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Technical Paper

Spot Weld Failure Loads under Combined Mode Loading Conditions

2001-03-05
2001-01-0428
Failure loads of spot welds are investigated under static and impact loading conditions. A test fixture was designed and used to obtain maximum loads of spot welds under a range of combined opening and shear loads with different loading rates. Optical micrographs of the cross sections of spot welds before and after failure were obtained to understand the failure processes under various loading rates and different combinations of loads. The experimental results indicate that under nearly pure opening loads, the failure occurs along the nugget circumferential boundary. Under combined opening and shear loading conditions, the failure starts from the tensile side of the base metal near the nugget in a necking/shear failure mode. The effects of sheet thickness and combined load on the load carrying behavior of spot welds are investigated under static and impact loading conditions based on the experimental results.
Technical Paper

Failure of Laser Welds in Aluminum Sheets

2001-03-05
2001-01-0091
In this paper, the formability of AA5754 aluminum laser-welded blanks produced by Nd:YAG laser welding is investigated under biaxial straining conditions. The mechanical behavior of the laser-welded blanks is first examined by uniaxial tensile tests conducted with the weld line perpendicular to the tensile axis. Shear failure in the weld metal is observed in the experiments. Finite element simulations under generalized plane strain conditions are then conducted in order to further understand the effects of weld geometry and strength on the shear failure and formability of these welded blanks. The strain histories of the material elements in the weld metal obtained from finite element computations are finally used in a theoretical failure analysis based on the material imperfection approach to predict the failure strains for the laser-welded blanks under biaxial straining conditions.
Technical Paper

Impact of Part Variation on In-Process Coordinate Measurements for Automotive Body Assemblies

1998-09-29
982273
Coordinate measurement gages dominate in the area of dimensional control and variation reduction of automotive body assembly processes. However, coordinate measurement gages do not have the capability to track certain measured features. This incapability introduces inherent measurement error created by part (feature) mislocation in constrained non-measured directions. This inherent measurement error weakens the methods used for process control and variation reduction. In this paper, a principle of measurement uncertainty is developed in order to estimate the measurement error caused by this deficiency. The developed principle describes measurement error, which is independent of any other error related to the mechanical or optical coordinate measurement machines (CMMs, OCMMs). Additionally, an error map determined by the measurement uncertainty principle is created for error compensation.
Technical Paper

Piston-Ring Assembly Friction Modeling by Similarity Analysis

1993-03-01
930794
A semi-empirical engine piston/ring assembly friction model based on the concept of the Stribeck diagram and similarity analysis is described. The model was constructed by forming non-dimensional parameters based on design and operating conditions. Friction data collected by the Fixed-Sleeve method described in [1]* at one condition, were used to correlate the coefficient of friction of the assembly and the other non-dimensional parameters. Then, using the instantaneous cylinder pressure as input together with measured and calculated design and operating parameters, reasonable assembly friction and fmep predictions were obtained for a variety of additional conditions, some of which could be compared with experimental values. Model inputs are component dimensions, ring tensions, piston skirt spring constant, piston skirt thermal expansion, engine temperatures, speed, load and oil viscosity.
Technical Paper

Industrial Implementation of Practices for LDH Stability

1993-03-01
930816
The LDH (Limiting Dome Height Test) is widely used at Ford Motor Co. stamping plants laboratories to monitor the formability of incoming sheet materials. Although the LDH test is very easy to implement and interpret, variability of the results and poor reproducibility between laboratories limit its acceptance. In this investigation, some of the causes of variability and differences between plant laboratories are discussed. Much of the experimental work was done at plant laboratories and the results are directly applicable to quality control (QC) machines. It was found that the binder force and the binder shape have a big influence on the results, and they should be carefully controlled. The binder cleaning procedure is also relevant to the test variability. Punch temperature has a much greater influence on QC machines than on research machines and a method for controlling the punch temperature in QC machines is presented.
Technical Paper

Slip Resistance Predictions for Various Metal Step Materials, Shoe Soles and Contaminant Conditions

1987-11-01
872288
The relationship of slip resistance (or coefficient of friction) to safe climbing system maneuvers on high profile vehicles has become an issue because of its possible connection to falls of drivers. To partially address this issue, coefficients of friction were measured for seven of the more popular fabricated metal step materials. Evaluated on these steps were four types of shoe materials (crepe, leather, ribbed-rubber, and oil-resistant-rubber) and three types of contaminant conditions (dry, wet-water, and diesel fuel). The final factor evaluated was the direction of sole force application. Results showed that COF varied primarily as a function of sole material and the presence of contaminants. Unexpectedly, few effects were attributible to the metal step materials. Numerous statistical interactions suggested that adequate levels of COF are more likely to be attained by targeting control on shoe soles and contaminants rather than the choice of a particular step material.
Technical Paper

