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Technical Paper

Diesel Engine Cold Start Combustion Instability and Control Strategy

2001-03-05
2001-01-1237
Combustion instability and white smoke emissions are serious problems during cold starting of diesel engines. In this investigation, a model has been applied to predict misfiring based on an analysis of the autoignition process. The effect of injection timing on combustion instability during the cold start transient, at different ambient temperatures is investigated, both theoretically and experimentally. Maps have been developed to show the zones where misfiring would occur. The experimental work was conducted on a direct injection heavy-duty diesel engine in a cold room. The room temperature covered a range from 21 ° C to -10 ° C. The cycle-by-cycle data analysis was made and results plotted on the developed maps. The experimental results correlated fairly well with the model prediction. Based on the analysis, a new strategy for cold starting can be developed to reduce combustion instability and white smoke emissions.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Effects of EGR and Injection Pressure on Emissions in a High-Speed Direct-Injection Diesel Engine

2001-03-05
2001-01-1004
Experimental data is used in conjunction with multi-dimensional modeling in a modified version of the KIVA-3V code to characterize the emissions behavior of a high-speed, direct-injection diesel engine. Injection pressure and EGR are varied across a range of typical small-bore diesel operating conditions and the resulting soot-NOx tradeoff is analyzed. Good agreement is obtained between experimental and modeling trends; the HSDI engine shows increasing soot and decreasing NOx with higher EGR and lower injection pressure. The model also indicates that most of the NOx is formed in the region where the bulk of the initial heat release first takes place, both for zero and high EGR cases. The mechanism of NOx reduction with high EGR is shown to be primarily through a decrease in thermal NOx formation rate.
Technical Paper

Spray Dynamics of High Pressure Fuel Injectors for DI Gasoline Engines

1996-10-01
961925
An experimental study was made to investigate the spray characteristics of high pressure fuel injectors for direct-injection gasoline engines. The global spray development process was visualized using two-dimensional laser Mie scattering technique. The spray atomization process was characterized by Phase Doppler particle analyzer. The transient spray development process was investigated under different fuel injection conditions as a function of the time after the fuel injection start. The effects of injector design, fuel injection pressure, injection duration, ambient pressure, and fuel property on the spray breakup and atomization characteristics were studied in details. Two clear counter-rotating recirculation zones are observed at the later stage or after the end of fuel injection inside the fuel sprays with a small momentum. The circumferential distribution of the spray from the large-angle injector is quite irregular and looks like a star with several wings projected out.
Technical Paper

Parameter Scheduling Controller for Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) System

1997-02-24
970620
A novel approach is presented to the problem of robust control strategy for an Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system. Modeling issues and controller design for an electric valve are presented. Robustness is one of the main issues due to nonlinearities (hysteresis, friction), computational time delays, and the effects of complex exhaust gas dynamics. A high level of noise, due to engine vibrations, makes the input-output model identification very difficult. We use a special windowing technique to successfully complete the identification. It was found that a good approximation of the system dynamics consists of a first order transfer function with a time delay whose parameters depend on the operating conditions (engine load, r.p.m.). Thus, the nonlinear effects of friction and hysteresis are replaced, for the purpose of control design, by variable gain, time delay, and time constant of the linear model.
Technical Paper

Reactor Evaluation of Ceria-Zirconia as an Oxygen Storage Material for Automotive Catalysts

1997-02-24
970462
We have prepared and tested laboratory scale monoliths wash-coated with 10, 20 and 30 wt% of either CeO2 or Ce.75Zr.25O2 (remainder is alumina). Wet impregnation was used to load the wash-coated monoliths with 50g/ft Pt:Rh at a 5:1 ratio. The catalyst were aged at temperatures between 825°C and 950°C using a cycled redox aging. The catalysts were then tested in a full-feed simulated exhaust laboratory reactor with air-to-fuel ratio (A/F) perturbations (frequencies at 1 and 3 Hz and amplitudes up to +/- 0.8 A/F). Even the lowest loading of Ce.75Zr.25O2 outperformed all three loadings of CeO2 over a full range of reaction temperatures, A/F perturbations, and catalyst space velocity (SV). Our data indicates that the ceria-zirconia catalysts can tolerate cycled redox aging at sustained bed temperatures at least 25°C higher (∼925°C vs. < 900°C) than can ceria. For the CeO2 catalysts aged at or above 900°C we observed an inverse correlation of catalyst activity to CeO2 loading.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Investigation of Spray Transfer Processes in an Electrostatic Rotating Bell Applicator

