Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 14 of 14
Technical Paper

The Development of Vehicular Powertrain System Modeling Methodologies: Philosphy and Implementation

1997-02-24
971089
Simulation is a useful tool which can significantly reduce resources invested during product development. Vehicle manufacturers are using simulations to aid in the evaluation of designs and components, including powertrain systems and controllers. These simulations can be made more useful by addressing issues such as flexibility, modularity, and causality. These issues and other aspects involved in the development and use of powertrain system simulations are discussed in this paper, and a case study of a powertrain system model developed in the PCRL using methodologies based on considerations of such issues is presented.
Technical Paper

Nonlinear Cylinder and Intake Manifold Pressure Observers for Engine Control and Diagnostics

1994-03-01
940375
Nonlinear observer theories are applied to the engine estimation problem in order to reconstruct engine states based on the measured engine variables, and dynamic mean torque production and cylinder-by-cylinder engine models. Engine cylinder and intake manifold pressures are two important factors in engine control and diagnostics. This paper discusses how to design nonlinear engine cylinder pressure and intake manifold pressure observers that have good robustness and estimation accuracy. Sliding mode theory in Variable Structure Systems (VSS) have shown good performance and been successfully applied to many nonlinear systems. Accordingly, sliding observers are selected for this study.
Technical Paper

Hardware Implementation Details and Test Results for a High-Bandwith, Hydrostatic Transient Engine Dynamometer System

1997-02-24
970025
Transient operation of automobile engines is known to contribute significantly to regulated exhaust emissions, and is also an area of drivability concerns. Furthermore, many on-board diagnostic algorithms do not perform well during transient operation and are often temporarily disabled to avoid problems. The inability to quickly and repeatedly test engines during transient conditions in a laboratory setting limits researchers and development engineers ability to produce more effective and robust algorithms to lower vehicle emissions. To meet this need, members of the Powertrain Control Research Laboratory (PCRL) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a high-bandwidth, hydrostatic dynamometer system that will enable researchers to explore transient characteristics of engines and powertrains in the laboratory.
Technical Paper

Powertrain Simulation of the M1A1 Abrams Using Modular Model Components

1998-02-23
980926
Powertrain simulation is becoming an increasingly valuable tool to evaluate new technologies proposed for future military vehicles. The powertrain of the M1A1 Abrams tank is currently being modeled in the Powertrain Control Research Laboratory (PCRL) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This powertrain model is to be integrated with other component models in an effort to produce a high fidelity simulation of the entire vehicle.
Technical Paper

Misfire Detection and Cylinder Pressure Reconstruction for SI Engines

1994-03-01
940144
Many researchers have studied and developed methods for on-board engine combustion misfire detection in production vehicles. Misfiring can damage the catalytic converter within a short time and can lead to increased emission levels. For that reason, the on-board detection of engine misfire is one requirement of the On Board Diagnosis II (OBDII) Regulation and a recent interest for many researchers. One object in this paper is to propose a misfire detection method for multi-cylinder SI engines. The detection is achieved by examining the estimated cylinder pressures and combustion heat release rates in engine cylinders. The Sliding Observer methodology is applied in these estimations. This detection method provides a reliable and low-cost way to diagnose engine misfires. The other object of the paper is to eliminate large estimation errors due to system unobservability and reconstruct cylinder pressures.
Technical Paper

An Investigation of Load Force and Dynamic Error Magnitude Using the Lumped Mass Connecting Rod Model

1993-03-01
930617
This paper investigates the dynamic errors between the commonly used two-lump mass connecting rod model and the actual connecting rod model for the internal combustion engine. Because of the errors between the actual rod inertia and this simplified two-lump mass model, incorrect engine dynamics and internal forces are often predicted. In this paper, the magnitudes of force differences related to errors of connecting rod inertia are presented for various engines at different engine operating speeds. A method to predict the maximum side force and its maximum deviation is presented. And the technique to minimize variability in connecting rod mass and moment of inertia, as well as minimizing errors in the lumped mass model commonly used in industry are also introduced to avoid incorrect engine dynamics and internal forces.
Technical Paper

Fault Tolerance Analysis of Alternate Automotive Brake System Designs

1993-03-01
930511
Brake systems in current production automobiles are the result of a long evolutionary process beginning with the first practical hydraulic brake patent in 1917. While the basic hydraulic design has many advantages, recent modifications to this system for anti-lock braking and traction control considerably increase the cost of manufacture. As a result, many manufacturers are investigating the possibility of developing alternate braking system structures that cost less and can easily interface with vehicle electronics. Evaluating these systems for fault tolerance and failure effects is crucial to provide a safe and reliable vehicle braking system. This paper demonstrates the use of the Fault Tree Analysis method for carrying out such an evaluation. An example system is presented to illustrate the application of this method to automobile brake design.
Technical Paper

