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Technical Paper

High Pressure Multiple Injection Spray Characteristics

1996-02-01
960860
In previous work, high injection pressures and multiple injections per engine stroke were shown to be effective at reducing the NOx and particulate emissions of DI Diesel engine combustion [1, 2]. A series of experiments were performed to study the effects of injection pressure, back pressure, and injection strategy on the spray characteristics for multiple injections. An injection system which was capable of multiple injections was used to introduce diesel fuel into a constant volume cold spray chamber. Parallel engine experiments were conducted using the same injectors as in this work [1, 2, 3]. In these engine tests, emissions (NOx and particulate) were measured. The engine experiments were used to develop the injector and chamber operating conditions for this work. The injection pressure was varied up to 90 MPa.
Technical Paper

Experimental and Numerical Studies of High Pressure Multiple Injection Sprays

1996-02-01
960861
Characterization of high pressure diesel sprays has been performed both experimentally and numerically. The experimental study was conducted using a fuel injection system which has a capability of producing multiple injection sprays. The fuel sprays were injected from a multi-hole nozzle into a pressurized cylindrical chamber with optical windows. In order to investigate the effects of a multiple injection strategy on spray characteristics, a double injection spray with the mass evenly distributed between the first and second sprays, and a 1 millisecond dwell between sprays was compared with a single injection spray. Both single and double injection cases had nominally the same injection pressure, injection delivery, and ambient gas density. Transient spray tip penetration lengths and spray angles were obtained from high speed photographic spray images. The spray droplet sizes were derived from the images by using a light extinction method.
Technical Paper

Temperature Effects on Fuel Sprays from a Multi-Hole Nozzle Injector

1996-10-01
962005
A study of fuel spray characteristics for diesel fuel from a multi-hole nozzle injector was performed yielding tip penetration length and spray cone angle for each of the spray plumes from a six hole injector. The main feature of the system used was that analysis of all the fuel plumes could occur at one time, as all the plumes were imaged on the same piece of film. Spray behavior was examined for two injection pressures (72 MPa and 122 MPa) and for ambient temperatures up to 523 K (250°C). The results in this paper show how the spray plumes behave as they leave each of the six holes of the injector. The characteristics of each hole differs during injection. The variations of spray cone angle and tip penetration length between holes are small, but significant. These variations in tip penetration and cone angle changed as the temperature of the chamber changed, but the overall characteristics of the spray plumes changed only slightly for the temperatures used in this paper.
Technical Paper

Effect of Injector Nozzle Hole Size and Number on Spray Characteristics and the Performance of a Heavy Duty D.I. Diesel Engine

1996-10-01
962002
An engine emissions and performance study was conducted in conjunction with a series of experiments using a constant volume cold spray chamber. The purpose of the study was to explore the effects of number of holes and hole size on the emissions and performance of a direct injection heavy duty diesel engine. The spray experiments provide insight into the spray parameters and their role in the engine's combustion processes. The fuel system used for both the engine and spray chamber experiments was an electronically controlled, common rail injector. The injector nozzle hole size and number combinations used in the experiments included 225X8 (225 gm diameter holes with 8 holes in the nozzle), 260X6, 260X8, and 30OX6. The engine tests were conducted on an instrumented single cylinder version of the Caterpillar 3400 series heavy duty diesel engine. Data were taken with the engine running at 1600 RPM, 75% load.
Technical Paper

Transient Spray Characteristics of a Direct-Injection Spark-Ignited Fuel Injector

1997-02-24
970629
This paper describes the transient spray characteristics of a high pressure, single fluid injector, intended for use in a direct-injection spark-ignited (DISI) engine. The injector was a single hole, pintle type injector and was electronically controlled. A variety of measurement diagnostics, including full-field imaging and line-of-sight diffraction based particle sizing were employed for spray characterization. Transient patternator measurements were also performed to obtain temporally resolved average mass flux distributions. Particle size and obscuration measurements were performed at three locations in the spray and at three injection pressures: 3.45 MPa (500 psi), 4.83 Mpa (700 psi), and 6.21 MPa (900 psi). Results of the spray imaging experiments indicated that the spray shapes varied with time after the start of injection and contained a leading mass, or slug along the center line of the spray.
Technical Paper

Effects of Injection Pressure and Nozzle Geometry on Spray SMD and D.I. Emissions

1995-10-01
952360
A study was performed to correlate the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD), NOx and particulate emissions of a direct injection diesel engine with various injection pressures and different nozzle geometry. The spray experiments and engine emission tests were conducted in parallel using the same fuel injection system and same operating conditions. With high speed photography and digital image analysis, a light extinction technique was used to obtain the spray characteristics which included spray tip penetration length, spray angle, and overall average SMD for the entire spray. The NOx and particulate emissions were acquired by running the tests on a fully instrumented Caterpillar 3406 heavy duty engine. Experimental results showed that for higher injection pressures, a smaller SMD was observed, i.e. a finer spray was obtained. For this case, a higher NOx and lower particulate resulted.
Technical Paper

