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Technical Paper

Development and Validation of a Computational Process for Pass-By Noise Simulation

2001-04-30
2001-01-1561
The Indirect Boundary Element Analysis is employed for developing a computational pass-by noise simulation capability. An inverse analysis algorithm is developed in order to generate the definition of the main noise sources in the numerical model. The individual source models are combined for developing a system model for pass-by noise simulation. The developed numerical techniques are validated through comparison between numerical results and test data for component level and system level analyses. Specifically, the source definition capability is validated by comparing the actual and the computationally reconstructed acoustic field for an engine intake manifold. The overall pass-by noise simulation capability is validated by computing the maximum overall sound pressure level for a vehicle under two separate driving conditions.
Technical Paper

Oil Film Dynamic Characteristics for Journal Bearing Elastohydrodynamic Analysis Based on a Finite Difference Formulation

2003-05-05
2003-01-1669
A fast and accurate journal bearing elastohydrodynamic analysis is presented based on a finite difference formulation. The governing equations for the oil film pressure, stiffness and damping are solved using a finite difference approach. The oil film domain is discretized using a rectangular two-dimensional finite difference mesh. In this new formulation, it is not necessary to generate a global fluidity matrix similar to a finite element based solution. The finite difference equations are solved using a successive over relaxation (SOR) algorithm. The concept of “Influence Zone,” for computing the dynamic characteristics is introduced. The SOR algorithm and the “Influence Zone” concept significantly improve the computational efficiency without loss of accuracy. The new algorithms are validated with numerical results from the literature and their numerical efficiency is demonstrated.
Technical Paper

Life Cycle Assessment and Design of Instrument Panels: A Common Sense Approach

1997-02-24
970695
The U.S. EPA initiated the Common Sense Initiative (CSI) to develop “Cleaner, Cheaper, Smarter” environmental policy and management practices. This paper addresses the application of life cycle design and assessment tools to automotive instrument panels (IP) as part of the Automotive Manufacturing Sector CSI pilot project investigation. For this study, an “average IP” was modeled based on the instrument panels of three mid-sized U.S. car models: 1995 Chevrolet Lumina, 1996 Dodge Intrepid and 1996 Ford Taurus. This “average IP” consisted of seventeen different materials and weighed over 22 kg (49 lbs.). A life cycle inventory analysis was conducted to evaluate the environmental burdens associated with materials production, manufacturing, use, and retirement. A thorough evaluation of solid waste production and energy consumption was completed and partial inventories of air emission and water effluent releases were also conducted.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Heat Release Rate Analysis of a Diesel Engine Operating Under Steady State Conditions

1997-02-24
970889
An experimental heat release rate analysis was conducted on a six cylinder, 12.7 liter Detroit Diesel Series 60 turbocharged engine operating under steady state conditions. The overall chemical, or gross, rate of heat release and the net apparent rate of heat release were determined from experimental measurements. The gross, time averaged, heat release rate was determined by two separate concepts/methods using exhaust gas concentration measurements from the Nicolet Rega 7000 Real Time Exhaust Gas Analyzer and the measured exhaust gas flow rate. The net apparent rate of heat release was determined from the in-cylinder pressure measurements for each of the six cylinders, averaged over 80 cycles. These pressure measurements were obtained using a VXI based Tektronix data acquisition system and LabVIEW software. A computer algorithm then computed the net apparent rate of heat release from the averaged in-cylinder pressure measurements.
Technical Paper

Development of Second-by-Second Fuel Use and Emissions Models Based on an Early 1990s Composite Car

1997-02-24
971010
Simulation models for second-by-second fuel rate, and engine-out and tailpipe emissions of CO, HC, and NOx from a “composite” car in hot engine and catalyst conditions are presented and tested using Federal Test Procedure Revision Project (FTPRP) data from 15 1991-1994 cars. The models are constructed as a combination of simple science and curve fitting to the FTPRP data. The models are preliminary, the simplest models being presented to illustrate how much can be predicted with very few parameters. Fuel rate and engine out emissions of all three pollutants are accurately predicted. The tailpipe emissions models are only moderately successful, largely because we are only moderately successful in predicting catalyst pass fractions during low power driving. Nevertheless, the composite car shows regular emissions behavior, and these are modeled effectively.
Technical Paper

Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Plastic and Steel Vehicle Fuel Tanks

1998-11-30
982224
Federal standards that mandate improved fuel economy have resulted in the increased use of lightweight materials in automotive applications. However, the environmental burdens associated with a product extend well beyond the use phase. Life cycle assessment is the science of determining the environmental burdens associated with the entire life cycle of a given product from cradle-to-grave. This report documents the environmental burdens associated with every phase of the life cycle of two fuel tanks utilized in full-sized 1996 GM vans. These vans are manufactured in two configurations, one which utilizes a steel fuel tank, and the other a multi-layered plastic fuel tank consisting primarily of high density polyethylene (HDPE). This study was a collaborative effort between GM and the University of Michigan's National Pollution Prevention Center, which received funding from EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Investigation of Lubricant/Main Shaft Interaction and Dryout in an Automatic Transmission Model

1998-05-04
981447
When unexpected integrated lubricant-related problems occur, for example, high-speed operating conditions, lubricants can be degraded and even fail to reach certain automatic transmission parts. Dryout of oil films means a serious lack of lubrication, which may damage the power transmission line and key parts. Dryout of ATF is analogous to that in forced convective boiling and condensation. It thus requires special efforts to determine the mechanics that induce such fluid transport phenomena. This paper presents an experimental investigation of lubricant activities in the main shaft. Dimensional analysis is applied, and flow maps of the air-oil flow and dryout regimes are constructed. Correlations closely agree with the data and reveal the possibility of dryout. Heat transfer effect is briefly discussed.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Investigation of Transient Heat Losses to Tank Wall During the Inflator Tank Test

1998-09-29
982326
A series of inflator tank tests was carried out to determine the amount of transient heat losses to the tank wall during these tests. The time history data of tank wall temperature, and tank interior gas temperature and pressure, were measured. The tank wall temperature data were analyzed using an inverse heat conduction method to generate the transient heat loss fluxes from the tank gas to the tank wall. The validity of the results are discussed along with the physical reasoning and experimental observations. This is the first part of an effort in a research project to develop a comprehensive heat transfer model to predict the transient heat losses to the tank wall during the inflator tank test.
Technical Paper

Emissions Analysis of Small Utility Engines

1995-09-01
952080
As the federal regulations of on-road engine exhaust emissions become more and more stringent, the exhaust emissions of small utility engines are now under close study and are becoming subject to federal regulations. This paper reports the on-going research on emissions and test procedures for small utility engines at the University of Michigan. A group of small utility engines, selected by the National Fuels and Emissions Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), were tested at various air/fuel ratios under steady state and transient operation. Mass rate of emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), total hydrocarbons (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) were measured using dilute sampling. The lean operation limit of some engines was studied to find a compromise among emissions, engine power, and engine life. Experimental research was also undertaken to study emission control techniques; such as catalytic conversion, air injection, and fuel injection.
Technical Paper

The Potential of the Variable Stroke Spark-Ignition Engine

1997-02-24
970067
A comprehensive quasi-dimensional computer simulation of the spark-ignition (SI) engine was used to explore part-load, fuel economy benefits of the Variable Stroke Engine (VSE) compared to the conventional throttled engine. First it was shown that varying stroke can replace conventional throttling to control engine load, without changing the engine characteristics. Subsequently, the effects of varying stroke on turbulence, burn rate, heat transfer, and pumping and friction losses were revealed. Finally these relationships were used to explain the behavior of the VSE as stroke is reduced. Under part load operation, it was shown that the VSE concept can improve brake specific fuel consumption by 18% to 21% for speeds ranging from 1500 to 3000 rpm. Further, at part load, NOx was reduced by up to 33%. Overall, this study provides insight into changes in processes within and outside the combustion chamber that cause the benefits and limitations of the VSE concept.
Technical Paper

