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Technical Paper

Wear and Galvanic Corrosion Protection of Mg alloy via Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Process for Mg Engine Application

2009-04-20
2009-01-0790
Sliding wear of magnesium (Mg) engine cylinder bore surfaces and corrosion of Mg engine coolant channels are the two unsolved critical issues that automakers have to deal with in development of magnesium-intensive engines. In this paper, Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) process was used to produce oxide coatings on AJ62 Mg alloy to provide wear and corrosion protection. In order to optimize the PEO process, orthogonal experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of PEO process parameters on the wear properties of PEO coatings. The PEO coatings showed a much better wear resistance, as well as a smaller friction coefficient, than the AJ62 substrate. The galvanic corrosion property of AJ62 Mg coupled with stainless steel and aluminum (Al) was investigated via immersion corrosion test in an engine coolant. Applying PEO coating on Mg can effectively prevent the galvanic corrosion attack to Mg.
Technical Paper

Surface Effect of a PEO Coating on Friction at Different Sliding Velocities

2015-04-14
2015-01-0687
In order to reduce the weight of an automotive engine, an aluminum (Al) alloy engine block with cast iron liner has been successfully used to replace the gray cast iron engine. For newly emerging Al linerless engine in which the low surface hardness of the aluminum alloy has to be overcome, a few surface processing technologies are used to protect the surface of cylinders. Among them, plasma transferred wire arc (PTWA) thermal spraying coating is becoming popular. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating is also proposed for increasing the wear resistance of aluminum alloy and reducing the friction between the cylinder and piston. In this work, a PEO coating with a thickness of ∼20 μm was prepared, and a high speed pin-on-disc tribometer was used to study the tribological behavior of the coating at oil lubricant conditions. Different surface roughness of the coating and a large range of the sliding speeds were employed for the tests.
Technical Paper

General and Galvanic Corrosion Behavior of Aluminized Ultra-High Strength Steel (UHSS) and Magnesium Alloy AZ35 Altered by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coating Processes

2017-03-28
2017-01-0506
Ultra-high strength steel (UHSS) and magnesium (Mg) alloy have found their importance in response to automotive strategy of light weighting. UHSS to be metal-formed by hot stamping usually has a hot-dipped aluminum-silicon alloy layer on its surface to prevent the high temperature scaling during the hot stamping and corrosion during applications. In this paper, a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process was used to produce ceramic oxide coatings on aluminized UHSS and Mg with intention to further improve their corrosion resistances. A potentiodynamic polarization corrosion test was employed to evaluate general corrosion properties of the individual alloys. Galvanic corrosion of the aluminized UHSS and magnesium alloy coupling with and without PEO coatings was studied by a zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) test. It was found that the heating-cooling process simulating the hot stamping would reduce anti-corrosion properties of aluminized UHSS due to the outward iron diffusion.
Technical Paper

Energy Efficiency Analysis of Active-flow Operations in Diesel Engine Aftertreatment

2006-10-16
2006-01-3286
Experiments are carried out with the diesel particulate filter and oxidation catalyst embedded in the active-flow configurations on a single cylinder diesel engine. The combined use of various active flow control schemes are identified to be capable of shifting the exhaust gas temperature, flow rate, and oxygen concentration to favorable windows for filtration, conversion, and regeneration processes. Empirical and theoretical investigations are performed with a transient one-dimensional single channel aftertreatment model developed in FORTRAN and MATLAB. The influence of the supplemental energy distribution along the length of aftertreatment device is evaluated. The theoretical analysis indicates that the active-flow control schemes have fundamental advantages in optimizing the converter thermal management including reduction in supplemental heating, increase in thermal recuperation, and improving overheating protection.
Technical Paper

A Thermal Analysis of Active-flow Control on Diesel Engine Aftertreatment

2004-10-25
2004-01-3020
One-dimensional transient modeling techniques are adapted to analyze the thermal behavior of lean-burn after-treatment systems when active flow control schemes are applied. The active control schemes include parallel alternating flow, partial restricting flow, and periodic flow reversal (FR) that are found to be especially effective to treat engine exhausts that are difficult to cope with conventional passive flow converters. To diesel particulate filters (DPF), lean NOx traps (LNT), and oxidation converters (OC), the combined use of active flow control schemes are identified to be capable of shifting the exhaust gas temperature, flow rate, and oxygen concentration to more favorable windows for the filtration, conversion, and regeneration processes. Comparison analyses are made between active flow control and passive flow control schemes in investigating the influences of gas flow, heat transfer, chemical reaction, oxygen concentration, and converter properties.
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