Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Affiliation

Search Results

Technical Paper

Fatigue Testing of Sheet Metals Subject to Uniaxial Tension-Compression

2001-03-05
2001-01-1321
The paper describes the fabrication and testing of thin sheet metal uniaxial fatigue specimens that have been laminated to prevent buckling. When hot or cold rolled metal thicknesses are below 5 mm, the usual fatigue specimens, having a uniform gauge length of 7.5 mm or more, buckle in the short life region (∼10000 cycles) of strain-life testing. For thinner materials, non-standard specimen designs or anti-buckling guides have been used, but each of these solutions requires additional instrumentation. The results presented in this paper show that laminating multiple sheets of material together to increase the specimen's effective thickness raises the strain level for the onset of buckling of the standard uniaxial specimen. Constant and variable amplitude fatigue tests extending into the high-strain short-life region were performed. Fatigue life data for multiple layer specimens were in good agreement with those obtained for single layer specimens.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Small Scale Formability Results on Large Scale Parts: Aluminum Alloy Tailor Welded Blanks

2001-03-05
2001-01-0823
This paper investigates the application of standard formability testing results for aluminum alloy tailor welded blanks (TWB) to full size stampings. The limit strains obtained from formability testing are compared to measured strains in a larger scale part. The measured strains in the full scale part are also compared to predictions from finite element simulation.
Technical Paper

Simulation of Electromagnetic Forming of Aluminum Alloy Sheet

2001-03-05
2001-01-0824
Electromagnetic forming of aluminum alloys provides improved forming limits, minimal springback and rapid implementation. The ability to predict the minimum energy required in electromagnetic forming is essential in developing an efficient process. Understanding the development of the strain distribution over time in the blank is also highly desired. A numerical model is needed that offers insight into these areas and the electromagnetic forming process in general that cannot easily be extracted from experiments. To address these concerns, ANSYS/EMAG is used to model the time varying currents that are discharged through the coil in order to obtain the transient magnetic forces acting on the blank. The body forces caused by electromagnetic induction are then used as the boundary condition to model the high velocity deformation of the blank with LS-DYNA, an explicit dynamic finite element code.
Technical Paper

Dent Resistance of Medium Scale Aluminum Structural Assemblies

2001-03-05
2001-01-0757
This work outlines the evaluation of static and dynamic dent resistance of medium scale structural assemblies fabricated using AA6111 and AA5754. The assemblies fabricated attempt to mimic common automotive hood designs allowing for a parametric study of the support spacing, sheet thickness and panel curvature. Closure panels of AA6111, of two thicknesses (0.8, and 0.9mm), are bonded to re-usable inner panels fabricated using AA5754 to form the structural assemblies tested. While normal practice would use the same alloy for both the inner and the outer, in the current work, AA5754 was adopted for ease of welding. Numerical simulations were performed using LS DYNA. A comparison of experimental and numerically simulated results is presented. The study attempts to establish an understanding of the relationship between structural support conditions and resulting dent depths for both static and dynamic loading conditions.
Technical Paper

Weld Failure in Formability Testing of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks

2001-03-05
2001-01-0090
The present work investigates weld failure modes during formability tests of multi-gauge aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks (TWBs). The limiting dome height test is used to evaluate formability of TWBs. Three gauge combinations utilizing aluminum alloy 5754 sheets are considered (2 to 1 mm, 1.6 to 1 mm and 2 to 1.6 mm). Three weld orientations have been considered: transverse, longitudinal and 45°. Interaction of several factors determines the type of failure that occurs in a TWB specimen. These factors are weld orientation, morphology and distribution of weld defects, and the magnitude of constraint imposed by the thicker sheet to the thin sheet. The last factor depends on the difference in thickness of the sheet pair and is usually expressed in terms of gauge ratio. In general TWBs show two different types of fracture: weld failure and failure of the thin aluminum sheet. Only the former will be discussed in this paper.
Technical Paper