One-Dimensional Transient Dynamics of Fuel Evaporation and Diffusion in Induction Systems

1997-02-24
970058
Engine performance under transients is greatly affected by the fuel behavior in the induction systems. To better understand the fuel behavior, a computer model has been developed to study the one-dimensional coupled heat and mass transfer processes occurring during the transient evaporation of liquid fuel from a heated surface into stagnant air. The energy and mass diffusion equations are solved simultaneously to yield the transient temperatures and species concentrations using a modified finite difference technique. The numerical technique is capable of solving the coupled equations while simultaneously tracking the movement of the evaporation interface. Evaporation results are presented for various initial film thicknesses representing typical puddle thicknesses for multi-point fuel injection systems using heptane, octane, and nonane pure hydrocarbon fuels.
Technical Paper

Determination of Coastdown Mechanical Loss Ambient Correction Factors for use with J2263 Road Tests

1997-02-24
970269
Testing for vehicle emissions and fuel economy certification occurs primarily on chassis dynamometers in a laboratory setting and therefore the actual road conditions, such as forces due to tire rolling resistance and internal friction, must be simulated. Test track coastdown procedures measure vehicle road load forces and produce an equation which relates these forces to velocity. The recent inclusion of onboard anemometry has allowed the coastdown procedure to account for varying wind effects; however, the new anemometer based mechanical loss coefficients do not take into account ambient weather conditions. The two purposes of this study are (1) to determine the new tire rolling resistance temperature correction coefficient that should be used when test ambient temperature is different from the standard reference value of 68°F, and (2) to investigate the effects of auxiliary measurements, such as other ambient conditions and vehicle settings, on this correction coefficient.
Technical Paper

Emissions from Modern Passenger Cars with Malfunctioning Emissions Controls

1996-02-01
960067
Malfunctioning emission controls continue to be a major source of emissions from in-use vehicles. We analyze two sources of data on cars with malfunctioning emissions controls: remote sensing surveys and dynamometer tests of cars in the condition they were received. Our analysis indicates that roughly 8 percent of relatively new (2- to 5-year old), modern technology (fuel-injected) cars have malfunctioning emission controls. There is a wide range in the probability of malfunction of specific models, from zero to over 20 percent. Possible causes of high model-specific malfunction probability are poor initial design and/or manufacture.
Technical Paper

Off-Cycle Exhaust Emissions from Modern Passenger Cars with Properly-Functioning Emissions Controls

1996-02-01
960064
Real-world tailpipe emissions from properly-functioning, model year 1991-94 conventional gasoline-fueled cars associated with vehicle operations not emphasized in the FTP are analyzed. Tailpipe emissions are expressed as the product of three factors: fuel rate, engine-out emissions index, and catalyst pass fraction, which are modeled using empirical data from the FTP-Revision Project and applied to in-use driving survey data to estimate real-world emissions. Average tailpipe emissions due to fuel enrichment in warmed-up vehicles are estimated to be 8 g/mile for CO, and 0.3 g/mile for HC. For NOx, the contribution due to incremental loads on the engine (i.e. air conditioner, grade, high acceleration, and high speed) that are not accounted for in the FTP but are encountered in real-world driving are estimated to be roughly 0.3 g/mile.
Technical Paper

An Evaluation of Airbag Tank-Test Results

1998-02-23
980864
The evaluation of the performance of a particular inflator for the design of the entire airbag system is typically carried out by examining the pressure pattern in a standard tank test. This study assesses the adequacy of the tank test as a true measure of the likely performance of the actual inflator-airbag system. Theoretical arguments, numerical experiments, and physical experiments show that the time rate of pressure change may be an appropriate measure to evaluate performance of a specific type of inflator, particularly if variations in the inflator design maintain the same working gas components. However, when evaluating and comparing the dynamic behavior between different types of inflators, the time rate of pressure change provides useful but incomplete information.
Technical Paper

