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House Noise-Reduction Measurements for Use in Studies of Aircraft Flyover Noise

2020-03-13
WIP
AIR1081A
This AIR describes the results of some house noise reduction measurements that were made in five locations in the U.S. in 1966, 1964, 1967, and 1969. The houses used in these tests included a wide range of construction types of single and multiple family dwellings. The house noise reductions also cover a wide range. The average house noise reduction developed in this AIR should be used only when such an average is needed. The principle objective of this AIR is to use these noise reduction measurements to develop curves showing the noise reduction of aircraft flyover noise when the noise passes from the outside to the inside of houses located in various climates. The noise-reduction data presented herein can be applied to measurements of aircraft noise made outdoors in order to estimate the noise levels indoors.
Standard

Ground-Plane Microphone Configuration for Propeller-Driven Light-Aircraft Noise Measurement

2020-03-13
WIP
ARP4055A
The scope of this ARP embraces the description of a configuration for a ground-plane microphone installation that may be used to determine sound pressure levels equivalent to those which would have been measured in an acoustic freefield at the microphone location. The one-third - octave-band center-frequency range over which equivalent freefield sound pressure levels may be obtained is from as low as 50 Hz to at least as high as 10,000 Hz. The specific application of the measurement technique described in this ARP is the determination of the equivalent freefield sound pressure levels of the noise produced by propeller-driven light aircraft, in flight, for sound incidence angles within 30 degrees of the normal to the ground. For larger angles to the normal, additional adjustments may be necessary which are outside the scope of this ARP.
Standard

Ground-Plane Microphone Configuration for Propeller-Driven Light-Aircraft Noise Measurement

1988-01-01
CURRENT
ARP4055
The scope of this ARP embraces the description of a configuration for a ground-plane microphone installation that may be used to determine sound pressure levels equivalent to those which would have been measured in an acoustic freefield at the microphone location. The one-third - octave-band center-frequency range over which equivalent freefield sound pressure levels may be obtained is from as low as 50 Hz to at least as high as 10,000 Hz. The specific application of the measurement technique described in this ARP is the determination of the equivalent freefield sound pressure levels of the noise produced by propeller-driven light aircraft, in flight, for sound incidence angles within 30 degrees of the normal to the ground. For larger angles to the normal, additional adjustments may be necessary which are outside the scope of this ARP.
Standard

TYPE MEASUREMENTS OF AIRPLANE INTERIOR SOUND PRESSURE LEVELS DURING CRUISE

1990-08-01
HISTORICAL
ARP1323A
The primary measurement procedure recommended in this ARP includes the recording of sound pressure signals in the interior of an airplane during steady state cruise conditions with analysis after the flight into octave band (or one-third octave band) sound pressure levels.
Standard

Type Measurements of Airplane Interior Sound Pressure Levels During Cruise

2012-08-16
CURRENT
ARP1323B
The primary measurement procedure recommended in this ARP includes the recording of sound pressure signals in the interior of an airplane during steady state cruise conditions with analysis after the flight into octave band (or one-third octave band) sound pressure levels.
Standard

COMPARISON OF GROUND-RUNUP AND FLYOVER NOISE LEVELS

2002-12-16
CURRENT
AIR1216
Because of the special circumstances under which these tests were conducted, it is necessary to carefully define the limitations on the validity of the results. The measurements and the comparisons reported here apply only to the specific locations of the noise sources and microphones and only for the specific weather and ground-surface conditions existing at the time of the tests. It cannot be assumed that these conditions are representative of most field measurements of aircraft exterior noise.
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