Modelling Diesel Engine Natural Gas Injection: Injector/Cylinder Boundary Conditions

1994-03-01
940329
Direct injected natural gas diesel engines are currently being developed. Numerical analyses results are presented for 20.0 MPa (≈ 3000 psia; 200 atm), 444 K, natural gas injection into 4.0 MPa cylinder air where the ambient turbulence field is representative of diesel engines. Two very important non-intuitive, observations are made. First, the seemingly reasonable spatially uniform velocity profile currently used at the injector exit is not appropriate, rather a double-hump profile is correct. Second, a spatially uniform, injector exit, temperature profile results in local temperature overestimates as large as 300 K. Considering the strong role of temperature on chemical kinetics, this second observation may have profound implications on the validity of conclusions reached using uniform exit profiles.
Technical Paper

A Statistical Method for Damage Detection in Hydraulic Components

1995-09-01
952089
The detection and tracking of the damage process between surfaces in contact, together with an estimation of the remaining service life, are significant contributions to the efficient operation of hydraulic components. The commonly used approach of analyzing vibration signals in terms of spectral distributions, while being very effective, has some shortcomings. For example, the results are sensitive to both load and speed variations. The approach presented in this paper is based on the fact that the asperity distribution of surfaces in good condition have a near normal probability distribution. Deviation from this can be tracked using statistical moments. The Beta probability distribution provides a number of shapes, including normal, under the control of two positive numbers, α and β. Unlike the normal distribution, which indicates defects by kurtosis values higher than 3.0, the Beta distribution provides more flexibility.
Technical Paper

1997 Propane Vehicle Challenge Design Strategy -University of Waterloo

1998-02-23
980491
The conversion design strategy, and emissions and performance results for a dedicated propane, vapour injected, 1995 Dodge Dakota truck are reported. Data is obtained from the University of Waterloo entry in the 1997 Propane Vehicle Challenge. A key feature of the design strategy is its focus on testing and emissions while preserving low engine speed power for drivability. Major changes to the Dakota truck included the following: installation of a custom shaped fuel tank, inclusion of a fuel temperature control module, addition of a vaporizer and a fuel delivery metering unit, installation of a custom vapour distribution manifold, addition of an equivalence ratio electronic controller, inclusion of a wide range oxygen sensor, addition of an exhaust gas recirculation cooler and installation of thermal insulation on the exhaust system. A competition provided natural gas catalyst was used.
Technical Paper

Effects of Bead Surface Preparation on Friction in the Drawbead Test

1991-02-01
910511
The effects of bead surface roughness on friction, die pickup, and sheet surface damage in the drawbead test were investigated. Beads of HRC 58 hardness were prepared from centerless-ground rod by circumferential honing to 0.05 μm roughness, followed by finishing with 100, 400, or 600 grit SiC paper in the axial direction. Paraffinic base oils with viscosities of 4.5, 30, and 285 mm2/s were used neat and in conjunction with stearic acid. The effects of bead roughness depended on the nature of metal transfer, especially its distribution and firmness of attachment. The presence of a boundary additive increased, decreased, or had no effect on friction depending on the particular coating and bead finish.
Technical Paper

Report of NADDRG Friction Committee on Reproducibility of Friction Tests within and Between Laboratories

1993-03-01
930811
The present paper offers a status report on round-robin tests conducted with the participation of ten laboratories, with drawbead simulation (DBS) as the test method. The results showed that, in most laboratories, the coefficient of friction (COF) derived from the test is repeatable within an acceptable range of ±0.01. Repeatability between laboratories was less satisfactory. Five laboratories reported results within the desirable band, while some laboratories found consistently higher values. In one instance this could be traced to incomplete transfer of clamp forces to the load cell, in other instances inaccurate test geometry is suspected. Therefore, numerical values of COF from different laboratories are not necessarily comparable. Irrespective of these inter-laboratory variations, the relative ranking of lubricants was not affected, and data generated within one laboratory can be used for relative evaluations and for a resolution of production problems.
Technical Paper