1998-09-29
982290
A better understanding is needed of the electrostatic rotating bell (ESRB) application of metallic basecoat paint to automobile exteriors in order to exploit their high transfer efficiency without compromising the coating quality. This paper presents the initial results from experimental investigation of sprays from an ESRB which is designed to apply water-borne paint. Water was used as paint surrogate for simplicity. The atomization and transport regions of the spray were investigated using laser light sheet visualizations and phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). The experiments were conducted at varying levels of the three important operating parameters: liquid flow rate, shaping-air flow rate, and bellcup rotational speed. The results show that bellcup speed dominates atomization, but liquid and shaping-air flow rate settings significantly influence the spray structure. The visualization images showed that the atomization occurs in ligament breakup regime.
Technical Paper

Contribution of Cold and Hot Start Transients in Engine-out HC Emissions

1998-10-19
982645
Engine-out HC emissions were investigated during cold and hot starts. The tests were conducted at room temperature, on a new Chrysler 2.4-L, 4-cylinder, 16-valve, DOHC, multipoint-port-fuel-injection gasoline engine. Real time engine-out HC emissions were measured using Cambustion Fast Response Flame Ionization Detector (FRFID). Sources of unburned hydrocarbon emissions were discussed in details. Unburned hydrocarbons emitted during the cold-start were much higher than the hot-start. Cylinder-to-cylinder variation was investigated. A fuel inventory program was used to characterize total injected fuel, burned fuel, unburned HC, and fuel unaccounted for (mainly accumulated fuel in the engine system and CO). A fuel interrupt test was run to examine the possibility of burning the leftover fuel after the fuel shut-off. The contribution of the cold and hot start modes in engine-out HC emissions was determined.
Technical Paper

Effect of Imposed Faults on a Distributor Injection System

1974-02-01
740531
The effects of several faults on different parameters in a distributor injection system are studied both theoretically and experimentally. The faults imposed on a healthy system are: fuel leaks between the pump and injector, improper adjustment of the injector opening pressure, a broken or missing injector spring, plugged nozzle holes, and a stuck-closed needle. The injector parameters examined include maximum fuel pressures reached at different locations in the system, needle lift, injection lag, and injection rate.
Technical Paper

Safety Performance of a Chemically Strengthened Windshield

1969-02-01
690485
Safety performance of an experimental windshield with a thin, chemically tempered inner pane is compared with the standard windshield and other experimental windshields. The chemically tempered windshield has a penetration velocity of 35 mph compared with 26 mph penetration velocity for the standard windshield and has lower peak head accelerations than other types used in the experiments. The windshield tested produces a bulge on impact, which decelerates the head over a long distance with low accelerations. The bulge or pocket is lined with particles that are less lacerative than the standard annealed glass.
Technical Paper

Safety Performance Comparison of 30 MIL HPR Laminated and Monolithic Differentially Tempered Windshields

1970-02-01
700427
Conventional 30 mil HPR laminated and wide-zone monolithic tempered windshields are compared on a safety performance basis from the stand-points of occupant injuries from frontal force collisions and injury or loss of control from breakage from high speed external impact of stones. All experiments were conducted with the windshields installed by conventional methods in an automobile. Occupant injury potential as measured by the Severity Index for brain damage at a 30 mph barrier impact simulation was approximately two times as high for the tempered as for the laminated windshields, although only one tempered windshield exceeded the recommended maximum value of 1,000. Severe lacerations resulted in all impacts in which the tempered glass broke. Less severe lacerations were found for the laminated windshield impacts at comparable speeds.
Technical Paper

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Reengineering of a Conventional Sedan for EcoCAR2

