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Technical Paper

Implementing Detailed Chemistry and In-Cylinder Stratification into 0/1-D IC Engine Cycle Simulation Tools

2011-04-12
2011-01-0849
Employing detailed chemistry into modern engine simulation technologies has potential to enhance the robustness and predictive power of such tools. Specifically this means significant advancements in the ability to compute the onset of ignition, low and high temperature heat release, local extinction, knocking, exhaust gas emissions formation etc. resulting in a set of tools which can be employed to carry out virtual engineering studies and add additional insight into common IC engine development activities such as computing IMEP, identifying safe/feasible operating ranges, minimizing exhaust gas emissions and optimizing operating strategy. However the adoption of detailed chemistry comes at a greater computational cost, this paper investigates the means to retain computational robustness and ease of use whist reducing computational timescales.
Technical Paper

Combustion and Emissions Performance Analysis of Conventional and Future Fuels using Advanced CAE

2013-10-14
2013-01-2673
In recent years, there has been rapid progress in characterizing the detailed chemical kinetics associated with the oxidation of liquid hydrocarbons and their blends. However adding these fuel models to the industrial engineer's toolkit has proven a major challenge due to issues associated with high CPU cost and the poor suitability of many of the most promising and well known fuel models to IC engine applications. This paper demonstrates the state-of-the-art in the analysis and modelling of current and future transportation fuels or fuel blends for internal combustion engine applications. First-of-all, a benchmarking of eleven representative fuel models (39 to 1034 species in size) is carried out at engine/engine-like operating conditions by adopting the standard Research Octane and Cetane Number test data for comparison. Next, methods to construct a fuel model for a commercial fuel are outlined using a simple, yet robust surrogate mapping technique.
Technical Paper

Simulating a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Fuelled with a DEE/EtOH Blend

2006-04-03
2006-01-1362
We numerically simulate a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine fuelled with a blend of ethanol and diethyl ether by means of a stochastic reactor model (SRM). A 1D CFD code is employed to calculate gas flow through the engine, whilst the SRM accounts for combustion and convective heat transfer. The results of our simulations are compared to experimental measurements obtained using a Caterpillar CAT3401 single-cylinder Diesel engine modified for HCCI operation. We consider emissions of CO, CO2 and unburnt hydrocarbons as functions of the crank angle at 50% heat release. In addition, we establish the dependence of ignition timing, combustion duration, and emissions on the mixture ratio of the two fuel components. Good qualitative agreement is found between our computations and the available experimental data.
Journal Article

Influence of Injection Timing and Piston Bowl Geometry on PCCI Combustion and Emissions

2009-04-20
2009-01-1102
Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI), a Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) strategy for diesel engines is of increasing interest due to its potential to simultaneously reduce soot and NOx emissions. However, the influence of mixture preparation on combustion phasing and heat release rate in LTC is not fully understood. In the present study, the influence of injection timing on mixture preparation, combustion and emissions in PCCI mode is investigated by experimental and computational methods. A sequential coupling approach of 3D CFD with a Stochastic Reactor Model (SRM) is used to simulate the PCCI engine. The SRM accounts for detailed chemical kinetics, convective heat transfer and turbulent micro-mixing. In this integrated approach, the temperature-equivalence ratio statistics obtained using KIVA 3V are mapped onto the stochastic particle ensemble used in the SRM.
Technical Paper

Modelling a Dual-Fuelled Multi-Cylinder HCCI Engine Using a PDF Based Engine Cycle Simulator

2004-03-08
2004-01-0561
Operating the HCCI engine with dual fuels with a large difference in auto-ignition characteristics (octane number) is one way to control the HCCI operation. The effect of octane number on combustion, emissions and engine performance in a 6 cylinder SCANIA truck engine, fuelled with n-heptane and isooctane, and running in HCCI mode, are investigated numerically and compared with measurements taken from Olsson et al. [SAE 2000-01-2867]. To correctly simulate the HCCI engine operation, we implement a probability density function (PDF) based stochastic reactor model (including detailed chemical kinetics and accounting for inhomogeneities in composition and temperature) coupled with GT-POWER, a 1-D fluid dynamics based engine cycle simulator. Such a coupling proves to be ideal for the understanding of the combustion phenomenon as well as the gas dynamics processes intrinsic to the engine cycle.
Technical Paper

Application of the SRM Engine Suite over the Entire Load-Speed Operation of a U.S. EPA Tier 4 Capable IC Engine

2016-04-05
2016-01-0571
Internal combustion (IC) engines that meet Tier 4 Final emissions standards comprise of multiple engine operation and control parameters that are essential to achieve the low levels of NOx and soot emissions. Given the numerous degrees of freedom and the tight cost/time constraints related to the test bench, application of virtual engineering to IC engine development and emissions reduction programmes is increasingly gaining interest. In particular, system level simulations that account for multiple cycle simulations, incylinder turbulence, and chemical kinetics enable the analysis of combustion characteristics and emissions, i.e. beyond the conventional scope of focusing on engine performance only. Such a physico-chemical model can then be used to develop Electronic Control Unit in order to optimise the powertrain control strategy and/or the engine design parameters.
Technical Paper

Evaluating Emissions in a Modern Compression Ignition Engine Using Multi-Dimensional PDF-Based Stochastic Simulations and Statistical Surrogate Generation

2018-09-10
2018-01-1739
Digital engineering workflows, involving physico-chemical simulation and advanced statistical algorithms, offer a robust and cost-effective methodology for model-based internal combustion engine development. In this paper, a modern Tier 4 capable Cat® C4.4 engine is modelled using a digital workflow that combines the probability density function (PDF)-based Stochastic Reactor Model (SRM) Engine Suite with the statistical Model Development Suite (MoDS). In particular, an advanced multi-zonal approach is developed and applied to simulate fuels, in-cylinder combustion and gas phase as well as particulate emissions characteristics, validated against measurements and benchmarked with respect to the predictive power and computational costs of the baseline model. The multi-zonal SRM characterises the combustion chamber on the basis of different multi-dimensional PDFs dependent upon the bulk or the thermal boundary layer in contact with the cylinder liner.
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