Design and Construction of a High-Bandwidth Hydrostatic Dynamometer

1993-03-01
930259
A hydrostatic dynamometer capable of accurately controlling the speed and torque of an engine has been designed and constructed. The thrust of this work is not only to build a better dynamometer, it is the first step in creating a system for laboratory simulation of the actual load environment of engines and powertrains. This paper presents the design, construction, and evaluation of a hydrostatic dynamometer. The evaluation includes speed and torque limits, and bandwidth of the dynamometer. Also, the dynamometer is compared with those in common use, and the feasibility of accurately reproducing the engine or powertrain load environments are assessed. This is the first phase of a development program; future research is discussed.
Technical Paper

A Modular HMMWV Dynamic Powertrain System Model

1999-03-01
1999-01-0740
A dynamic powertrain system model of the High Mobility Multi-Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) was created in the Powertrain Control Research Laboratory (PCRL) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Simulink graphical programming software was used to create the model. This dynamic model includes a Torsen differential model and a Hyrda-matic 4L80-E automatic transmission model as well as several other powertrain component models developed in the PCRL. Several component inertias and shaft stiffnesses are included in the dynamic model. The concepts of modularity, flexibility, and user-friendliness were emphasized during model development so that the system model would be a useful design tool. Simulation results from the model are shown.
Technical Paper

Using Dynamic Modular Diesel Engine Models To Understand System Interactions and Performance

1999-03-01
1999-01-0976
This paper reviews the engine modeling program in the Powertrain Control Research Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, focuses on simulation results obtained from a complete modular turbocharged diesel engine dynamic model developed in this lab, and suggests ways that dynamic engine system models can be used in the design process. It examines the dynamic responses and interactions between various components in the engine system, looks at how these components affect the overall performance of the system in transient and steady state operation.
Technical Paper

A Study on Automatic Transmission System Optimization Using a HMMWV Dynamic Powertrain System Model

1999-03-01
1999-01-0977
This Paper introduces a modular, flexible and user-friendly dynamic powertrain model of the US Army's High Mobility Multi-Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV). It includes the DDC 6.5L diesel engine, Hydra-matic 4L80-E automatic transmission, Torsen differentials, transfer case, and flexible drive and axle shafts. This model is used in a case study on transmission optimization design to demonstrate an application of the model. This study shows how combined optimization of the transmission hardware (clutch capacity) and control strategy (shift time) can be explored, and how the models can help the designer understand dynamic interactions as well as provide useful design guidance early in the system design phase.
Technical Paper

Simplified Engine Combustion Diagnostics Using “Synthetic” Variables

2000-03-06
2000-01-0364
This paper presents a diagnostics methodology that has applications to internal combustion engines as well as other dynamic devices. Included is an overview of the theoretical foundation of the approach, discussions on its application to internal combustion engine diagnostics, and experimental engine data showing the application of this methodology. Also included are the recent developments addressing issues of the effect of motoring compression and expansion work on crankshaft speed fluctuations and the resulting torque estimation. The methodology consists of a hard-wired nonlinear to linear transformation of engine variables that allow all subsequent diagnostics and control calculations to use linear mathematics, which significantly simplifies the size and complexity of the engine control and diagnostics strategy and code.
Technical Paper

A Transient Heat Transfer System for Research Engines

2007-04-16
2007-01-0975
An ongoing goal of the Powertrain Control Research Laboratory (PCRL) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has been to expand and improve the ability of the single cylinder internal combustion research engine to represent its multi-cylinder engine counterpart. To date, the PCRL single cylinder engine test system is able to replicate both the rotational dynamics (SAE #2004-01-0305) and intake manifold dynamics (SAE #2006-01-1074) of a multi cylinder engine using a single cylinder research engine. Another area of interest is the replication of multi-cylinder engine cold start emissions data with a single-cylinder engine test system. For this replication to occur, the single-cylinder engine must experience heat transfer to the engine coolant as if it were part of a multi-cylinder engine, in addition to the other multi-cylinder engine transient effects.
Technical Paper

Dynamic Modeling and Simulation of the Ford AOD Automobile Transmission

1995-02-01
950899
A transmission system model for Ford Motor Company's automatic transmission (AOD) system used in the Lincoln Town Car has been developed using the free-body diagram method (Newtonian approach). This model is sophisticated enough to represent the dynamic behavior of the transmission system, yet simple enough to use as a real time computer simulation tool, and as an embedded model within a dynamic observer. The transmission system and torque converter models presented in this paper are part of a larger powertrain system model at the Powertrain Control Research Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
X