2015-04-14
2015-01-1235
The Wayne State University student team reengineered a mid-sized sedan into a functional plug-in hybrid electric vehicle as participants in the EcoCAR 2 competition sponsored by the US Department of Energy and managed by Argonne National Laboratory. The competition goals included reducing petroleum usage, emissions, and energy consumption through implementing advanced vehicle technologies. During the competition, the team did plug-in charging of the 19 kWh high voltage traction battery, drove in pure electric mode (engine off) until the battery was depleted, then switched to hybrid mode and continued driving by using E85 from the fuel tank. The pure electric mode vehicle driving range was 48 km [30 miles] while pulling an emissions instrumented test trailer and projected to be 58 km [36 miles] without the test trailer load for the competition's city/highway blend drive cycle.
Technical Paper

Characterization and Simulation of a Unit Injector

1975-02-01
750773
The characteristics of the diesel engine unit injector were studied both theoretically and experimentally. The transient fuel pressure in the unit injector was indirectly measured by using strain gauges placed in different locations on the drive train, between the cam and plunger. The events which take place during the injection process were analyzed and the effects of several design and operating variables on the different injection parameters were determined. Computer simulation showed a fairly good agreement between computed and experimental results.
Technical Paper

Impact of Biodiesel Emission Products from a Multi-Cylinder Direct Injection Diesel Engine on Particulate Filter Performance

2009-04-20
2009-01-1184
As diesel emission regulations continue to increase, the use of exhaust aftertreatment systems containing, for example the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particulate filter (DPF) will become necessary in order to meet these stringent emission requirements. The addition of a DOC and DPF in conjunction with utilizing biodiesel fuels requires extensive research to study the implications that biodiesel blends have on emissions as well as to examine the effect on aftertreatment devices. The proceeding work discusses results from a 2006 VM Motori four-cylinder 2.8L direct injection diesel engine coupled with a diesel oxidation catalyst and catalyzed diesel particulate filter. Tests were done using ultra low sulfur diesel fuel blended with 20% choice white grease biodiesel fuel to evaluate the effects of biodiesel emission products on the performance and effectiveness of the aftertreatment devices and the effect of low temperature combustion modes.
Technical Paper

Advanced Low Temperature Combustion (ALTC): Diesel Engine Performance, Fuel Economy and Emissions

2008-04-14
2008-01-0652
The objective of this work is to develop a strategy to reduce the penalties in the diesel engine performance, fuel economy and HC and CO emissions, associated with the operation in the low temperature combustion regime. Experiments were conducted on a research high speed, single cylinder, 4-valve, small-bore direct injection diesel engine equipped with a common rail injection system under simulated turbocharged conditions, at IMEP = 3 bar and engine speed = 1500 rpm. EGR rates were varied over a wide range to cover engine operation from the conventional to the LTC regime, up to the misfiring point. The injection pressure was varied from 600 bar to 1200 bar. Injection timing was adjusted to cover three different LPPCs (Location of the Peak rate of heat release due to the Premixed Combustion fraction) at 10.5° aTDC, 5 aTDC and 2 aTDC. The swirl ratio was varied from 1.44 to 7.12. Four steps are taken to move from LTC to ALTC.
Technical Paper

Effect of Biodiesel (B-20) on Performance and Emissions in a Single Cylinder HSDI Diesel Engine

2008-04-14
2008-01-1401
The focus of this study is to determine the effect of using B-20 (a blend of 20% soybean methyl ester biodiesel and 80% ultra low sulfur diesel fuel) on the combustion process, performance and exhaust emissions in a High Speed Direct Injection (HSDI) diesel engine equipped with a common rail injection system. The engine was operated under simulated turbocharged conditions with 3-bar indicated mean effective pressure and 1500 rpm engine speed. The experiments covered a wide range of injection pressures and EGR rates. The rate of heat release trace has been analyzed in details to determine the effect of the properties of biodiesel on auto ignition and combustion processes and their impact on engine out emissions. The results and the conclusions are supported by a statistical analysis of data that provides a quantitative significance of the effects of the two fuels on engine out emissions.
Technical Paper

Effect of Different Biodiesel Blends on Autoignition, Combustion, Performance and Engine-Out Emissions in a Single Cylinder HSDI Diesel Engine