Fatigue Evaluation of a Nodular Cast Iron Component

1992-02-01
920669
A ferritic-pearlitic nodular iron automobile suspension knuckle was fatigue tested in the laboratory using a constant amplitude load level that simulated a severe service condition. It was found that cracks always initiated from surface casting defects and that the fatigue life could be extended significantly by machining away the as-cast surface in the fatigue sensitive locations. Both local strain and fracture mechanics approaches were used successfully to predict the fatigue life of the component.
Technical Paper

The Effect of Nitrogen on the Mechanical Properties of an SAE 1045 Steel

1992-02-01
920667
A cold worked and induction hardened SAE1045 steel component exhibited excessive distortion after cold working and straightening, as well as cracking during straightening after induction hardening. Since the problems occurred only in certain heats of electric furnace (EF) steel, in which nitrogen content can vary widely and in some cases be quite high, and never occurred for basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel for which nitrogen contents are uniformly low it was suspected that the source of the problem was low temperature nitrogen strain aging in heats of EF steel with a high nitrogen content. The measured distortion and mechanical properties at various stages in the fabrication process showed that while nitrogen content had no significant effect on the hot rolled steel the component distortion and strength after cold working and after induction hardening increased with increasing nitrogen content.
Technical Paper

Effect of Bead Finish Orientation on Friction and Galling in the Drawbead Test

1992-02-01
920632
This study was undertaken to examine the role of tool finish orientation on the drawing of zinc-coated steel sheets. Beads of average roughnesses of 0.1 μm and 0.2 μm, finished parallel to and perpendicular to sliding, were used in the drawbead test. Lubrication was provided by unblended base oils of 4.5, 30, and 285 mm2/s @ 40°C, used neat and with a boundary additive, 1% stearic acid. Three types of coated sheet (galvannealed, electrogalvanized, and hot-dip galvanized) were compared to bare AKDQ steel sheet. Results show that lubricant viscosity had the greatest effect on friction, while bead finish orientation and coating type influenced the nature of metal transfer and the galling of the strip. Mixed-film lubrication dominated with the medium and heavy lubricants, here contact area and friction were reduced with increasing lubricant viscosity.
Technical Paper

Transient Tribological Phenomena in Drawbead Simulation

1992-02-01
920634
Details of the development of metal transfer and friction were studied by drawing cold-rolled bare, galvannealed, electrogalvanized, and hot-dip galvanized strips with a mineral-oil lubricant of 30 cSt viscosity at 40 C, over a total distance of 2500 mm by three methods. An initial high friction peak was associated with metal transfer to the beads and was largest with pure zinc and smallest with Fe-Zn coatings. Insertion of a new strip disturbed the coating and led to the development of secondary peaks. Long-term trends were governed by the stability of the coating. Stearic acid added to mineral oil delayed stabilization of the coating and increased contact area and thus friction with pure zinc surfaces. The usual practice of reporting average friction values can hide valuable information on lubrication mechanisms and metal transfer.
Technical Paper

Tribological Factors Affecting the LDH Test

1992-02-01
920434
The present work is aimed at investigating the tribological factors influencing the LDH test. The material used was AKDQ cold-rolled bare steel, 0.82mm thick. The investigated factors included: test speed (0.833, 4.167, 6.667, and 8.333 mm/s), lubricant viscosity (4.5, 7.0, and 12.5 mm2/s), punch roughness (0.033 and 0.144 μm Ra), and test temperature (25 and 50 °C). Test speed and lubricant viscosity form a variation of the numerator of the Stribeck curve's x-axis (ηV). With ηV increasing from 4 to 120 mm3/s2 friction decreased, resulting in a 0.5 mm higher LDH. Increasing the punch roughness decreased friction producing an increase of 0.25 mm in the LDH. There appears to be an optimum roughness -- at which the roughness features act as lubricant reservoirs but the asperities do not break through the lubricant film -- resulting in minimum friction, therefore, maximum LDH.
Technical Paper

