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Standard

Vibration Damping Materials and Underbody Coatings

2014-06-06
CURRENT
J671_201406
The materials classified under this specification are: a Mastic vibration damping materials used to reduce the sound emanating from metal panels. b Mastic underbody coatings used to give protection and some vibration damping to motor vehicle underbodies, fenders, and other parts.
Standard

Corrosion Test for Insulation Materials

2011-08-31
CURRENT
J1389_201108
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to various insulation materials used in vehicles for control of heat and noise and other applications.
Standard

Laboratory Measurement of the Composite Vibration Damping Properties of Materials on a Supporting Steel Bar

2019-01-17
WIP
J1637
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a laboratory test procedure for measuring the vibration damping performance of a system consisting of a damping material bonded to a vibrating cantilevered steel bar. The bar is often called the Oberst bar (named after Dr. H. Oberst) and the test method is often called the Oberst Bar Test Method. Materials for damping treatments may include homogeneous materials, nonhomogeneous materials, or a combination of homogeneous, nonhomogeneous, and/or inelastic (such as aluminum foil) materials. These materials are commonly installed in transportation systems such as ground vehicles, marine products, and aircraft to reduce vibration at resonance, and thus reduce the noise radiation from the vibrating surface. However, the test method described herein was developed to rank order materials used in PASSENGER VEHICLE APPLICATIONS with steel sheet metal and may not be fully applicable to other situations.
Standard

Laboratory Measurement of the Composite Vibration Damping Properties of Materials on a Supporting Steel Bar

1993-02-01
HISTORICAL
J1637_199302
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a laboratory test procedure for measuring the vibration damping performance of a system consisting of a damping material bonded to a vibrating cantilevered steel bar. The bar is often called the Oberst bar (named after Dr. H. Oberst) and the test method is often called the Oberst Bar Test Method. Materials for damping treatments may include homogeneous materials, nonhomogeneous materials, or a combination of homogeneous, nonhomogeneous, and/or inelastic (such as aluminum foil) materials. These materials are commonly installed in transportation systems such as ground vehicles, marine products, and aircraft to reduce vibration at resonance, and thus reduce the noise radiation from the vibrating surface. However, the test method described herein was developed to rank order materials used in PASSENGER VEHICLE APPLICATIONS with steel sheet metal and may not be fully applicable to other situations.
Standard

Laboratory Measurement of the Composite Vibration Damping Properties of Materials on a Supporting Steel Bar

2007-08-13
HISTORICAL
J1637_200708
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a laboratory test procedure for measuring the vibration damping performance of a system consisting of a damping material bonded to a vibrating cantilevered steel bar. The bar is often called the Oberst bar (named after Dr. H. Oberst) and the test method is often called the Oberst Bar Test Method. Materials for damping treatments may include homogeneous materials, nonhomogeneous materials, or a combination of homogeneous, nonhomogeneous, and/or inelastic (such as aluminum foil) materials. These materials are commonly installed in transportation systems such as ground vehicles, marine products, and aircraft to reduce vibration at resonance, and thus reduce the noise radiation from the vibrating surface. However, the test method described herein was developed to rank order materials used in PASSENGER VEHICLE APPLICATIONS with steel sheet metal and may not be fully applicable to other situations.
Standard

Laboratory Measurement of the Composite Vibration Damping Properties of Materials on a Supporting Steel Bar

2013-06-18
CURRENT
J1637_201306
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a laboratory test procedure for measuring the vibration damping performance of a system consisting of a damping material bonded to a vibrating cantilevered steel bar. The bar is often called the Oberst bar (named after Dr. H. Oberst) and the test method is often called the Oberst Bar Test Method. Materials for damping treatments may include homogeneous materials, nonhomogeneous materials, or a combination of homogeneous, nonhomogeneous, and/or inelastic (such as aluminum foil) materials. These materials are commonly installed in transportation systems such as ground vehicles, marine products, and aircraft to reduce vibration at resonance, and thus reduce the noise radiation from the vibrating surface. The test method described herein was developed to rank order materials for application on panels using general automotive steel but also may be applicable to other situations or conditions.
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