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Environmental Control System Contamination

2020-05-29
AIR1539C
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) includes a discussion of liquid and particulate contaminants which enter the aircraft through the environmental control system (ECS). Gaseous contaminants such as ozone, fuel vapors, sulphates, etc. are also covered in this AIR. This publication is concerned with contamination sources which interface with ECS and fuel tank inerting systems, and the effects of this contamination on equipment. Methods of control will be limited to the equipment and interfacing ducting which normally falls within the responsibility of the ECS designer.
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OZONE PROBLEMS IN HIGH ALTITUDE AIRCRAFT

1996-07-01
AIR910A
The purpose of this report is to provide information on ozone and its control in high altitude aircraft environmental systems. Sources of this information are listed in the selected bibliography appearing at the end of this report, to which references are made throughout.
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Aerospace Pressurization System Design

2011-07-25
AIR1168/7A
The pressurization system design considerations presented in this AIR deal with human physiological requirements, characteristics of pressurization air sources, methods of controlling cabin pressure, cabin leakage control, leakage calculation methods, and methods of emergency cabin pressure release.
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COOLING OF MODERN AIRBORNE ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT

1976-05-01
AIR1277
This document contains information on the cooling of modern airborne electronics, emphasizing the use of a heat exchange surface which separates coolant and component. It supplements the information contained in AIR 64 for the draw through method and in AIR 728 for high Mach Number aircraft. Report contents include basic methods, characteristics of coolants, application inside and outside of the "black box" use of thermostatic controls to improve reliability and system design. Characteristics of typical cooling components are treated sufficiently to permit selection and to estimate size and weight. While emphasis is placed herein on equipment cooling, section 9 dealing with thermal control of the environment, reminds the reader that some equipment will require heating for start up from a cold condition or as a means to control temperature within narrow limits (e.g. in a crystal oven). Property data and constants are also tabulated.
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Aircraft Humidification

2016-10-21
WIP
AIR1609B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) covers the design parameters for various methods of humidification applicable to aircraft, the physiological aspects of low humidities, the possible benefits of controlling cabin humidity, the penalties associated with humidification, and the problems which must be solved for practical aircraft humidification systems. The design information is applicable to commercial and military aircraft. The physiological aspects cover all aircraft environmental control applications.
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Aircraft Humidification

2005-03-21
AIR1609A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) covers the design parameters for various methods of humidification applicable to aircraft, the physiological aspects of low humidities, the possible benefits of controlling cabin humidity, the penalties associated with humidification, and the problems which must be solved for practical aircraft humidification systems. The design information is applicable to commercial and military aircraft. The physiological aspects cover all aircraft environmental control applications.
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Air Quality for Commercial Aircraft Cabin Particulate Contaminants

2018-10-17
WIP
AIR4766/1A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) covers airbone particulate contaminants that may be present in commercial aircraft cabin air during operation. Discussions cover sources of contaminants, methods of control and design recommendations. Air quality, ventilation requirements and standards are also discussed.
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Liquid Cooling Systems

2016-09-10
WIP
AIR1811B
The purpose of this Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide guidelines for the selection and design of airborne liquid cooling systems. This publication is applicable to liquid cooling systems of the closed loop type and the expendable coolant type in which the primary function is transporting of heat from its source to a heat sink. Most liquid cooling system applications are oriented toward the cooling of electronics. Liquid cooling techniques, heat sinks, design features, selection of coolants, corrosion control, and servicing requirements for these systems are presented. Information on vapor compression refrigeration systems, which are a type of cooling system, is found in Reference 1.
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ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM TRANSIENT ANALYSIS COMPUTER PROGRAM (EASY)

1994-09-01
AIR1823
The Environmental Control Analysis SYstem (EASY) computer program is summarized in this report. Development of this computer program initially was sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory. (See References 1, 2, 3, and 4.) It provides techniques for determination of steady state and dynamic (transient) ECS performance, and of control system stability; and for synthesis of optimal ECS control systems. The program is available from the U.S. Air Force, or as a proprietary commercial version. General uses of a transient analysis computer program for ECS design and development, and general features of EASY relative to these uses, are presented. This report summarizes the nine analysis options of EASY, EASY program organization for analyzing ECS, data input to the program and resulting data output, and a discussion of EASY limitations. Appendices provide general definitions for dynamic analysis, and samples of input and output for EASY.
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Engineering Analysis System (EASY) Computer Program for Dynamic Analysis of Aircraft ECS