Measurement of Temperature Gradient (dT/dy) and Temperature Response (dT/dt) of a Prismatic Lithium-Ion Pouch Cell with LiFePO4 Cathode Material

2017-03-28
2017-01-1207
Lithium-ion batteries, which are nowadays common in laptops, cell phones, toys, and other portable electronic devices, are also viewed as a most promising advanced technology for electric and hybrid electric vehicles (EVs and HEVs), but battery manufacturers and automakers must understand the performance of these batteries when they are scaled up to the large sizes needed for the propulsion of the vehicle. In addition, accurate thermo-physical property input is crucial to thermal modeling. Therefore, a designer must study the thermal characteristics of batteries for improvement in the design of a thermal management system and also for thermal modeling. This work presents a purely experimental thermal characterization in terms of measurement of the temperature gradient and temperature response of a lithium-ion battery utilizing a promising electrode material, LiFePO4, in a prismatic pouch configuration.
Technical Paper

Extended Range Electric Vehicle Powertrain Simulation, and Comparison with Consideration of Fuel Cell and Metal-Air Battery

2017-03-28
2017-01-1258
The automobile industry has been undergoing a transition from fossil fuels to a low emission platform due to stricter environmental policies and energy security considerations. Electric vehicles, powered by lithium-ion batteries, have started to attain a noticeable market share recently due to their stable performance and maturity as a technology. However, electric vehicles continue to suffer from two disadvantages that have limited widespread adoption: charging time and energy density. To mitigate these challenges, vehicle Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) have developed different vehicle architectures to extend the vehicle range. This work seeks to compare various powertrains, including: combined power battery electric vehicles (BEV) (zinc-air and lithium-ion battery), zero emission fuel cell vehicles (FCV)), conventional gasoline powered vehicles (baseline internal combustion vehicle), and ICE engine extended range hybrid electric vehicle.
Journal Article

Longitudinal Vehicle Dynamics Modeling and Parameter Estimation for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle

2017-03-28
2017-01-1574
System identification is an important aspect in model-based control design which is proven to be a cost-effective and time saving approach to improve the performance of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). This study focuses on modeling and parameter estimation of the longitudinal vehicle dynamics for Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) with power-split architecture. This model is needed to develop and evaluate various controllers, such as energy management system, adaptive cruise control, traction and driveline oscillation control. Particular emphasis is given to the driveline oscillations caused due to low damping present in PHEVs by incorporating flexibility in the half shaft and time lag in the tire model.
Technical Paper

An Analysis of ISO 26262: Machine Learning and Safety in Automotive Software

2018-04-03
2018-01-1075
Machine learning (ML) plays an ever-increasing role in advanced automotive functionality for driver assistance and autonomous operation; however, its adequacy from the perspective of safety certification remains controversial. In this paper, we analyze the impacts that the use of ML within software has on the ISO 26262 safety lifecycle and ask what could be done to address them. We then provide a set of recommendations on how to adapt the standard to better accommodate ML.
Technical Paper

Design Optimization of the Transmission System for Electric Vehicles Considering the Dynamic Efficiency of the Regenerative Brake

2018-04-03
2018-01-0819
In this paper, gear ratios of a two-speed transmission system are optimized for an electric passenger car. Quasi static system models, including the vehicle model, the motor, the battery, the transmission system, and drive cycles are established in MATLAB/Simulink at first. Specifically, since the regenerative braking capability of the motor is affected by the SoC of battery and motors torque limitation in real time, the dynamical variation of the regenerative brake efficiency is considered in this study. To obtain the optimal gear ratios, iterations are carried out through Nelder-Mead algorithm under constraints in MATLAB/Simulink. During the optimization process, the motor efficiency is observed along with the drive cycle, and the gear shift strategy is determined based on the vehicle velocity and acceleration demand. Simulation results show that the electric motor works in a relative high efficiency range during the whole drive cycle.
X