Effects of Processing Time on Strengths and Failure Modes of Dissimilar 5754/7075 and 7075/5754 Spot Friction Welds in Lap-Shear Specimens

2008-04-14
2008-01-1138
In this investigation, dissimilar 5754/7075 and 7075/5754 spot friction welds were first made under different processing conditions. The spot friction welds in lap-shear specimens were tested under quasi-static loading conditions. The optimal processing times to maximize the failure loads of the 5754/7075 and 7075/5754 welds under lap-shear loading conditions are identified. The maximum failure load of the 7075/5754 welds is about 40% larger than that of the 5754/7075 welds. Optical micrographs of both types of spot friction welds made at different processing times before and after failure are examined. The micrographs show different weld geometries and different failure modes of spot friction welds made at different processing times. The failure modes of the 5754/7075 and 7075/5754 spot friction welds appear to be quite complex and strongly depend on the geometry and the strength of the interfacial surface between the two deformed sheet materials.
Technical Paper

Variation in Autobody Adhesive Curing Process

1999-03-01
1999-01-0997
Adhesive joining is a common autobody subassembly technique especially for outer panels, where visible spot welding is objectionable. To accommodate mass production with the use of certain adhesives very high thermal gradient usually exists, which may result in panel dimensional distortion and variation. The temperature distribution over location and over time are monitored, and its impact to panel dimension is investigated. Experimental results on the effect of the distance between panel and induction coil on the panel temperature is obtained. The thermal induced shape distortion is simulated with a simplified FEA model. The approach to improvement of the induction curing process is discussed.
Technical Paper

Fatigue Failures of Spot Friction Welds in Aluminum 6111-T4 Sheets Under Cyclic Loading Conditions

2006-04-03
2006-01-1207
Fatigue failures of spot friction welds in lap-shear specimens of aluminum 6111-T4 sheets under cyclic loading conditions are investigated in this paper. The paths of fatigue cracks near the spot friction welds are first discussed. A fatigue crack growth model based on the Paris law for crack propagation and the global and local stress intensity factors for kinked cracks is then adopted to predict the fatigue lives of these spot friction welds. The global stress intensity factors and the local stress intensity factors based on the recent published works for resistance spot welds in lap-shear specimens are used to estimate the local stress intensity factors for kinked cracks with experimentally determined kink angles. The results indicate that the fatigue life predictions based on the Paris law and the local stress intensity factors as functions of the kink length agree well with the experimental results.
Technical Paper

Component Mode Synthesis for Substructures with Non-Matching Interfaces

2007-05-15
2007-01-2333
When performing vibration analysis of complex vehicle structures, it is often important to be able to evaluate the effects of design changes in one or more substructures (e.g., for design optimization). It may also be convenient to allow different components to be modeled independently by different groups or organizations. For both cases, it is inevitable that some substructures will have non-matching finite element meshes at the interface where they are physically connected. Thus, a key challenge is to be able to handle the dynamic assembly of components with non-matching meshes and the subsequent global vibration analysis in a systematic and efficient manner. To tackle this problem, the enhancement of component mode synthesis methods for handling finite element models partitioned into non-matching substructures is considered in this paper. Some existing methods are reviewed, and new methods are developed.
Technical Paper

Failure Modeling of Spot Welds Under Complex Combined Loading Conditions for Crash Applications

2002-07-09
2002-01-2032
Experiments to obtain the failure loads of spot welds are first reviewed under combined opening and shear loading conditions. A failure criterion is then presented for spot welds under combined opening and shear loading conditions based on the results from the experiments and a lower bound limit load analysis. In order to account for spot welds under more complex loading conditions, another lower bound limit load solution is presented to characterize the failure loads of spot welds under combinations of three forces and three moments. Based on the limit load solution, an engineering failure criterion is proposed with correction factors determined by different spot weld tests. The engineering failure criterion can be used to characterize the failure loads of spot welds with consideration of the effects of sheet thickness, nugget radius and combinations of loads.
Technical Paper

Model Based Analysis of Performance-Cost Tradeoffs for Engine Manifold Surface Finishing