1996-05-01
AIR1823A
The Engineering Analysis SYstem (EASY) computer program is summarized in this report. It provides techniques for analysis of steady-state and dynamic (transient) environmental control system (ECS) performance, control system stability, and for synthesis of optimal ECS. General uses of a transient analysis computer program for ECS design and development, and general features of EASY relative to these uses, are presented. This report summarizes the nine analysis options of EASY, EASY program organization for analyzing ECS, data input to the program and resulting data output, and a discussion of EASY limitations. Appendices provide general definitions for dynamic analysis, and samples of input and output for EASY.
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Spacecraft Life Support Systems

1994-01-01
AIR1168/14
A life support system (LSS) is usually defined as a system that provides elements necessary for maintaining human life and health in the state required for performing a prescribed mission. The LSS, depending upon specific design requirements, will provide pressure, temperature, and composition of local atmosphere, food, and water. It may or may not collect, dispose, or reprocess wastes such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, urine, and feces. It can be seen from the preceding definition that LSS requirements may differ widely, depending on the mission specified, such as operation in Earth orbit or lunar mission. In all cases the time of operation is an important design factor. An LSS is sometimes briefly defined as a system providing atmospheric control and water, waste, and thermal management.
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Spacecraft Life Support Systems

2012-10-15
AIR1168/14A
A life support system (LSS) is usually defined as a system that provides elements necessary for maintaining human life and health in the state required for performing a prescribed mission. The LSS, depending upon specific design requirements, will provide pressure, temperature, and composition of local atmosphere, food, and water. It may or may not collect, dispose, or reprocess wastes such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, urine, and feces. It can be seen from the preceding definition that LSS requirements may differ widely, depending on the mission specified, such as operation in Earth orbit or lunar mission. In all cases the time of operation is an important design factor. An LSS is sometimes briefly defined as a system providing atmospheric control and water, waste, and thermal management.
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Air Conditioning Systems for Subsonic Airplanes

2019-09-25
ARP85G
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) contains guidelines and recommendations for subsonic airplane air conditioning systems and components, including requirements, design philosophy, testing, and ambient conditions. The airplane air conditioning system comprises that arrangement of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply and distribute air to the occupied compartments for ventilation, pressurization, and temperature and moisture control. The principal features of the system are: a A supply of outside air with independent control valve(s). b A means for heating. c A means for cooling (air or vapor cycle units and heat exchangers). d A means for removing excess moisture from the air supply. e A ventilation subsystem. f A temperature control subsystem. g A pressure control subsystem. Other system components for treating cabin air, such as filtration and humidification, are included, as are the ancillary functions of equipment cooling and cargo compartment conditioning.
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Air Conditioning Systems for Subsonic Airplanes

2012-10-09
ARP85F
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) contains guidelines and recommendations for subsonic airplane air conditioning systems and components, including requirements, design philosophy, testing and ambient conditions. The airplane air conditioning system comprises that arrangement of equipment, controls and indicators that supply and distribute air to the occupied compartments for ventilation, pressurization, and temperature and moisture control. The principal features of the system are: a A supply of outside air with independent control valve(s). b A means for heating c A means for cooling (air or vapor cycle units and heat exchangers) d A means for removing excess moisture from the air supply e A ventilation subsystem f A temperature control subsystem g A pressure control subsystem Other system components for treating cabin air such as filtration and humidification are included, as are the ancillary functions of equipment cooling and cargo compartment conditioning.
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Air Conditioning Systems For Subsonic Airplanes

1991-08-01
ARP85E
This ARP discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, and ambient conditions and design considerations for systems within the ATA 100 Specification, Chapter 21 (Reference 1). This chapter is principally concerned with passenger and crew environment and the air conditioning system that maintains this environment. The airplane air conditioning system comprises that arrangement of equipment, controls and indicators that supply and distribute air to the occupied compartments for ventilation, pressurization, and temperature and moisture control.
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GUIDE FOR QUALIFICATION TESTING OF AIRCRAFT AIR VALVES

1990-02-28
ARP986B
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines tests to be performed on hydraulically, electrically, pneumatically, and mechanically actuated air valves. They may be further defined as those valves that function in response to externally applied forces or in response to variations in upstream and/or downstream duct air conditions in order to maintain a calibrated duct air condition (e.g., air flow, air pressure, air temperature, air pressure ratio, or air shutoff).
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The Control of Excess Humidity in Avionics Cooling

2010-06-17
ARP987B
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) outlines the causes and impacts of moisture and/or condensation in avionics equipment and provides recommendations for corrective and preventative action.
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