper #2000-01-3017. Boeing Renton has also now put Electroimpact 20,000 RPM electric drilling spindles into five wing riveting machines so now both spindles in the machine are Electroimpact electric spindles. The electric drill spindle features an HSK 40C holder. Both spindles are powered by the same spindle drive which is alternately connected to the drill and then the shave spindle.
Technical Paper

Burr Prevention and Minimization for the Aerospace Industry

1999-06-05
1999-01-2292
Burr research is undeniably highly complex. In order to advance understanding of the process involved several techniques are being implemented. First a detailed and thorough examination of the burr forming process is undertaken. The technique is difficult, intricate and time consuming, but delivers a large amount of vital physical data. This information is then used in the construction of empirical models and, in some case lead to development of FEM models. Finally using the model as a template, related burr formation problems that have not been physically examined can be simulated and the results used to control process planning resulting in the reduction of burr formation. We highlight this process by discussing current areas of research being followed at the University of California in collaboration with Boeing and the Consortium on Deburring and Edge Finishing (CODEF).
Technical Paper

Flexible Assembly System Implementation

1999-10-06
1999-01-3447
This paper covers issues related to the installation, testing, and production implementation of a large-scale automated wing drilling/fastener installation system. Emphasis is placed on describing the production process, foundation requirements, axes alignment, calibration, testing and implementation. Description will include key hardware features such as the multi-function end effector and spindle end effector. The objective is to convey the complexity of implementing this system as well as reviewing the lessons learned from this experience.
Technical Paper

The Automated NC Mini-Driller

1999-10-06
1999-01-3436
The introduction of a new derivative to an existing aircraft model poses many decisions regarding old versus new. In the case of the introduction of the extended range 767 (the 767-400ER), an entirely new wing design prompted the examination of the then current assembly processes and tooling. The hesitation to build new drill templates for use in the traditional method of second stage wing spar assembly inspired Tool Engineering Management to request the investigation of a low cost automated drilling apparatus. As a result, the Boeing Automated Tools Group and Advanced Integration Technology, Inc. (AIT) developed and implemented mobile numerically controlled mini-drilling machines for post-ASAT I assembly-drilling operations.
Technical Paper

Forging the Chain – Considerations for Developing a Supply Chain Strategy

2000-05-16
2000-01-1757
Logistics, information exchange, and people all influence the capability and contribution to profits of the supply chain. Understanding how to analyze the current state, and set a strategy to achieve the desired end state is critical to success in the market place. This paper will focus primarily on the acquisition of components for a manufacturing/assembly operation. However, the principles and processes described can be applied to other segments of the chain, such as from the manufacturer to the customer, or to other components of manufacturing such as maintenance, repair and operating (MRO) supplies.
Technical Paper

Integrated Orbiter/International Space Station Air Quality Analysis for Post-Mission 2A.1 Risk Mitigation

2000-07-10
2000-01-2250
Crewmember ingress of the International Space Station (ISS) before that time accorded by the original ISS assembly sequence, and thus before the ISS capability to adequately control the levels of temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide, poses significant impacts to ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS). Among the most significant considerations necessitated by early ingress are those associated with the capability of the Shuttle Transportation System (STS) Orbiter to control the aforementioned levels, the capability of the ISS to deliver the conditioned air among the ISS elements, and the definition and distribution of crewmember metabolic heat, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. Even under the assumption that all Orbiter and ISS elements would be operating as designed, condensation control and crewmember comfort were paramount issues preceding each of the ISS Missions 2A and 2A.1.
Technical Paper

ISS Launch to Activation EVA Cooperative Design

2000-07-10
2000-01-2441
The design challenges presented by the late evolving International Space Station (ISS) Launch to Activation (LTA) thermal concerns required concerted effort and tradeoffs to be made between affected subsystems. The resulting design and mission planning modifications were made with consideration of thermal, electrical power system and extravehicular activity impacts in mind. It was an excellent exercise in cooperative problem solving that allowed each subsystem visibility into potential impacts of their efforts on other related systems and therefore work towards balanced solutions. It was also an excellent exercise in preparing these subsystems for future quick response cooperative problem solving that will be required to support ISS during its lifetime.
Technical Paper

International Space Station (ISS) Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) Desiccant/Adsorbent Bed (DAB) Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) Redesign

2007-07-09
2007-01-3181
The Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) is a part of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system. The CDRA provides carbon dioxide (CO2) removal from the ISS on-orbit modules. Currently, the CDRA is the secondary removal system on the ISS, with the primary system being the Russian Vozdukh. Within the CDRA are two Desiccant/Adsorbent Beds (DAB), which perform the carbon dioxide removal function. The DAB adsorbent containment approach required improvements with respect to adsorbent containment. These improvements were implemented through a redesign program and have been implemented on units on the ground and returning from orbit. This paper presents a DAB design modification implementation description, a hardware performance comparison between the unmodified and modified DAB configurations, and a description of the modified DAB hardware implementation into the on-orbit CDRA.
Technical Paper

Analysis and Predicted Temperature Control of Crew Quarters added to Node 2 of the International Space Station

2007-07-09
2007-01-3071
Currently scheduled to be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009, Crew Quarters (CQs) will be installed in the Node 2 Module. The CQs provide crewmembers with private space, a place to sleep, and minimal storage. Analysis is to be performed to determine if the United States Operational Segment (USOS) Node 2 can maintain temperature between 47°C and 62°C (65°F and 80°F) [units are CCGS with U.S unit in parenthesis] within the CQ. The analysis will concentrate on the nominal hot environmental case. Environmental heat is due to solar heating of the external shell of the ISS. Configurations including both three and four CQs are examined, as well as multiple configurations of the Low Temperature Loop (LTL) that flows through the Node 2 Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA). This paper describes the analysis performed to determine if Node 2 will be able to maintain cabin temperature between 47°C and 62°C (65°F and 85°F).
Technical Paper

Haptics, Instrumentation, and Simulation: Technologies for Enhanced Hand Drilling Training

1999-06-05
1999-01-2283
A fundamental part of airplane manufacturing involves hand drilling of holes for fasteners (bolts and rivets). The integrity of a fastener depends on the quality of its hole, which must be properly positioned, have a circular diameter of correct dimension, and be free of surface flaws and contaminants. A common method of drilling training is for a student to drill holes under the supervision of an instructor who inspects or measures the holes and makes suggestions for improving technique. This training method has proven to be effective, but it is time-consuming and requires considerable personal attention. We have devised instrumentation to monitor critical parameters (drill orientation and forces) so that a student can receive instantaneous visual feedback. This real-time feedback provides the student a better understanding of the drilling process and allows him or her to quickly make improvements.
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