2004-03-08
2004-01-1561
The link between manufacturing process and product performance is studied in order to construct analytical, quantifiable criteria for the introduction of new engine technologies and processes. Cost associated with a new process must be balanced against increases in engine performance and thus demand for the particular vehicle. In this work, the effect of the Abrasive Flow Machining (AFM) technique on surface roughness is characterized through measurements of specimens, and a predictive engine simulation is used to quantify performance gains due to the new surface finish. Subsequently, economic cost-benefit analysis is used to evaluate manufacturing decisions based on their impact on firm's profitability. A demonstration study examines the use of AFM for finishing the inner surfaces of intake manifolds for two engines, one installed in a compact car and the other in an SUV.
Technical Paper

Influence of Shear Loads on Crush of Honeycomb Materials

2002-03-04
2002-01-0683
We conduct static experiments to investigate the influence of shear stress on the crush behavior of honeycomb materials. The aluminum honeycomb materials selected in this investigation are orthotropic due to their manufacturing processes. A test fixture and honeycomb specimens are designed such that combined compressive and shear loads along the strongest material symmetry axis can be controlled and applied accurately. The experimental results indicate that both the peak and crush strengths under combined compressive and shear loads are lower than those under pure compressive loads. A yield function is suggested for honeycomb materials under the combined loads based on a phenomenological plasticity theory. The microscopic crush mechanism under the combined loads is also investigated. A microscopic crush model based on the experimental observations is developed. The crush model includes the rupture of aluminum cell walls so that the kinematic requirement can be satisfied.
Technical Paper

Modeling and Testing of Spot Welds under Dynamic Impact Loading Conditions

2002-03-04
2002-01-0149
Failure behavior of spot welds is investigated under impact loading conditions. Three different impact speeds were selected to test both HSLA steel and mild steel specimens under combined opening and shear loading conditions. A test fixture was designed and used to obtain the failure loads of spot weld specimens of different thicknesses under a range of combined opening and shear loads with different impact speeds. Accelerometers were installed on the fixtures and the specimens for investigation of the inertia effects. Optical micrographs of the cross sections of failed spot welds were obtained to understand the failure processes in both HSLA steel and mild steel specimens under different combined impact loads. The experimental results indicate that the failure mechanisms of spot welds are very similar for both HSLA steel and mild steel specimens with the same sheet thickness. These micrographs show that the sheet thickness can affect the failure mechanisms.
Technical Paper

An Effective Fatigue Driving Stress for Failure Prediction of Spot Welds Under Cyclic Combined Loading Conditions

2003-03-03
2003-01-0696
An effective fatigue driving stress is proposed to predict the failure of spot welds under cyclic combined loading conditions. The effective fatigue driving stress is obtained based on the Mises yield criterion in terms of the resultant forces and moments in a plastic collapse analysis of spot welds under complex combined loading conditions as discussed in Lin et al. [1]. The effective fatigue driving stress can be used to correlate the fatigue data of spot welds with consideration of the effects of the sheet thickness, nugget diameter and loading conditions. Experimental results for coach-peel and lap-shear specimens under cyclic loading conditions are used to evaluate the applicability of the effective fatigue driving stress. The experimental results for spot welds in both coach-peel and lap-shear specimens are correlated very well based on the effective fatigue driving stress.
Technical Paper

A General Failure Criterion for Spot Welds with Consideration of Plastic Anisotropy and Separation Speed

2003-03-03
2003-01-0611
A general failure criterion for spot welds is proposed with consideration of the plastic anisotropy and the separation speed for crash applications. A lower bound limit load analysis is conducted to account for the failure loads of spot welds under combinations of three forces and three moments. Based on the limit load solution and the experimental results, an engineering failure criterion is proposed with correction factors determined by different spot weld tests. The engineering failure criterion can be used to characterize the failure loads of spot welds with consideration of the effects of the plastic anisotropy, separation speed, sheet thickness, nugget radius and combinations of loads. Spot weld failure loads under uniaxial and biaxial opening loads and those under combined shear and twisting loads from experiments are shown to be characterized well by the engineering failure criterion.
Journal Article

Closed-Form Stress Intensity Factor Solutions for Spot Welds in Various Types of Specimens

2008-04-14
2008-01-1141
Closed-form stress intensity factor solutions at the critical locations of spot welds in four types of commonly used specimens are obtained based on elasticity theories and fracture mechanics. The loading conditions for spot welds in the central parts of four types of specimens are first examined. The resultant loads on the weld nugget and the self-balanced resultant loads on the lateral surface of the central parts of the specimens are then decomposed into various types of symmetric and anti-symmetric parts. Closed-form structural stress and stress intensity factor solutions for spot welds under various types of loading conditions are then adopted from a recent work of Lin and Pan to derive new closed-form stress intensity factor solutions at the critical locations of spot welds in the four types of specimens.
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