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Standard

Environmental Control Systems Terminology

1944-05-01
HISTORICAL
ARP147
This ARP provides the definition of terms commonly used in aircraft environmental control system (ECS) design and analysis. Many of the terms may be used as guidelines for establishing standard ECS nomenclature. Some general thermodynamic terms are included that are frequently used in ECS analysis, but this document is not meant to be an inclusive list of such terms.
Standard

Environmental Control Systems Terminology

1948-03-01
HISTORICAL
ARP147A
This ARP provides the definition of terms commonly used in aircraft environmental control system (ECS) design and analysis. Many of the terms may be used as guidelines for establishing standard ECS nomenclature. Some general thermodynamic terms are included that are frequently used in ECS analysis, but this document is not meant to be an inclusive list of such terms.
Standard

Environmental Control Systems Terminology

1959-11-15
HISTORICAL
ARP147B
This ARP provides the definition of terms commonly used in aircraft environmental control system (ECS) design and analysis. Many of the terms may be used as guidelines for establishing standard ECS nomenclature. Some general thermodynamic terms are included that are frequently used in ECS analysis, but this document is not meant to be an inclusive list of such terms.
Standard

Engine Bleed Air Systems for Aircraft

1987-02-01
HISTORICAL
ARP1796
This ARP discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, installation environment and design considerations for systems within the ATA 100 specification, Chapter 36, Pneumatic (reference 1). This ATA system/chapter covers equipment used to deliver compressed air from a power source to connecting points for other systems such as air conditioning, pressurization, anti-icing, cross-engine starting, air turbine motors, air driven hydraulic pumps, and other pneumatic demands. The engine bleed air system includes components for preconditioning the compressed air (temperature, pressure or flow regulation), ducting to distribute high or low pressure air to the using systems, and sensors/instruments to indicate temperature and pressure levels within the system. The engine bleed air system interfaces with the following ATA 100 systems: The interface with these systems/chapters is at the inlet of the shutoff/control valve of each associated system.
Standard

Engine Bleed Air Systems for Aircraft

2007-03-22
HISTORICAL
ARP1796A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, installation environment and design considerations for military and commercial aircraft systems within the Air Transport Association (ATA) ATA 100 specification, Chapter 36, Pneumatic. This ATA system/chapter covers equipment used to deliver compressed air from a power source to connecting points for other systems such as air conditioning, pressurization, ice protection, cross-engine starting, air turbine motors, air driven hydraulic pumps, on board oxygen generating systems (OBOGS), on board inert gas generating systems (OBIGGS), and other pneumatic demands. The engine bleed air system includes components for preconditioning the compressed air (temperature, pressure or flow regulation), ducting to distribute high or low pressure air to the using systems, and sensors/instruments to indicate temperature and pressure levels within the system.
Standard

Engine Bleed Air Systems for Aircraft

2015-07-13
CURRENT
ARP1796B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, installation environment and design considerations for military and commercial aircraft systems within the Air Transport Association (ATA) ATA 100 specification, Chapter 36, Pneumatic. This ATA system/chapter covers equipment used to deliver compressed air from a power source to connecting points for other systems such as air conditioning, pressurization, ice protection, cross-engine starting, air turbine motors, air driven hydraulic pumps, on board oxygen generating systems (OBOGS), on board inert gas generating systems (OBIGGS), and other pneumatic demands. The engine bleed air system includes components for preconditioning the compressed air (temperature, pressure or flow regulation), ducting to distribute high or low pressure air to the using systems, and sensors/instruments to indicate temperature and pressure levels within the system.
Standard

GUIDE FOR PREPARING AN ECS COMPUTER PROGRAM USER'S MANUAL

1980-06-01
HISTORICAL
ARP1623
These recommendations apply to the user's manual for any computer program pertaining to aircraft ECS. This includes computer programs for: a Cabin air conditioning and pressurization performance. b Avionics equipment cooling system performance. c Engine bleed air system performance. d Compartment and equipment thermal analysis. e Environmental protection system performance. These recommendations apply to user's manuals for generalized computer programs as well as those for a specific component or system.
Standard

Guide for Preparing An ECS Computer Program User's Manual

1997-10-01
CURRENT
ARP1623A
The purpose of this recommended practice is to provide aircraft industry with guidelines as to the pertinent information which should be contained in a user's manual for an environmental control system (ECS) computer program. This recommended practice is intended to facilitate the preparation of a user's manual without unduly restricting its format or content.
Standard

Air Cycle Air Conditioning Systems for Military Air Vehicles

2013-08-06
HISTORICAL
AS4073A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for air cycle air conditioning systems used on military air vehicles for cooling, heating, ventilation, and moisture and contamination control. General recommendations for an air conditioning system, which may include an air cycle system as a cooling source, are included in MIL-E-18927E (AS) and JSSG-2009. Air cycle air conditioning systems include those components which condition high temperature and high pressure air for delivery to occupied and equipment compartments and to electrical and electronic equipment. This document is applicable to open and closed loop air cycle systems. Definitions are contained in Section 5 of this document.
Standard