2009-04-20
2009-01-0489
The effects of different blends of Soybean Methyl Ester (biodiesel) and ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel: B-00 (ULSD), B-20, B-40, B-60, B-80 and B-100 (biodiesel); on autoignition, combustion, performance, and engine out emissions of different species including particulate matter (PM) in the exhaust, were investigated in a single-cylinder, high speed direct injection (HSDI) diesel engine equipped with a common rail injection system. The engine was operated at 1500 rpm under simulated turbocharged conditions at 5 bar IMEP load with varied injection pressures at a medium swirl of 3.77 w ithout EGR. Analysis of test results was done to determine the role of biodiesel percentage in the fuel blend on the basic thermodynamic and combustion processes under fuel injection pressures ranging from 600 bar to 1200 bar.
Technical Paper

Numerical Study of Ultra Low Solidity Airfoil Diffuser in an Automotive Turbocharger Compressor

2009-04-20
2009-01-1470
For the application of advanced clean combustion technologies, such as diesel HCCI/LTC, a compressor with high efficiency over a broad operation range is required to supply a high amount of EGR with minimum pumping loss. A compressor with high pitch of vaneless diffuser would substantially improve the flow range of the compressor, but it is at the cost of compressor efficiency, especially at low mass flow area where most of the city driving cycles resides. In present study, an ultra low solidity compressor vane diffuser was numerically investigated. It is well known that the flow leaving the impeller is highly distorted, unsteady and turbulent, especially at relative low mass flow rate and near the shroud side of the compressor. A conventional vaned diffuser with high stagger angle could help to improve the performance of the compressor at low end. However, adding diffuser vane to a compressor typically restricts the flow range at high end.
Technical Paper

Time Series Modeling of Terrain Profiles

2005-11-01
2005-01-3561
Every time we measure the terrain profiles we would get a different set of data due to the measuring errors and due to the fact that the linear tracks on which the measuring vehicle travels can not be exactly the same every time. However the data collected at different times from the same terrain should share the similar intrinsic properties. Hence it is natural to consider statistical modeling of the terrain profiles. In this paper we shall use the time series models with time being the distance from the starting point. We receive data from the Belgian Block and the Perryman3 testing tracks. The Belgian Block data are shown to behave like a uniformly modulated process([7]), i.e. it is the product of a deterministic function and a stationary process. The modeling of the profiles can be done by estimating the deterministic function and fit the stationary process with a well-known ARMA model. The Perryman3 data are more irregular.
Technical Paper

Equivalent Drive Cycle Analysis, Simulation, and Testing - Wayne State University's On-Road Route for EcoCAR2

2013-04-08
2013-01-0549
The Wayne State University (WSU) EcoCAR2 student team is participating in a design competition for the conversion of a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu into a plug-in hybrid. The team created a repeatable on-road test drive route using local public roads near the university that would be of similar velocity ranges contained in the EcoCAR2 4-Cycle Drive Schedule - a weighted combination of four different EPA-based drive cycles (US06 split into city and highway portions, all of the HWFET, first 505 seconds portion of UDDS). The primary purpose of the team's local on-road route was to be suitable for testing the team's added hybrid components and control strategy for minimizing petroleum consumption and tail pipe emissions. Comparison analysis of velocities was performed between seven local routes and the EcoCAR2 4-Cycle Drive Schedule. Three of the seven local routes had acceptable equivalence for velocity (R₂ ≻ 0.80) and the team selected one of them to be the on-road test drive route.
Technical Paper

GDi Skew-Angled Nozzle Flow and Near-Field Spray Analysis using Optical and X-Ray Imaging and VOF-LES Computational Fluid Dynamics

2013-04-08
2013-01-0255
Improvement of spray atomization and penetration characteristics of the gasoline direct-injection (GDi ) multi-hole injector is a critical component of the GDi combustion developments, especially in the context of engine down-sizing and turbo-charging trend that is adopted in order to achieve the European target CO₂, US CAFE, and concomitant stringent emissions standards. Significant R&D efforts are directed towards optimization of the nozzle designs, in order to improve the GDi multi-hole spray characteristics. This publication reports VOF-LES analyses of GDi single-hole skew-angled nozzles, with β=30° skew (bend) angle and different nozzle geometries. The objective is to extend previous works to include the effect of nozzle-hole skew angle on the nozzle flow and spray primary breakup. VOF-LES simulations of a single nozzle-hole of a purpose-designed GDi multi-hole seat geometry, with three identical nozzle-holes per 120° seat segment, are performed.
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