Measured Emissions of Small Engines under Steady State and Transient Operation

1994-09-01
941806
The exhaust emissions of off-road and utility engines have recently come under increasingly thorough scrutiny and are now becoming the subject of federal regulations. While the most straightforward emissions guidelines relate to steady-state engine performance, it is well known that duty cycles of many small engines have a transient content and that its significance can vary strongly from application to application. Hence, it is important to examine how measured emissions change when the transient content of a test cycle is varied, and what kinds of steady-state and transient test cycles might realistically imitate operational conditions. These questions have been addressed in an experimental study in which several small two- and four-stroke engines have been tested under steady state and transient cycles. The same tests were also carried out when these engines had been adjusted to operate at leaner air-fuel ratios, as might be required by forthcoming regulations.
Technical Paper

Automotive Demand, Markets, and Material Selection Processes

1994-03-01
940701
Cost reduction, quality improvement, and regulatory compliance are well-recognized competitive issues. Companies must excel along each of these fronts while operating in an environment of rapid and multi-faceted change, limited financial and human capital, and increasing product development time pressure. In addition, consumers are demanding automobiles that provide greater performance, function, and comfort while emitting lower emissions, consuming fewer gallons of gasoline, injuring fewer humans, and requiring fewer dollars to build and purchase. A solution to these seemingly conflicting objectives is to take a systems view of the product and industry. This paper explores the material decision process so that manufacturers, component suppliers, and material providers may better understand the interlocking web of compromises that shape the pursuit of value-added alternatives and avoidance of unprofitable compromises.
Technical Paper

Life Cycle Assessment of a Transmission Case: Magnesium vs. Aluminum

1998-02-23
980470
This paper describes a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) done to evaluate the relative environmental performance of magnesium (Mg) and aluminum (Al) automatic transmission cases. Magnesium is considered a lighter weight substitute for aluminum in this application. Light weighting of vehicles increases fuel economy and is an important vehicle design metric. The objective of this LCA is to quantify energy and other environmental trade-offs associated with each alternative for material production, manufacturing, use, and end-of-life management stages. Key features of the inventory modeling and the data collection and analysis methods are included in this paper along with life cycle inventory profiles of aluminum and magnesium alternatives. The life cycle inventory (LCI) was interpreted using a set of environmental metrics and areas needing further research were identified. A qualitative cost assessment was done in conjunction with this LCA to highlight potential cost drivers.
Technical Paper

Fuel Economy and Power Benefits of Cetane-Improved Fuels in Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

1997-10-01
972900
A program to explore the effects of natural and additive-derived cetane on various aspects of diesel performance and combustion has been carried out. Procedures have been developed to measure diesel engine fuel consumption and power to a high degree of precision. These methods have been used to measure fuel consumption and power in three heavy-duty direct-injection diesel engines. The fuel matrix consisted of three commercial fuels of cetane number (CN) of 40-42, the same fuels raised to CN 48-50 with a cetane improver additive, and three commercial fuels of base CN 47-50. The engines came from three different U.S. manufacturers and were of three different model years and emissions configurations. Both fuel economy and power were found to be significantly higher for the cetane-improved fuels than for the naturally high cetane fuels. These performance advantages derive mainly from the higher volumetric heat content inherent to the cetane-improved fuels.
Technical Paper

Mixture Motion - Its Effect on Pressure Rise in a Combustion Bomb: A New Look at Cyclic Variation

1968-02-01
680766
Cycle-to-cycle variation of pressure is a common problem in all spark-ignition engines. To examine the suspected influence of mixture-motion on this variation, a study was performed in a constant volume cylindrical bomb in which a jet of propane-air mixture was directed at the initial flame kernel. The rate of pressure rise of the jet-influenced combustion was compared to the rate for combustion in a quiescent mixture. The flame area, obtained using a spark schlieren photographic technique, and the calculated combustion rate were correlated with the pressure rate. The major results were: the rate of pressure rise increased approximately linearly with mixture jet velocity; and the width of the mixture-jet had an effect on the rate of pressure rise. A jet profile width slightly greather than the spark-gap produced the highest rate of pressure rise.
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