A Study on the Effects of Fuel Viscosity and Nozzle Geometry on High Injection Pressure Diesel Spray Characteristics

1997-02-24
970353
The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of fuel viscosity and the effects of nozzle inlet configuration on the characteristics of high injection pressure sprays. Three different viscosity fuels were used to reveal the effects of viscosity on the spray characteristics. The effects of nozzle inlet configuration on spray characteristics were studied using two mini-sac six-hole nozzles with different inlet configurations. A common rail injection system was used to introduce the spray at 90 MPa injection pressure into a constant volume chamber pressurized with argon gas. The information on high pressure transient sprays was captured by a high speed movie camera synchronized with a pulsed copper vapor laser. The images were analyzed to obtain the spray characteristics which include spray tip penetration, spray cone angle at two different regions, and overall spray Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD).
Technical Paper

Investigation of Diesel Sprays Using Diffraction-Based Droplet Sizing

1995-02-01
950458
The study of combustion in direct injection Diesel engines demands detailed understanding of the behavior of the injection. Understanding the injection involves characterizing the distribution of fuel particle sizes throughout the spray. This work studied the size distributions of sprays from commercial Diesel injectors under a series of conditions. A diffraction-based diagnostic obtained maps of local fuel droplet size information over the full spray field. Most quantitative techniques currently used in spray research provide quantitative time-ranging data at a single point in the spray field. Spatially resolved information proves more useful in studying transient sprays. The spatially resolved maps of particle size obtained in this experiment showed the reliability of the diagnostic, exhibited the transience of the fine structure of these sprays, and demonstrated the evolution of the sprays with time.
Technical Paper

Nozzle Effect on High Pressure Diesel Injection

1995-02-01
950083
Studies of transient diesel spray characteristics at high injection pressures were conducted in a constant volume chamber by utilizing a high speed photography and light extinction optical diagnostic technique. Two different types of nozzle hole entrances were investigated: a sharp-edged and a round-edged nozzle. The experimental results show that for the same injection delivery, the sharp-edged inlet injector needed a higher injection pressure to overcome the higher friction loss, but it produced longer spray tip penetration length, larger spray angle, smaller droplet sizes, and also lower particulate emission from a parallel engine test. For the round-edged and smooth edged tips at the same injection pressure, the sharp-edged inlet tip took a longer injection duration to deliver a fixed mass of fuel and produced larger overall average Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) droplets.
Technical Paper

Intake Air Velocity Measurements for a Motored Direct Injection Spark Ignited Engine

1999-03-01
1999-01-0499
Velocity measurements have been made in a motored engine intended for direct injection spark ignited (DISI) operation. Previous experiments showed the effect of intake gas velocities on direct injection spray plumes in this engine, without directly quantifying the gas velocities involved. This work documents the intake velocities in the vicinity of the spray plume, although the spray was not present in these experiments. The measurements were made using an LDV system. Two velocity components were measured, though not simultaneously, through two orthogonal windows in the cylinder of an optical engine equipped with a head designed for DISI engine use. This engine had 4-valves and a pent-roof; the injector (when installed) was positioned slightly off-center in the head, with the spark plug located near by.
Technical Paper

Evaporating Spray Concentration Measurementsfrom Small and Medium Bore Diesel Injectors

2002-03-04
2002-01-0219
Vapor concentration measurements were performed for two unit injectors typically found in small- and medium-bore applications under evaporating conditions similar to those experienced in Diesel engines. Ambient gas temperatures of 800 and 1000 K and an ambient density of 15 kg/m3 were investigated using a constant volume combustion-type spray chamber. The exciplex laserinduced fluorescence technique with TMPD/naphthalene doped into the fuel was used to quantitatively determine the vapor-phase concentration and liquid-phase extent. The vapor-phase concentration was quantified using a previously developed method that includes corrections for the temperature dependence of the TMPD fluorescence, laser sheet absorption, and the laser sheet intensity profile. The effect of increasing ambient temperature (1000 vs. 800 K) was significant on intact liquid length, and on the spray-spreading angle in the early portion of the injection period.
Technical Paper

Air Entrainment in a High Pressure Diesel Spray

1997-05-01
971620
This paper presents some experimental results of air velocity measurements near high pressure diesel sprays. The measurements were made using a moderately high pressure (90 MPa) common rail injector in a pressurized spray chamber. The chamber was operated at ambient temperature (25°C) and was pressurized with Argon to produce a chamber gas density of about 27 kg/m3, similar to densities found in a large turbocharged diesel near TDC. The gas phase was tagged using water droplets doped with Stilbene 420, with an estimated droplet size of 18 μm. The atomized water-Stilbene droplets were illuminated with the third harmonic of a pair of Nd:YAG lasers which caused the Stilbene to fluoresce at about 420 nm. To reduce the competing fluorescence from the injected fuel, the injector was fueled with Jet-A fuel. Using the two lasers, double exposures of the small droplets were recorded on film. The laser pulse lengths were about 6 ns, and typical times between pulses were 100 μs.
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