Air Cycle Air Conditioning Systems for Military Air Vehicles

2000-03-01
HISTORICAL
AS4073
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for air cycle air conditioning systems used on military air vehicles for cooling, heating, ventilation, and moisture and contamination control. General recommendations for an air conditioning system, which may include an air cycle system as a cooling source, are included in MIL-E-18927E (AS) and MIL-E-87145 (USAF). Air cycle air conditioning systems include those components which condition high temperature and high pressure air for delivery to occupied and equipment compartments and to electrical and electronic equipment. This document is applicable to open and closed loop air cycle systems. Definitions are contained in Section 5 of this document.
Standard

Air Cycle Air Conditioning Systems for Air Vehicles

2019-08-20
CURRENT
AS4073B
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) defines the requirements for air cycle air conditioning systems used on military air vehicles for cooling, heating, ventilation, and moisture and contamination control. General recommendations for an air conditioning system, which may include an air cycle system as a cooling source, are included in MIL-E-18927E and JSSG-2009. Air cycle air conditioning systems include those components which condition high temperature and high pressure air for delivery to occupied and equipment compartments and to electrical and electronic equipment. This document is applicable to open and closed loop air cycle systems. Definitions are contained in Section 5 of this document.
Standard

Heater, Aircraft Internal Combustion Heat Exchanger Type

1996-07-01
HISTORICAL
AS8040A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers internal combustion heat exchanger type heaters used in the following applications: a) cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating); b) wing and empennage anti-icing; c) engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft); d) aircraft de-icing. This document details the minimum safety, performance, design, and testing requirements for internal combustion heaters and certain auxiliary devices that are considered necessary for the utilization of heaters in fixed and rotary wing aircraft. This standard is to be considered currently applicable and necessarily subject to revision from time to time due to advances in the aircraft industry. This standard is based on practical engineering requirements for aircraft heaters currently in use and is applicable to aircraft heaters that shall be developed to meet future requirements.
Standard

Heater and Accessories, Aircraft Internal Combustion Heat Exchanger Type

2019-10-01
CURRENT
AS8040C
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers combustion heaters and accessories used in, but not limited to, the following applications: a Cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating) b Wing and empennage anti-icing c Engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft) d Aircraft deicing
Standard

Heater, Aircraft Internal Combustion Heat Exchanger Type

1988-02-01
HISTORICAL
AS8040
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers internal combustion heat exchanger type heaters used in the following applications: a) cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating); b) wing and empennage anti-icing; c) engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft); d) aircraft de-icing. This document details the minimum safety, performance, design, and testing requirements for internal combustion heaters and certain auxiliary devices that are considered necessary for the utilization of heaters in fixed and rotary wing aircraft. This standard is to be considered currently applicable and necessarily subject to revision from time to time due to advances in the aircraft industry. This standard is based on practical engineering requirements for aircraft heaters currently in use and is applicable to aircraft heaters that shall be developed to meet future requirements.
Standard

Heater, Aircraft Internal Combustion Heat Exchanger Type

2013-02-14
HISTORICAL
AS8040B
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers combustion heaters used in the following applications: a Cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating) b Wing and empennage anti-icing c Engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft) d Aircraft de-icing
Standard

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM CONTAMINATION

1981-01-30
HISTORICAL
AIR1539
This publication will be limited to a discussion of liquid and particulate contaminants which enter the aircraft through the environmental control system (ECS). Gaseous contaminants such as ozone, fuel vapors, sulphates, etc., are not covered in this AIR. It will cover all contamination sources which interface with ECS, and the effects of this contamination on equipment. Methods of control will be limited to the equipment and interfacing ducting which normally falls within the responsiblity of the ECS designer.
Standard

Environmental Control System Contamination

1997-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR1539A
This publication will be limited to a discussion of liquid and particulate contaminants which enter the aircraft through the environmental control system (ECS). Gaseous contaminants such as ozone, fuel vapors, sulphates, etc., are not covered in this AIR. It will cover all contamination sources which interface with ECS, and the effects of this contamination on equipment. Methods of control will be limited to the equipment and interfacing ducting which normally falls within the responsibility of the ECS designer.
Standard

Environmental Control System Contamination

2007-09-26
HISTORICAL
AIR1539B
This publication will be limited to a discussion of liquid and particulate contaminants which enter the aircraft through the environmental control system (ECS). Gaseous contaminants such as ozone, fuel vapors, sulphates, etc., are not covered in this AIR. It will cover all contamination sources which interface with ECS, and the effects of this contamination on equipment. Methods of control will be limited to the equipment and interfacing ducting which normally falls within the responsibility of the ECS designer.
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