Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 3 of 3
Technical Paper

Analysis of Causes of Rear-end Conflicts Using Naturalistic Driving Data Collected by Video Drive Recorders

2008-04-14
2008-01-0522
Studying traffic accidents by using naturalistic driving data has become increasingly appealing for its potential benefits in improving road safety. This paper presents findings from a field test which has been conducted on 50 taxis in the urban areas of Beijing for 10 months using Video Drive Recorders (VDRs). The VDR used in this study could record the information of vehicle front view video, vehicle states, as well as driver operations immediately before and after an event. The drivers were given no specific instructions during the test, and the instrumentation for data collection was unobtrusive. Important safety-relevant parameters, such as vehicle speed, pre-event maneuver, time headway, time-to-collision, and driver reaction time, were calculated with precision. Based on these parameters, an analysis into features and causes of rear-end conflicts is performed.
Technical Paper

Effects of Sinusoidal Whole Body Vibration Frequency on Drivers' Muscle Responses

2015-04-14
2015-01-1396
Low back pain has a higher prevalence among drivers who have long term history of vehicle operations. Vehicle vibration has been considered to contribute to the onset of low back pain. However, the fundamental mechanism that relates vibration to low back pain is still not clear. Little is known about the relationship between vibration exposure, the biomechanical response, and the physiological responses of the seated human. The aim of this study was to determine the vibration frequency that causes the increase of muscle activity that can lead to muscle fatigue and low back pain. This study investigated the effects of various vibration frequencies on the lumbar and thoracic paraspinal muscle responses among 11 seated volunteers exposed to sinusoidal whole body vibration varying from 4Hz to 30Hz at 0.4 g of acceleration. The accelerations of the seat and the pelvis were recorded during various frequency of vibrations. Muscle activity was measured using electromyography (EMG).
Technical Paper

Effects of Human Adaptation and Trust on Shared Control for Driver-Automation Cooperative Driving

2017-09-23
2017-01-1987
Vehicle automation is a fundamental approach to reduce traffic accidents and driver workload. However, there is a notable risk of pushing human drivers out of the control loop before automation technology fully matures. Cooperative driving (or vehicle co-piloting) is a novel paradigm which is defined as the vehicle being jointly navigated by a human driver and an automatic controller through shared control technology. Indirect shared control is an emerging shared control method, which is able to realize cooperative driving through input complementation instead of haptic guidance. In this paper we first establish an indirect shared control method, in which the driver’s commanded input and the controller’s desired input are balanced with a weighted summation. Thereafter, we propose a predictive model to capture driver adaptation and trust in indirect shared control.
X