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Technical Paper

Potato Tuber Formation and Metabolism in the Spaceflight Environment

1996-07-01
961393
Five potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) leaf cuttings were flown on STS-73 in late October, 1995 as part of the 16-day USML-2 mission. Pre-flight studies were conducted to study tuber growth, determine carbohydrate concentrations and examine the developing starch grains within the tuber. In these tests, tubers attained a fresh weight of 1.4 g tuber-1 after 13 days. Tuber fresh mass was significantly correlated to tuber diameter. Greater than 60% of the tuber dry mass was starch and the starch grains varied in size from 2 to 40 mm in the long axis. For the flight experiment, cuttings were obtained from seven-week-old Norland potato plants, kept at 5°C for 12 hours then planted into arcillite in the ASTROCULTURE™ flight hardware. The flight package was loaded on-board the orbiter 22 hours prior to launch.
Technical Paper

Near Wall Interaction in Spray Impingement

1996-02-01
960863
The hydrodynamic details of droplet-droplet and droplet-liquid film interactions on solid surfaces are believed to have a significant role in spray impingement phenomena, yet details of this interaction have not been clearly identified. The interaction among the droplets during impact affects their residence time on the surface, spreading, and droplet and liquid film stability. After impact, droplet interactions affect droplet collisions, coalescence and liquid splashing, This interaction affects secondary atomization and the droplet dispersion characteristics of the impingement process. In this study, details of droplet-droplet and droplet-liquid film interactions in solid surface impingement have been visualized using high speed photography. The effects of these interactions on secondary atomization and droplet dispersion have been quantified.
Technical Paper

Modeling Fuel Film Formation and Wall Interaction in Diesel Engines

1996-02-01
960628
A fuel film model has been developed and implemented into the KIVA-II code to help account for fuel distribution during combustion in diesel engines. Spray-wall interaction and spray-film interaction are also incorporated into the model. The model simulates thin fuel film flow on solid surfaces of arbitrary configuration. This is achieved by solving the continuity and momentum equations for the two dimensional film that flows over a three dimensional surface. The major physical effects considered in the model include mass and momentum contributions to the film due to spray drop impingement, splashing effects, various shear forces, piston acceleration, and dynamic pressure effects. In order to adequately represent the drop interaction process, impingement regimes and post-impingement behavior have been modeled using experimental data and mass, momentum and energy conservation constraints. The regimes modeled for spray-film interaction are stick, rebound, spread, and splash.
Technical Paper

Submerged Electrical Discharges for Water Decontamination and Disinfection

2007-07-09
2007-01-3175
A modular and scalable Dense Medium Plasma Water Purification Reactor was developed, which uses atmospheric-pressure electrical discharges under water to generate highly reactive species to break down organic contaminants and microorganisms. Key benefits of this novel technology include: (i) extremely high efficiency in both decontamination and disinfection; (ii) operating continuously at ambient temperature and pressure; (iii) reducing demands on the containment vessel; and (iv) requiring no consumables. This plasma based technology was developed to replace the catalytic reactor being used in the planned International Space Station Water Processor Assembly.
Technical Paper

Measurement of Diesel Spray Impingement and Fuel Film Characteristics Using Refractive Index Matching Method

2007-04-16
2007-01-0485
The fuel film thickness resulting from diesel fuel spray impingement was measured in a chamber at conditions representative of early injection timings used for low temperature diesel combustion. The adhered fuel volume and the radial distribution of the film thickness are presented. Fuel was injected normal to the impingement surface at ambient temperatures of 353 K, 426 K and 500 K, with densities of 10 kg/m3 and 25 kg/m3. Two injectors, with nozzle diameters of 100 μm and 120 μm, were investigated. The results show that the fuel film volume was strongly affected by the ambient temperature, but was minimally affected by the ambient density. The peak fuel film thickness and the film radius were found to increase with decreased temperature. The fuel film was found to be circular in shape, with an inner region of nearly constant thickness. The major difference observed with temperature was a decrease in the radial extent of the film.
Technical Paper

Reinventing the Internal Combustion (IC) Engine Head and Exhaust Gaskets

2002-03-04
2002-01-0332
This paper describes how a blend of silicon polymers, mixed with the right combination of fillers, enables the production of durable rubber IC engine head and exhaust gaskets. The resin blend, when mixed with glass fiber reinforcement, produces a liquid sealant suitable for exhaust gasket applications. The exhaust sealant and laminate head gaskets were tested on Ford 460 truck engines at Jasper Engine Company and completed more than 5,000 hours of durability testing without incident. Fabric reinforced polymer (FRP) head and exhaust gaskets can be laser cut from molded laminates, creating a ceramic glass-sealed edge. Thermogravimetric scans of typical gasket laminate material reveal an 88%-yield at 1000°C. FRP head gaskets also enable the cost-effective production of multiple spark ignition (MSI) head gaskets.
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